Practice Questions for Business Statistics

Warning: This web page document is quite long and has many (intra)connecting links. Do NOT click on any links until the entire document has been loaded by your web browser.

Return to Brian Schott @ GSU

Return to the list of chapters

Chapter: Data Collection Methods

Contents:

28-1 Any characteristic of a population distribution may properly be

36-2 which the tools of inferential statistics can be used

721-3 A factor that is varied by an experimenter in order to

729-1 "Characteristics of a population are called ________, while"

729-3 A population is:

733-1 The set of test scores for Miss Grady's class comprise

743-2 Populations are always infinite.

744-1 Statistical interpretation depends not only upon statistical ideas

746-2 The smallest unit used in the selection process of the samp

777-2 FACTOR

1131-2 "In this experiment, IQ serves as:"

1132-1 "In this experiment, anxiety serves as:"

1132-2 "In this experiment, the drug serves as:"

1134-2 "In this experiment, the achievement test serves as:"

1136-2 Which of the following names a variable and not a level of a variable?

1141-2 Which of the following groups would serve best in this study?

1142-1 The control group in an experiment should be designed to receive

1144-1 This study would be classified as:

1148-1 An independent variable is:

1422-1 A 95% confidnece interval for a population mean will be ______ a

1425-2 A confidence interval estimate for a parameter is used to

1426-2 Confidence intervals can be shortened by increasing the sample size.

1460-1 "If the size of the sample being used is increased, "

1461-1 Which set of circumstances is most likely to result in a narrow

1511-1 "For a given situation, the longer your confidence interval"

1513-1 "Generally, a larger sample size implies a shorter confidence interval."

1513-2 Generally a larger sample size implies a larger level of confidence

1548-1 The larger the sample size the wider the confidence interval.

1563-1 Is it a simple random sample?

1564-2 An important objective of statistics is to draw conclusions about

1565-1 Target Population.

1573-1 if the samples had been of size 100?

1727-2 Do you agree or disagree with the stated conclusion?

1789-1 Do you regard 27% as a trustworthy estimate

1832-1 Draw all possible samples of size 2 from population 1

1870-1 How will you select brands?

1893-3 Create a simple data set and explain how it would be used

1908-4 The variance of the population is:

1911-2 The variance (SIGMA**2) for this population of data is:

1952-1 If a random sample is sufficiently large its variance will be

1961-1 the range of the middle fifty percent of

2629-1 What is the importance of randomization in experimental investigation?

2726-2 What is a placebo?

2748-1 A treatment effect is the increase or decrease in the size of the

2749-1 Random assignment of experimental units to treatments is necessary for

2752-1 FACTOR

2752-2 ILLUSTRATION OF FACTORS HELD CONSTANT IN AN INVESTIGATION

2753-1 ILLUSTRATION OF FACTORS NOT HELD CONSTANT BUT REGARDED AS NEGLIGIBLE

2760-1 CONTROL OR CHECK TREATMENT

2766-1 CONTROLLED INVESTIGATION

2813-1 What are the reasons for sampling?

2814-2 The smallest unit used in the selection process in a sample survey

2814-3 The smallest unit on which a measurement or record in a sample survey

2814-4 The method of choosing individuals from one or more populations is

2820-1 The major advantage of a probability sample compared with a non-

2822-1 and why is randomization so important in statistics?

2822-3 since we have used randomization at some level

2823-3 A random sample is a representative sample.

2824-3 in most applied situations sampling with replacement is used.

2825-1 Randomness is less important in a large sample than in a small

2825-3 A simple random sample is one where

2826-1 Which of the following is a necessary condition for a sample to be

2826-2 A (simple) random sample is defined by

2827-1 Which of the following is NOT true of simple random sampling?

2829-1 Is his sample random? Why or why not?

2830-2 Outline a method for obtaining a random sample in such a situation.

2831-1 Which houses would you visit to obtain the interviews?

2833-2 replace individuals chosen before drawing another.

2891-2 Your statistics class

2902-1 A list or a description of every sampling unit in the universe is

2904-1 Sampling error occurs because

2904-3 "Sampling error, which can be attributed to the fact that only a sample"

2921-1 which one of the following errors would be most likely to occur:

2922-1 Explain why the Digest was so wrong.

Return to the list of chapters

Return to Brian Schott @ GSU

Questions:

28-1

    Q:  Any characteristic of a population distribution may properly be
        referred to as a

        a.  standard deviation.
        b.  raw score.
        c.  standard score.
        d.  standard error.
        e.  parameter.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


36-2

    Q:  A researcher studying consumer buying habits questions every twentieth
        person entering Publix Supermarket.  He asks, "How many times per week
        do you go grocery shopping?"  He then records the answer as T.

        i)  Then [T = 3] is

            a) a sample space    b) a random variable    c) an event of interest
            d) b and c           e) none of these

        Suppose the researcher questions 427 shoppers during the survey.

        ii)  Give an example relating to this survey of the kind of question
            which the tools of descriptive statistics can be used to answer.

        iii)  Give an example relating to this survey of the kind of question
            which the tools of inferential statistics can be used to answer.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


721-3

    Q:  A factor that is varied by an experimenter in order to
        assess its effect is known as a(n):

        a.  dependent variable
        b.  independent variable
        c.  control variable
        d.  none of the above

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


729-1

    Q:  Characteristics of a population are called ________, while those of a
        sample are termed _________.

        a.  statistics;  measures           d.  statistics;  parameters
        b.  parameters;  statistics         e.  none of these
        c.  statistics;  variables

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


729-3

    Q:  A population is:

        a.  a number or measurement collected as a result of observation
        b.  a subset of a population
        c.  a characteristic of a population which is measurable
        d.  a complete set of individuals, objects, or measurements having
            some common observable characteristics
        e.  none of these

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


733-1

    Q:  Suppose  we  are  interested  in the average reading achievement test
        score of the currently enrolled students in Edison Elementary School.

         i.  The set of test scores for Miss Grady's class comprise

             a. an element.
             b. a sample.
             c. a statistic.
             d. a population.

        ii.  The average score of all students in Edison School is a

             a. sample.
             b. statistic.
             c. parameter.
             d. variable.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


743-2

    Q:  True or False?

