In Memoriam

Robert Lado

Dean (1961-1973)

School of Languages and Linguistics

Georgetown University


Other tributes will be added to this page as we receive them.


From Joseph Lado

Posted to TESLJB-L (TESLJB-L@CUNYVM.BITNET)
Date: Thu, 14 Dec 1995 17:11:42 -0500
From: Joseph Lado (www.ladoent.com)
Subject: Dr. Robert Lado 1915-1995

Dr.Robert Lado: educator, author, dean of Georgetown University School of Languages and Linguistics, devoted husband, loving father of ten and "abuelo" of twenty grandchildren died December 11 of cardiac arrest in Bethesda Md.

Dr. Lado was Dean of Georgetown University School of Languages and Linguistics for thirteen years from 1960 until 1973, and was Professor of Linguistics at Georgetown University until his retirement as Professor Emeritus in 1980. Dr. Lado was internationally known for his pioneering research and texts in linguistics, language testing and early reading as well as for his best selling series of text books for teaching English as a second language.

Born on May 31,1915 in Tampa, Florida, to Spanish immigrants, he emigrated to Spain before learning to speak English. At age 21 he returned to the United States and learned English as an adult, developing understanding and sensitivity to the challenges confronting immigrants learning English as a second language.

Dr. Lado received his B.A. from Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, his M.A. from the University of Texas at Austin, and his Ph. D. from the University of Michigan. He was Professor of English and Director of the University of Michigan English Language Institute.

Dr. Lado obtained a Ford-Fulbright Foundation grant to establish English departments at five universities in Spain and has cooperated with universities in Latin America. He has written over 100 articles and nearly 60 books. Dr. Lado was a tireless champion of cross-cultural communication and understanding and a linguist of international stature. He travelled extensively lecturing on linguistics and has received world-wide recognition and acclaim. He has received honorary Doctorates from Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan and Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Lado was founder and President of the Lado International College, where he built a successful business based on an academically rigorous English education program for speakers of other languages. The Lado International College has three centers in the Washington metropolitan area, and centers in Orlando, Florida, Wheeling, West Virginia, Tokyo, Japan, and Lima, Peru.

Dr. Lado is survived by his loving wife of 45 years, Lucia Andrade Lado, his ten children: Lucy, Robert, Ana, Rosemary, Margaret, John, Victor, Joseph, Francis and Maria and their spouses: Janet Lewis, Joseph Ready, Paolo Ferreira, Joseph Schepis, Carmen Vales, Lavonne Weinke and Renee Montoya, twenty grandchildren, his sister Dolores of Madrid, Spain, his brothers Calixto and Ernest and his sisters-in-law Armandita and Isabel of Florida.

Dr. Lado was a member of the Church of the Little Flower parish in Bethesda, Md. and was active in support of the Spanish Catholic Center of Washington, D.C. He was a volunteer in programs for the poor and in literacy work in the Spanish/Portuguese community. At Centro Catolico Hispano he trained volunteer teachers and conducted work at various Hispanic schools in the Washington metropolitan area. He was awarded the Medal of Honor by the DAR of the District of Columbia in recognition of his leadership, service and patriotism.

Dr. Lado was an outstanding teacher, researcher, educator, linguist, college administrator, writer, world traveler and scholar. His enthusiasm, energy, charisma, motivation and generosity, along with his readiness to instruct and his willingness to serve and love God, his family, his fellow man, his community and his country have made him an inspiration for a generation of students and educators. Death Notice

On December 11, 1995, of cardiac arrest in Bethesda, Md. He is survived by his loving wife of 45 years, Lucia Andrade Lado, his ten children: Lucy, Robert, Ana, Rosemary, Margaret, John, Victor, Joseph, Francis and Maria and their spouses: Janet Lewis, Joseph Ready, Paolo Ferreira, Joseph Schepis, Carmen Vales, Lavonne Weinke and Renee Montoya, twenty grandchildren, his sister Dolores of Madrid, Spain, his brothers Calixto and Ernest and his sisters-in-law Armandita and Isabel of Florida.

Viewing will be held at DeVol Funeral Home at 2222 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. Washington, D.C. on Friday December 15 between 2 pm and 4 pm and between 7 pm and 9 pm. Funeral will be held at the Church of the Little Flower 5607 Massachusetts Ave. Bethesda, Md on Saturday December 16 at 10 am.

Donations may be made in remembrance of Dr. Lado to the Spanish Catholic Center, Dr. Robert Lado Memorial Fund, P O Box 11450 Washington, D.C. 20008.


Obituary: Washington Post (December 14, 1995)

Robert Lado Dies at 80; Linguist, Georgetown Dean

Robert Lado, 80, the first dean of the school of languages and linguistics at Georgetown University and a former professor of linguistics at Georgetown, died of cardiac arrest Dec. 11 at Suburban Hospital. He moved to Manor Care nursing facility in Bethesda after suffering a stroke last year.