        Populations are always infinite.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


744-1

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        Statistical interpretation depends not only upon statistical ideas
        but also upon "ordinary" clear thinking regarding ideas of cause and
        effect.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


746-2

    Q:  True or False?

        The smallest unit used in the selection process of the sample is
        called a sampling unit.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


777-2

    Q:  Define the following term and give an example of its use.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        FACTOR

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1131-2

    Q:  An experiment is conducted to determine if the use of certain specified
        amounts of a drug will increase the IQ scores differentially for high
        and low anxious students in the fifth grade.

        In this experiment, IQ serves as:

        a)  a primary independent variable
        b)  a moderator variable
        c)  a dependent variable
        d)  a control variable
        e)  an intervening variable.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1132-1

    Q:  An experiment is conducted to determine if the use of certain specified
        amounts of  a  drug will increase the IQ scores differentially for high
        and low anxious students in the fifth grade.

        In this experiment, anxiety serves as:

        a)  a primary independent variable
        b)  a moderator variable
        c)  a dependent variable
        d)  a control variable
        e)  an intervening variable.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1132-2

    Q:  An experiment is conducted to determine if the use of certain specified
        amounts of a drug will increase the IQ scores differentially for high
        and low anxious students in the fifth grade.

        In this experiment, the drug serves as:

        a)  a primary independent variable
        b)  a moderator variable
        c)  a dependent variable
        d)  a control variable
        e)  an intervening variable.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1134-2

    Q:  Male students are assigned randomly to either a rote learning (memori-
        zation) treatment or to a discovery learning treatment.  At the end of
        the experiment, students are tested for their ability to answer ques-
        tions on an achievement test.  The results indicate that fast learners
        in the discovery treatment do better than the slow learners in this
        treatment, but there is no difference in performance between the two
        types of learners in the rote treatment.

        In this experiment, the achievement test serves as:

        a.  a primary independent variable
        b.  a moderator variable
        c.  a dependent variable
        d.  a control variable
        e.  an intervening variable

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1136-2

    Q:  Male students are assigned randomly to either a rote learning (memori-
        zation) treatment or to a discovery learning treatment.  At the end of
        the experiment, students are tested for their ability to answer ques-
        tions on an achievement test.  The results indicate that fast learners
        in the discovery treatment do better than the slow learners in this
        treatment, but there is no difference in performance between the two
        types of learners in the rote treatment.

        Which of the following names a variable and not a level of a variable?

        a.  Male sophomores
        b.  High anxious students
        c.  Grade point average
        d.  Treatment A
        e.  All of the above

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1141-2

    Q:  In a study on the effect of reinforcement on learning from pro-
        grammed text, two experimental treatments are planned:  reinforce-
        ment given after every frame of programmed text or reinforcement
        given after every three frames.  Which one of the following control
        groups would serve best in this study?

        a.  A group which does not read the programmed text material.
        b.  A group which reads the programmed material in prose format.
        c.  A group which reads the programmed material but does not re-
            ceive reinforcement.
        d.  A group which reads the programmed text material and rein-
            forcement is given at random.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1142-1

    Q:  The control group in an experiment should be designed to receive:

        a.  the opposite of the experiences afforded the experimental group.
        b.  the experiences afforded the experimental group except for the
            treatment under examination.
        c.  the experiences afforded the experimental group except for
            receiving the treatment at random.
        d.  the experiences which constitute an absence of the experiences
            received by the experimental group.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1144-1

    Q:  A coach in a large high school thinks that ballet training will im-
        prove the batting performance of his baseball team.  He decides to
        have a randomly selected half of the team take six weeks of ballet
        training before the baseball season begins while the other half does
        not take such training.  He will then compare the season batting aver-
        ages of group A (those with ballet training) and group B (those with-
        out ballet training) by comparing the mean of group A with the mean
        of group B.

        This study would be classified as:

        a.  a survey study
        b.  an ex post facto study
        c.  a correlational study
        d.  a trend study
        e.  an experimental study

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1148-1

    Q:  A coach in a large high school thinks that ballet training will  improve
        the batting performance of his baseball team.  He decides to have a ran-
        domly selected half of the team take six weeks of ballet training before
        the baseball season begins,  while  the  other  half does not take  such
        training.  He will then compare the season batting  averages  of group A
        (those with ballet training) and group B (those without ballet training)
        by comparing the mean of group A with the mean of group B.

        An independent variable is:

        a.  ballet training
        b.  batting average
        c.  runs batted in
        d.  the size of the school
        e.  the grades the players make in the ballet school

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1422-1

    Q:  A 95% confidnece interval for a population mean will be ______ a
        99% confidence interval for the same population mean.  (Both cal-
        culations based on the same set of data.)

        a.  longer than
        b.  shorter than
        c.  the same length as
        d.  it depends on the particular set of data
        e.  none of these

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1425-2

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        A confidence interval estimate for a parameter is used to eliminate
        the element of chance from estimation.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1426-2

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        Confidence intervals can be shortened by increasing the sample size.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1460-1

    Q:  If the size of the sample being used is increased, then the width of
        a 0.95 confidence interval estimate for a population mean will:

        a)  Become narrower.
        b)  Become wider.
        c)  Not be changed.
        d)  The effect on the width cannot be determined from the given
            information.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1461-1

    Q:  Which set of circumstances is most  likely  to  result  in  a  narrow
        confidence interval?

        a.  large n and a confidence coefficient of .95.
        b.  large n and a confidence coefficient of .99.
        c.  small n and a confidence coefficient of .95.
        d.  small n and a confidence coefficient of .99.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1511-1

    Q:  True or False?  If false, correct it.

        For a given situation, the longer your confidence interval
        is, the lower your confidence in it is.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1513-1

    Q:  True or False?  If False, explain why.

        Generally, a larger sample size implies a shorter confidence interval.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1513-2

    Q:  True or false? If false, explain why.

             Generally a larger sample size implies a larger level of confidence
             in estimating a parameter.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1548-1

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        The larger the sample size the wider the confidence interval.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1563-1

    Q:  A sample is chosen by numbering all the red books in the
        library and then choosing the ones that correspond to random
        digits in a table.

        Is the sample independent?
        Is it a simple random sample?
        Of what population?

        (Explain your answers reasonably.)

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1564-2

    Q:  True or False?

        An important objective of statistics is to draw conclusions about
        the population from information obtained from a sample.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1565-1

    Q:  Define the following term and give an example of its use:

        Target Population.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1573-1

    Q:  All possible samples of size 10 were taken from a particular population.
        The mean of all the sample means was found to be 12.7 and the variance
        of the sample means was 0.32.

        a.  What are the mean and variance of the population?
        b.  What would the mean and variance of sample means have been if
            the samples had been of size 100?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1727-2

    Q:  Of a sample of 63 deaths of people aged 12 to 21 in a large metro-
        politan area, 52 or 83% were caused by accidents.  The stated con-
        clusion is that "teenagers" are accident prone in the sense that
        they are more likely to die of accidents than older people or in-
        fants.  Do you agree or disagree with the stated conclusion?
        Support your answer.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1789-1

    Q:  Around 1970 a research organization sent questionnaires to all of the
        15,000 or  so  high  school  systems  in  the  United  States.  These
        questionnaires  asked about computer useage in the school system.  As
        many as 3,600 schools systems returned answers.  Of these 3,600,  27%
        indicated that some of their students used computers.

        In  a  recent  speech,  an  authority on the use of computers in high
        school education cited this study as evidence that "students  in  27%
        of  the high school systems in the United States use computers during
        their high school careers."

        Do you regard 27% as a trustworthy  estimate  of  the  proportion  of
        school  systems  providing  computer  access  in  1970?  Explain your
        answer.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1832-1

    Q:  Given:  Population 1:  3, 4, 5
                Population 2:  0, 3

        Draw all possible samples of size 2 from population 1 with replacement,
        and all possible samples of size 3 from population 2 with replacement.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1870-1

    Q:  Suppose that you have been assigned to study the impact of a new
        appliance on the energy demands in a region.  You find that there are
        very many brands of this appliance and that there are no obvious
        characteristics that suggest differences in energy requirements.  Your
        resources will permit an experiment with adequate replication of six
        treatments.

        a.  How will you select brands?
        b.  What parameter(s) associated with treatments will you estimate?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1893-3

    Q:  Create a simple data set and explain how it would be used
        to verify whether a computer program or calculator computes a
        population standard deviation or an estimate of the population
        standard deviation.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1908-4

    Q:  A population consists of the numbers [2003, 1999, 2001, 1997, 2000,
        2005, 1995].  The variance of the population is:

        1)  11.6
        2)  the mean deviation
        3)  10
        4)  2010
        5)  none of the above

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1911-2

    Q:  Consider the following data:

        -4, 3, 8, -2, 7, 7, 6, 11, 4, 10

        The variance (SIGMA**2) for this population of data is:

        A. 10.3   D. 21.4
        B. 16     E. none of these.
        C. 18.3

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1952-1

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        If a random sample is sufficiently large its variance will be
        very close to SIGMA**2/n.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


1961-1

    Q:  For random samples of size 100 from a normal distribution with mean 92
        and standard deviation 25,  the range  of  the middle fifty percent of
        sample means is approximately:

        (1)  80 to 100
        (2)  88 to 96
        (3)  90 to 94
        (4)  91.7 to 92.3
        (5)  90.3 to 93.7

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2629-1

    Q:  What is the importance of randomization in experimental investigation?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2726-2

    Q:  What is a placebo?
            a.  an experimental treatment
            b.  a control treatment
            c.  a parameter
            d.  a statistic

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2748-1

    Q:  True or False?

        A treatment effect is the increase or decrease in the size of the
        response over what would have been observed had the treatment not
        been applied.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2749-1

    Q:  True or False?

        Random assignment of experimental units to treatments is necessary for
        the application of most tests involving comparisons among a set of
        treatments.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2752-1

    Q:  Define the following term and give an example of its use.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        FACTOR

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2752-2

    Q:  Give an example that could be described by the following phrase.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        ILLUSTRATION OF FACTORS HELD CONSTANT IN AN INVESTIGATION

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2753-1

    Q:  Give an example that could be described by the following phrase.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        ILLUSTRATION OF FACTORS NOT HELD CONSTANT BUT REGARDED AS NEGLIGIBLE

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2760-1

    Q:  Define the following term and give an example of its use.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        CONTROL OR CHECK TREATMENT

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2766-1

    Q:  Define the following term and give an example of its use.
        Your example should not be one given in class or in a handout.

        CONTROLLED INVESTIGATION

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2813-1

    Q:  What are the reasons for sampling?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2814-2

    Q:  The smallest unit used in the selection process in a sample survey
        design is known as the ____________________________ unit.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2814-3

    Q:  The smallest unit on which a measurement or record in a sample survey
        is obtained is known as ___________________________________ unit.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2814-4

    Q:  The method of choosing individuals from one or more populations is
        called the ____________________.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2820-1

    Q:  The major advantage of a probability sample compared with a non-
        probability sample is that

             a.  it saves time          c.  it prevents destructive sampling
             b.  it costs less          d.  sampling error can be estimated

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2822-1

    Q:  In statistics we speak often of a random sample.  What is a
        random sample, and why is randomization so important in
        statistics?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2822-3

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        Consider an experiment to test the effectiveness of the Salk Vaccine.
        If we intend to use probability theory to guide us in our judgement
        about the results, we should be doubtful about the accuracy of our
        conclusions since we have used randomization at some level in the
        experimental design.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2823-3

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        A random sample is a representative sample.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2824-3

    Q:  True or false? If false, explain why.