Dr. Lado served on the Georgetown faculty from 1960 until retiring in 1980, and he was dean of the school of languages and linguistics from 1961 to 1973. In retirement, he had continued to teach part time at Georgetown. He wrote more than 100 articles and 60 books on languages and linguistics.

In 1978, he founded Lado International College, which specializes in teaching English to speakers of other languages. It has three centers in the Washington Area and branches in Wheeling, W. VA., Orlando, Tokyo and Lima, Peru.

Dr. Lado was born in Tampa to Spanish immigrant parents. He grew up in Spain, then returned to the United States and graduated from Rollins College. He received a master's degree in linguistics education from the University of Texas and a doctorate in that discipline from the University of Michigan. He was on the faculty at Michigan before joining the faculty at Georgetown.

Supported by Ford Foundation grants and Fulbright fellowships, Dr. Lado helped establish English departments at five universities in Spain.

He was a member of the Catholic Church of the Little Flower in Bethesda, and he did volunteer work at the Spanish Catholic Center in Washington. He had received the medal of honor of the Daughters of the American Revolution of the District of Columbia.

Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Lucia Andrade Lado of Bethesda; 10 children, Lucy Lado Monserate of Orlando, Robert Lado of Olney, Ana Lado Ready of Alexandria, Rosemary Lado Ferreira of Arlington, Margaret Lado Schepis of Bethesda, John Lado of Rockville, Victor Lado of Washington, Joseph Lado of Arlington, Francis Lado of Gaithersburg and Maria Lado of Boston; his sister, Dolores Lado vda. de Penas of Madrid; two brothers, Calixto Lado and Ernest Lado, both of Florida; and 20 grandchildren.


Obituary: Blue & Gray (January 8-21, 1996)

First SLL Dean Dies

Robert Lado, long-time professor and first dean of Georgetown's School of Languages and Linguistics, died Dec. 11 after a long illness. He was 80.

Formerly an English professor at the University of Michigan, Lado came to Georgetown in 1960 to direct the Institute of Languages and Linguistics, then part of the School of Foreign Service. Within the first year of his stewardship, the Institute became an official school of Georgetown University and Lado became dean.

"He was a remarkable man. He was a giant in his field on whose shoulders many of us have stood over the years," said James E. Alatis, professor and dean emeritus of what is now known as the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics.

During his distinguished academic career, Lado successfully juggled teaching, research, administrative and consulting responsibilities, Alatis said, crediting Lado as his mentor.

After becoming dean in 1961, Lado turned his many talents and energies to making the School of Languages and Linguistics the premier program of its kind. Course offerings and degree opportunities were expanded, with the school growing from 147 bachelor of science degree candidates and 31 master's degree candidates in 1959-60 to 652 bachelor's degree candidates and 337 master's and doctoral candidates in 1971-72. Lado resigned as dean in 1973, returning to full-time teaching and research until retiring in 1980. He continued to teach part time until 1985, marking his 70th birthday and 25th year at Georgetown.

Born in Tampa, Fla., Lado earned his bachelor's degree from Rollins College, his master's degree from the University of Texas at Austin and his doctorate from the University of Michigan. He began his academic career at the University of Michigan where he was director of the English Language Institute.

(Reprinted by permission from Blue & Gray, Georgetown University newsletter for faculty and staff)


A tribute by Larry Selinker

SENT TO LTEST-L DISCUSSION LIST
Subj: LADO AND SECOND LG ACQU.

Robert Lado was in some sense the indirect father of SLA, thru his contrastive analysis statements:

the learner tends to transfer...

Lado had his students go out and empirically test that and here is where I came in: my views of interlanguage are in essence an amalgam of this experience (my phd in lg transfer was with him at Georgetown in 1966) and a post doc Fulbright year with Corder in Edinburgh in 68-69.

What I want to say is something about his character. All thru grad school I knew the contrastive analysis thing was wrong and said so in many classes; the linguistics of Chomksy which undermined his Fries' linguistics helped and we younguns were not too kind. I think my dissertation showed this to him clearly, but he very graciously accepted it.

I was part of the unfortunate movement that threw out the contr. analysis baby and bathwater and all. I tried to make this up to him in Rediscovering IL by taking his extremely stated statements and turning them, by a rhetorical trick, into hypotheses about SLA and IL grammar, the way it might work, and tried to show how rich a theory he really had.

So, in planning memorials to Lado, we should also think about his work in the widest sense, not only in lg testing.

cheers, Larry

Larry Selinker
Department of Applied Linguistics, Birkbeck College, University of London
43 Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0PD UK
l.selinker@app-ling.bbk.ac.uk; 44-171-631-6154; FAX: 44-171-383-3729
http://www.bbk.ac.uk/Departments/AppliedLinguistics/Larry.html