             Generally, in most applied situations sampling with replacement is
             used.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2825-1

    Q:  True or False?  Explain your answer.

        Randomness is less important in a large sample than in a small
        sample.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2825-3

    Q:  A simple random sample is one where

        a)  you decide on a sample size and sample proportionately from
            the population.
        b)  you choose each item with no regard to previous choices.
        c)  each item in the population has an equal chance of being chosen.
        d)  all of the above are true.
        e)  none of the above are true.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2826-1

    Q:  Which of the following is a necessary condition for a sample to be
        random?

        a.  Every person in the population has the same likelihood of being
            included in the sample.
        b.  The choice of the method of selecting individuals from the popu-
            lation is governed entirely by chance.
        c.  Proportions of various grooups selected are equal to correspond-
            ing proportions in the population.
        d.  The characteristics of the sample are the same as the characteris-
            tics of the population.
        e.  None of the above is necessary.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2826-2

    Q:  A (simple) random sample is defined by

        a.  the method of selection.
        b.  outcome of selection.
        c.  both of the above.
        d.  its degree of resemblance to the population.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2827-1

    Q:  Which of the following is NOT true of simple random sampling?

        a.  Whether or not a sample is random cannot be told from inspection
            of the sample.
        b.  Characteristics of a random sample may differ widely from
            characteristics of its population.
        c.  A sample must be reasonably large to be considered a random sample.
        d.  Every element in the population must be given an equal chance for
            inclusion in the sample.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2829-1

    Q:  Samuel Student wanted a random sample of 50 students.  He decided
        to choose the first fifty students entering one of the dining halls
        at a randomly selected time during the dinner hour.

        a.  Is his sample random?  Why or why not?

        b.  Is his sample representative?  Why or why not?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2830-2

    Q:  Suppose that you have been assigned to estimate the height of a
        group of corn plants arranged in 4 rows with 50 plants in each row.
        You may take measurements of 10 plants.

        a.  Outline a method for obtaining a random sample in such a situation.
        b.  What advantages or disadvantages are in such a procedure?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2831-1

    Q:     Street                                                    Street
            |  |                                                      |  |
            |  |                                                      |  |
            |  |  +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+  |  |
            |  |  | 1 |    | 2 |    | 3 |    | 4 |    | 5 |    | 6 |  |  |
            |  |  +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+    +---+  |  |
        ----+  +------------------------------------------------------+  +----
                                        Street
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------

        You have been instructed to obtain interviews from 2 randomly selected
        households in the above set of 6 houses.  Each house contains one
        household.
        a)  Which houses would you visit to obtain the interviews?  Indicate how
            you would choose these houses.
        b)  Suppose that you plan to visit this neighborhood between 1:00 pm and
            4:00 pm on a particular day.  How will you provide for the possi-
            bility that no one will be available to interview in one or both of
            the houses that you have chosen?
        c)  Would you expect any differences among these 6 units on the basis
            of the above sketch?

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2833-2

    Q:  True or False?  If False, correct it.

        If  you  are  to take a random sample of n = 10 people from a certain
        area, you must be careful to replace individuals chosen before drawing
        another.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2891-2

    Q:  Your statistics class

           a. is a representative sample of your college student body
           b. is not a representative sample of your college student body
           c. is not a sample of your college student body
           d. none of the above

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2902-1

    Q:  A list or a description of every sampling unit in the universe is
        known as the _______________________________.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2904-1

    Q:  Sampling error occurs because

           a.  most interviewers are not accurate in their reports
           b.  a sample is used instead of a population
           c.  the statistician uses judgement in choosing the sample
           d.  all of the above

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2904-3

    Q:  Sampling error, which can be attributed to the fact that only a sample
        of values is observed, is

        a.  the expected value of a sample statistic.
        b.  the difference between a population value and an estimate of that
            value.
        c.  the variance of a random sample.
        d.  the standard error of the mean of random samples.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2921-1

    Q:  For a daytime house-to-house survey to study women's attitudes about
        their role in society, which one of the following errors would be most
        likely to occur:

                a.)  reporting and processing errors
                b.)  interviewer contamination
                c.)  non-response
                d.)  false information by the respondents

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


2922-1

    Q:  In the 1936 Presidential Election Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Alfred
        E. Landon in a landslide vote.  A Landon victory had been predicted by
        the Literary Digest, a magazine which ran the oldest, largest, and most
        widely publicized of the polls at the time.  The Digest's final predic-
        tion was based on ten million sample ballots mailed to prospective vo-
        ters and 2.3 million were returned.  The sample of voters was drawn from
        lists of automobile and telephone owners.  Despite the massive size
        of this sample, it failed to predict a Roosevelt victory, being off the
        mark by 19 percentage points.  Explain why the Digest was so wrong.

Back to this chapter's Contents

Look at the answer


Return to the list of chapters

Return to Brian Schott @ GSU

Answers:

28-1

    A:  e.  parameter.

            The parameter can be the mean of a population or the standard devi-
            ation of a population.  Both mean and standard deviation are charac-
            teristics of a population distribution.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


36-2

    A:  i)  c) an event of interest

            (T = 3) is one event in a sample space. T is a random variable.

        ii)  What is the average number of times people in this sample go
            grocery shopping per week?

        iii)  What is the average number of times per week people who shop at
            Publix Supermarket go grocery shopping?

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


721-3

    A:  b.  independent variable

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


729-1

    A:  b.  parameters;  statistics

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


729-3

    A:  d.  a complete set of individuals, objects, or measurements having
            some common observable characteristics

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


733-1

    A:   i.  b. a sample.
        ii.  c. a parameter.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


743-2

    A:  False.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


744-1

    A:  True.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


746-2

    A:  True

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


777-2

    A:  Definition:  The name of a condition, characteristic, quality or
                     property suspected of being able to affect a response.

        Example:     If we write a list of factors suspected of affecting the
                     productivity of say, tomato plants, we can compile quite
                     a long list including such things as amount of sunlight,
                     moisture supply, supply of various nutrient (Nitrogen,
                     Phosphorus, Potassium, etc.), variety, night temperature,
                     etc.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1131-2

    A:  c)  a dependent variable.  (IQ is the response measure in the study.)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1132-1

    A:  b)  a moderator variable.  (Anxiety may moderate the effect of the drug
            on children's IQ.)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1132-2

    A:  a)  a primary independent variable.  (The drug is being manipulated to
            exert an effect on IQ.)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1134-2

    A:  c.  a dependent variable

            The achievement test serves as a dependent variable because
            achievement is the response measure.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1136-2

    A:  c.  Grade point average

            All other alternatives are levels or values of variables.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1141-2

    A:  c.  A group which reads the programmed material but does not
            receive reinforcement.

            Control group is identical to experimental groups except that
            reinforcement, the independent variable, is withheld.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1142-1

    A:  b.  the experiences afforded the experimental group except for the
            treatment under examination.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1144-1

    A:  e.  an experimental study

            This is an experimental study because an independent variable was
            manipulated.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1148-1

    A:  a.  ballet training

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1422-1

    A:  b.  shorter than

            When the data set is the same, the length of the confidence
            interval depends on the Z or t value used.  This value is
            smaller for 95% confidence than for 99% confidence, so it
            will result in a smaller interval.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1425-2

    A:  False, the confidence interval is used to acknowledge the element of
        chance in estimation.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1426-2

    A:  True, other things being equal, the confidence interval will decrease as
        sample size increases.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1460-1

    A:  a)  Become narrower.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1461-1

    A:  a.  large n and a confidence coefficient of .95.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1511-1

    A:  False.  For a given situation, the longer your confidence
        interval is, the higher your confidence in it is.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1513-1

    A:  True

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1513-2

    A:  False, the level of confidence (1  -  ALPHA)  is  not  influenced  by
        sample size.  However, the interval estimate will be made more precise
        (narrower) by the larger sample size for the same level of confidence.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1548-1

    A:  False - The larger the sample size the narrower the
        confidence interval.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1563-1

    A:  Population: Red books in the library.

        Sample: Simple random, because every one of the distinct
                samples has an equal chance of being drawn,
                where M = sample size, N = number of red books.

        Every sample of size M is independent of any other sample
      of size M.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1564-2

    A:  True

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1565-1

    A:  Target  Population  is the totality of elementary units relevant to a
        given study.  The working population (frame) and the  gap  constitute
        the target population

        Example:

        In a study to find out average daily consumption of beer per person in
        a given restaurant,  the target population will be all the people vis-
        iting the restaurant on the day of the survey.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1573-1

    A:  a.  MU = MU(XBAR) = 12.7
            SIGMA(XBAR)**2 = (SIGMA**2)/n
            SIGMA**2 = 10 * .32 = 3.2

        b.               n = 10
                  MU(XBAR) = 12.7
            SIGMA(XBAR)**2 = .32

            If n = 100:
                  MU(XBAR) = 12.7
            SIGMA(XBAR)**2 = 10 * .32/100 = .032

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1727-2

    A:  Teenagers may, in fact, be accident prone, but the data don't support
        this conclusion.  If a teenager dies he is likely to die of an acci-
        dent, because he is less susceptible to disease and "natural" causes
        to which older people and infants are more susceptible.

        The sample is not of sufficient size to conclude that teenagers as a
        group are accident prone.  The sample may be biased because it is
       a large metropolitan area, thus excluding suburban and rural teen-
        agers.  It may be that there are more accidents in a metropolitan
        area to everyone, not just teenagers, simply because it is a metro-
        politan area.

        The 83% figure seems high, but no corresponding accident rates are
        given for infants and older people.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1789-1

    A:  No.   Only  about one-quarter of the high school systems responded to
        the  questionnaire.   Since  having  a  computer  then  was  probably
        regarded  as  a  good  thing,  I  would  expect  that  schools having
        computers would be more likely to respond to the  questionnaire  than
        those  that didn't. I don't think that a check on non-respondents would
        reveal a percentage mean of 27% that used a computer.  (If  the overall
        percentage is 27% and that  is the  percentage among  the  respondents,
        then it must also be the percentage using computers among the  three-
        quarters that didn't respond.  The  above  reasoning indicates  this is
        not the case.)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1832-1

    A:  All possible samples of size 2 from population 1 with replacement:

             (3, 3)     (3, 4)     (3, 5)
             (4, 3)     (4, 4)     (4, 5)
             (5, 3)     (5, 4)     (5, 5)

        All possible samples of size 3 from population 2 with replacement:

             (0, 0, 0)     (0, 0, 3)     (0, 3, 0)     (0, 3, 3)
             (3, 0, 0)     (3, 0, 3)     (3, 3, 0)     (3, 3, 3)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1870-1

    A:  a.  Randomly select six brands from those available.
        b.  Since treatments have been randomly selected, the treatment effects
        calculated in this trial can be used to estimate the variance component
        due to brands.  This variance indicates the spread of a population of
        brand effects having a mean of zero.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1893-3

    A:  Data set:  1, 1, 3, 5, 5
        MU = 3
        SIGMA = SQRT (((1-3)**2 + (1-3)**2 + (3-3)**2 + (5=3)**2 + (5-3)**2)/5)
              =  SQRT ((4+4+0+4+4)/5)
              =  SQRT (16/5)
              =  SQRT (3.2)
              = 1.79
            S = SQRT(16/4)
              = 2
        Using the above data set, if the standard deviation is given
        as two, then it has been calculated as an estimate of the
        population standard deviation, if it is given as 1.79, then it has
        been calculated as a population standard deviation, and if
        neither of these two values result, something is going wrong.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1908-4

    A:  (3)  10

        Coding (X - 2000):  3, -1, 1, -3, 0, 5, -5

        Mean = 0
        X**2 = 9, 1, 1, 9, 0, 25, 25

        SIGMA**2 = (SUM(X**2))/n = 70/7 = 10

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1911-2

    A:  D. 21.4

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1952-1

    A:  False.
        If a random sample is sufficiently large its variance will be
        very close to SIGMA**2.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


1961-1

    A:  (5)  90.3 to 93.7

             XBAR +/- Z*SIGMA/SQRT(n)
             92 +/- .675*(25/10)
             92 +/- 1.69
             (90.3, 93.7)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2629-1

    A:  Randomization makes the assumption of independent errors appropriate,
        and helps to eliminate systematic bias.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2726-2

    A:  b.  a control treatment

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2748-1

    A:  True

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2749-1

    A:  True

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2752-1

    A:  Definition:  A condition or state that is thought to influence
                     response.

        Example:     Suppose that the response measured is miles per gallon
                     for a car.  Factors that may influence that response
                     include:  brand and model of car, driving speed, type
                     of transmission, driving conditions (city vs. open
                     highway), driver, etc.  Any condition that can vary and
                     has some potential of affecting miles per gallon when
                     it varies may be regarded as a factor with respect to
                     that response.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2752-2

    A:  Example:     Suppose we were investigating the relationship between
                     kind of pot used for boiling water and time required to
                     bring one quart of water to a boil.  Factors held con-
                     stant for each experimental unit might include size of
                     pot, initial temperature of water and pot, amount of
                     water, source of heat and rate of delivery, person making
                     a judgement about when boiling begins, atmospheric pres-
                     sure, and device used to measure elapsed time.  These
                     factors would be held constant or nearly constant so that
                     differences in time needed to bring water to a boil would
                     in fact reflect differences among pots rather than dif-
                     ferences in other factors.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2753-1

    A:  Example:     Suppose we were investigating the relationship between
                     kind of pot used for boiling water and time required to
                     bring one quart of water to a boil.  If one person con-
                     ducts the trial, each occasion of starting with cold
                     water and ending with boiling water will occur at a
                     different time and the observer will almost certainly
                     vary in attentiveness or fatigue.  Usually this varia-
                     tion in the person conducting the trial would be
                     regarded as negligible.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2760-1

    A:  Definition:  A condition or state that is included in a treatment
                     set because it is regarded as standard or a reasonable
                     reference state.  Often a control or check treatment
                     corresponds to what is regarded as current practice.

        Example:     Suppose that a chemical company wishes to test 5
                     compounds that are thought to provide protection against
                     diseases that interfere with seed germination or early
                     seedling development.  In such a case at least two dif-
                     ferent kinds of check or control treatments might be
                     considered for inclusion in the treatment set.  One
                     check might be a treatment in which seed was not treated
                     with any chemical so that comparisons could be made be-
                     tween untreated seed and seed treated with one of the 5
                     test chemicals.  Another check might be a treatment in
                     which seed was treated with a compound currently in wide-
                     spread use.  In either case, the reason for using the
                     check treatments is to provide for comparison of the test
                     compounds with what are regarded as common practice (or
                     common practices) where the test compounds and the check
                     treatments are subjected to the same experimental condi-
                     tions.  (There are few groans louder than those that come
                     from someone who momentarily believes that a test material
                     has completely prevented disease only to find that the un-
                     treated check or standard also is disease free.)

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2766-1

    A:  Definition:  An inquiry in which it is possible to assign treatments to
                     test units and to arrange matters so that mean differences
                     in response to treatment provide an indication of the in-
                     fluence of treatments only.

        Example:     Suppose that the treatments to be assessed were 4 asking
                     prices for a type of house, that the response was time to
                     sell, and that we could control the assignment of asking
                     prices to a large number of houses.  Then we should be able
                     to conduct a controlled investigation that will allow us
                     to estimate differences in selling time due to asking price
                     in a manner where other complicating factors are constant
                     or balanced out.  This would be in contrast to the usual
                     situation where asking price and time to sell can be ob-
                     served only in circumstances where other complicating
                     factors are not balanced out but often are closely linked
                     to asking price.  (Then it's often not possible to say
                     whether a difference in selling time is due to price,
                     location, style, salesman, etc.).

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2813-1

    A:  Sampling is used when:

        1.  it will yield more accurate results than a census
        2.  the population is infinite
        3.  there is a limited amount of time available
        4.  the nature of the test is destructive
        5.  the cost of gathering the data is a factor.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-2

    A:  The smallest unit used in the selection process in a sample survey
        design is known as the sampling unit.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-3

    A:  The smallest unit on which a measurement or record in a sample survey
        is obtained is known as the observational or experimental unit.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-4

    A:  The method of choosing individuals from one or more populations is
        called the sampling procedure.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2820-1

    A:  d.  sampling error can be estimated

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2822-1

    A:  A random sample occurs when every observation in the population
        has a known (usually equal) chance of becoming part of the sample.
        Randomization is important because the probability associated with
        the statistics computed from the sample are measurable, thus enabling
        one to make valid inferences about the population from which the sample
        was drawn.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2822-3

    A:  False, you would be doubtful only if you had "not used randomization".

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2823-3

    A:  False - A random sample does not guarantee a representative sample.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2824-3

    A:  False, in most applied situations the population is large enough
        that sampling is performed without replacement.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2825-1

    A:  False.  No matter what the size of the sample, in order for the
        theory of probability to apply it is necessary that a probability
        sampling technique be used.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2825-3

    A:  c)  each item in the population has an equal chance of being chosen.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2826-1

    A:  a.  Every person in the population has the same likelihood of being
            included in the sample.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2826-2

    A:  a.  the method of selection.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2827-1

    A:  c.  A sample must be reasonably large to be considered a random sample.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2829-1

    A:  a.  His sample is not random.  Those who eat elsewhere, i.e. those
            who live off campus, have no chance of being selected.  Thus, not
            every student has the same chance of being selected as every other
            and this makes the sample non-random.

        b.  There is no way of knowing whether the sample accurately represents
            or mirrors the population of students.  For some purposes it may,
            for others, maybe not.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2830-2

    A:  a.  Assign numbers to plants (1 - 200).  Draw a random sample of size 10
            using a random numbers table.  Simplest procedure is to use
            sampling with replacement.

        b.  Advantage is that common formulas for mean and variance apply,
            but it's a nuisance to have to number plants and use random
            selection.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2831-1

    A:  a)  I would roll a die or use a random numbers table or some other means
            of selecting 2 numbers between 1 and 6 so that each possible pair of
            values were equally likely.
        b)  Ordinarily the possibility of no one being present in the selected
            units should be covered by allowing time for repeat visits at other
            times of day.  If a procedure is adopted that allows substitution
            of other houses because the selected houses were empty between 1:00
            pm and 4:00 pm, the frame sampled is apt to be quite different - a
            frame consisting of households in which at least one member remains
            at home between 1 and 4.  Among others this would exclude households
            in which all members worked.
        c)  Sometimes income levels are higher for households living in corner
            houses.  If that were the case and samples were drawn over many sets
            of households like the above, it would be especially important to
            use random selection so that the complete collection of samples
            included a proper representation of corner households.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2833-2

    A:  False, depending upon the situation, a random sample can be taken with
        or without replacement.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2891-2

    A:  b. is not a representative sample of your college student body

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2902-1

    A:  A list or a description of every sampling unit in the universe is
        known as the sampling frame.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2904-1

    A:  b.  a sample is used instead of a population

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2904-3

    A:  b.  the difference between a population value and an estimate of that
            value.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2921-1

    A:  c.)  non-response, because responses would be collected during the
        daytime, women who work outside their homes during the daytime would
        not be represented in the sample.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


2922-1

    A:  The problem developed because the Digest relied on voluntary response
        and such samples are practically always biased.  The respondents repre-
        sented a subset of the population owning cars and telephones.  In 1936
        this was a limited group and represented a biased sample.  In addition
        those returning ballots represent a group with special interest and so
        would be more biased.  This was in no way a random or representative
        sample.

Back to review this question

Look at this question's identification

Back to this chapter's Contents


Return to the list of chapters

Return to Brian Schott @ GSU

Identification:

28-1

Based upon item submitted by R. Pruzek - SUNY at Albany
        Multiple Choice
BASICTERMS/STATS  BASICTERMS/PROB
        STATISTICS        PROBABILITY

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


36-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Short Answer
SCOPEOFINFERENCE  BASICTERMS/STATS  BASICTERMS/PROB
        RANDOMVARIABLES   EVENTS            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS        PROBABILITY

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 4    General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


721-3

Based upon item submitted by R. L. Stout & R. M. Paolino - Brown
        Multiple Choice
BASICTERMS/STATS
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


729-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
BASICTERMS/STATS  PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


729-3

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
POPULATION        BASICTERMS/STATS
        CONCEPT           STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


733-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
BASICTERMS/STATS  SAMPLE
        STATISTICS        SAMPLING

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General             Education           Psychology
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


743-2

Based upon item submitted by W. Federer - Cornell
        True/False
POPULATION        BASICTERMS/STATS
        CONCEPT           STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


744-1

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        True/False
BASICTERMS/STATS
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


746-2

Based upon item submitted by W. Federer - Cornell
        True/False
SAMPLE            BASICTERMS/STATS
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


777-2

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
BASICTERMS/REG    BASICTERMS/STATS
        I650A             REGRESSION        PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1131-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General             Education           Psychology

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1132-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General             Education           Psychology

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1132-2

Based upon item submitted by R. Shavelson - UCLA
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General             Education           Psychology

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1134-2

Based upon item submitted by R. Shavelson - UCLA
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General             Education           Psychology

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1136-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1141-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
DESIGN            CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General             Education           Psychology

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1142-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
EXPERDESIGN/TERM  DESIGN            CONCEPT
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1144-1

Based upon item submitted by R. Shavelson - UCLA
        Multiple Choice
EXPERDESIGN/TERM  CONCEPT           DESIGN
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1148-1

Based upon item submitted by R. Shavelson - UCLA
        Multiple Choice
EXPERDESIGN/TERM  DESIGN            CONCEPT
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1422-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Inglis
        Multiple Choice
CONFIDENCEINTERV  TYPE1ERROR
        ESTIMATION        CONCEPT           STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1425-2

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
CONFIDENCEINTERV  SCOPEOFINFERENCE
        ESTIMATION        CONCEPT           STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 4    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1426-2

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
CONFIDENCEINTERV
        SIMPLE/CI         ESTIMATION        CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 4    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1460-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLE/CI         SAMPLESIZE        STANDERROROFMEAN
        CONFIDENCEINTERV  ESTIMATION        CONCEPT
        STATISTICS        SAMPLING          DESCRSTAT/P
        PARAMETRIC

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1461-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLE/CI
        CONFIDENCEINTERV  ESTIMATION        CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General             Education

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1511-1

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        True/False
SIMPLE/CI         ESTIMATION/OTHER
        CONFIDENCEINTERV  ESTIMATION        CONCEPT
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 4    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1513-1

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
SAMPLESIZE        SIMPLE/CI
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS        CONFIDENCEINTERV
        ESTIMATION        CONCEPT

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1513-2

Based upon item submitted by J. L. Mickey -UCLA
        True/False
SIMPLE/CI         TYPE1ERROR        SAMPLESIZE
        CONFIDENCEINTERV  ESTIMATION        CONCEPT
        STATISTICS        SAMPLING

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1548-1

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        True/False
SAMPLESIZE        OTHER/CI
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS        CONFIDENCEINTERV
        ESTIMATION        CONCEPT

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1563-1

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        Short Answer
SIMPLERANDOM      SAMPLE            POPULATION
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS
        CONCEPT

T=10    Comprehension
D= 4    General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1564-2

Based upon item submitted by W. Federer - Cornell
        True/False
SAMPLE            POPULATION
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS        CONCEPT

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1565-1

Based upon item submitted by D. Michener - UNH
        Definition
POPULATION
        I650E             CONCEPT           STATISTICS
        I650/TEMPORARY    MISCELLANEOUS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1573-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Numerical Answer
CENTRALLIMITTHM
        CONCEPT           STATISTICS

T= 5    Computation
D= 4    General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1727-2

Based upon item submitted by J. Mowbray - Shippensburg State
        Essay
OPERATIONALFAULT  SCOPEOFINFERENCE
        COMMONPITFALLS    TYPICALSUMMARY    APPLICATIONEX
        NONSAMPLINGERROR  SAMPLING          STATISTICS
        CONCEPT           MISCELLANEOUS

T=10    Comprehension   Application
D= 2    Sociology           General             Social Sciences

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1789-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Short Answer
NONRESPONSE       PROPORTION
        COMMONPITFALLS    NONSAMPLINGERROR  SAMPLING
        STATISTICS        DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC
        MISCELLANEOUS

T= 5    Application
D= 4    General             Social Sciences     Education

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1832-1

Based upon item submitted by W. Beyer - Univ. of Akron
        Numerical Answer
VARIANCE/OTHER    MEAN
        DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T=20    Computation
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1870-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Short Answer
SIMPLERANDOM      VARIABILITY/P
        EXPERDESIGN/TERM  I650C             PROBABILITYSAMPL
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS        DESCRSTAT/P
        PARAMETRIC        CONCEPT           ANOVA
        SCOPEOFINFERENCE

T= 5    Comprehension   Application
D= 5    General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1893-3

Based upon item submitted by D. Halley - Virginia Polytechnic Univ.
        Short Answer
STANDARDDEVIATIO
        I650I             DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T=10    Comprehension
D= 4    General
                ***Calculator Necessary***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1908-4

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        Multiple Choice
VARIANCE
        DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 5    Computation
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1911-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
VARIANCE
        SAMPLE            DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS        SAMPLING

T= 5    Computation
D= 2    General
                ***Calculator Necessary***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1952-1

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
VARIANCE          SAMPLESIZE
        DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS
        SAMPLING

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


1961-1

Based upon item submitted by B. Weir - N. C. State & Massey Univ.
        Multiple Choice
STANDERROROFMEAN
        DESCRSTAT/P       PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Computation     Comprehension
D= 2    General
                ***Calculator Necessary***
                ***Statistical Table Necessary***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2629-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Short Answer
TREATMENTASSIGN   SIMPLERANDOM      EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2726-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2748-1

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2749-1

Based upon item submitted by W. Federer - Cornell
        True/False
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2752-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        I650C             ANOVA             PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2752-2

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        I650C             ANOVA             PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2753-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        I650C             ANOVA             PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2760-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        I650C             ANOVA             PARAMETRIC
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2766-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Warren - UNH
        Definition
EXPERDESIGN/TERM
        ANOVA             PARAMETRIC        STATISTICS
        I650C

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2813-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Essay
PROBSAMPCONCEPT   SAMPLING          SAMPLE
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Fill-in
SAMPLE            SAMPLING
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-3

Item is still being reviewed
        Fill-in
SAMPLE            SAMPLING
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2814-4

Item is still being reviewed
        Fill-in
SAMPLE            SAMPLING
        STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2820-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLINGERROR
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2822-1

Based upon item submitted by A. Bugbee - UNH
        Short Answer
SIMPLERANDOM      PROBSAMPCONCEPT
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2822-3

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        True/False
ACCURACY          PROBSAMPCONCEPT
        NONSAMPLINGERROR  SAMPLING          STATISTICS
        PROBABILITYSAMPL

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2823-3

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        True/False
PROBSAMPCONCEPT
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2824-3

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
PROBSAMPCONCEPT   SAMPLE
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General
1                                                                        Page 2825

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2825-1

Item is still being reviewed
        True/False
PROBSAMPCONCEPT
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2825-3

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLERANDOM
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2826-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLERANDOM
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 1    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2826-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLERANDOM
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General             Education

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2827-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SIMPLERANDOM
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General             Education

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2829-1

Based upon item submitted by J. Mowbray - Shippensburg State
        Short Answer
SIMPLERANDOM      MISCELLANEOUS
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 2    General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2830-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Short Answer
RANDOMNUMBERS/S   SIMPLERANDOM
        I650I             SAMPLING          STATISTICS
        PROBABILITYSAMPL

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 3    General             Biological Sciences Natural Sciences
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2831-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Short Answer
SIMPLERANDOM      NONRESPONSE
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS
        NONSAMPLINGERROR

T=10    Application     Comprehension   Computation
D= 4    Social Sciences     General
                ***Multiple Parts***

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2833-2

Based upon item submitted by J. L. Mickey -UCLA
        True/False
SIMPLERANDOM
        PROBABILITYSAMPL  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2891-2

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SAMPLE            CONVENIENCE/CHUN
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2902-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Fill-in
FRAME
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2904-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
SAMPLINGERROR
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 3    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2904-3

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
PRECISION         SAMPLINGERROR
        SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 4    General             Education

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2921-1

Item is still being reviewed
        Multiple Choice
NONRESPONSE
        NONSAMPLINGERROR  SAMPLING          STATISTICS

T= 2    Comprehension
D= 2    General             Social Sciences

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


2922-1

Based upon item submitted by W. J. Hall - Univ. of Rochester
        Short Answer
NONRESPONSE
        I650I             NONSAMPLINGERROR  SAMPLING
        STATISTICS

T= 5    Comprehension
D= 4    General

Back to review this question

Back to this chapter's Contents


Return to the list of chapters

Return to Brian Schott @ GSU