Action Plan for the University Strategic Plan


 



     

2005 Action Plan Progress Report - Academic Programs & Faculty

Recruitment & Retention of Students | Undergraduate Experience | Graduate Experience & Research | Academic Programs & Faculty | Connection to the Greater Community | Infrastructure/Support Improvements

The campus welcomed 82 new tenure-track faculty at the New Faculty Orientation in August. We were finally able to make progress in increasing the number of tenure track faculty to a level above that of twenty years ago.

The Regents approved the following new degree programs: BA in Women's Studies, MA in Gerontology and in Religious Studies, MPH (Master of Public Health), DPT (Doctorate of Physical Therapy). A joint JD/MS in City and Regional Planning with Georgia Tech was approved. Also, multiple certificate programs were approved. The first doctoral degree recipient in Communication Studies was hooded at the spring commencement. The first class of masters in public health was enrolled in fall 2004. As a result of both short-term and long-term processes for review of academic programs, three bachelor degree programs were deactivated: BS in Recreation, BS in Human Resources Policy & Development, and BA in Theatre.

Academic Program Review is progressing steadily through efforts spearheaded by the Associate Provost for Institutional Effectiveness. The provost approved Action Plans for the departments of Applied Linguistics, Art & Design, Communications, Criminal Justice, Economics, Finance, Geology, Modern & Classical Languages, and Philosophy. Commitments for funding Action Plans are $2.9 million for years up to FY 05 and upwards of $3.2 million for future years.

Another strategic planning endeavor during 2003-2004 was the Areas of Focus initiative, which sought to concentrate reallocated resources and new resources, as available, in partnership-driven programs of strategic importance to Georgia State and with leveraging potential by virtue of location in Atlanta . The call for pre-proposals produced 14 potential areas of focus: acquisition of language and literacy, brains and behavior, collaborative arts and research, entrepreneurship, global Atlanta/transnational processes-local context, global commerce, law and ethics in health, international excellence in public finance, metropolitan growth and the physical environment, molecular basis of disease, risk and its management, urban education research, urban health research, and the urban South.

A blue ribbon committee of distinguished faculty representing all colleges of the university narrowed the original entries to seven, which upon agreement by the Fiscal Advisory Committee to the President, were resubmitted as full proposals. These seven were: acquisition of language and literacy, brains and behavior, international excellence in public finance, metropolitan growth and the physical environment, molecular basis of disease, risk and its management, and urban health research.

Using review criteria refined through a series of exchanges between the blue ribbon committee and the Fiscal Advisory Committee to the President, the committee recommended three areas of focus for funding: urban health research, brains and behaviors, and molecular basis of disease. These recommendations were accepted with $4.4 million in reallocated funds staged over 3 fiscal years to fund the first area in full and the latter two partially. Beyond the funded areas, there were benefits derived from inter-disciplinary discussions among faculty in different departments and colleges, which could lead to productive collaborations with potential for significant funding from external sources.

Georgia State continued to elevate its regional, national and international reputation among universities. The Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics won the 2003 Prize for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs from the American Philosophical Association and the Philosophy Documentation Center , in recognition of the intellectual content of outreach programs targeted at non-traditional audiences. The sixth and final telescope of the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) came on-line, signaling the completion of the core facility at Mount Wilson . Remote operation from Atlanta facilitated operation of the telescopes every clear night.

The J. Mack Robinson College of Business collected a number of noteworthy rankings from the annual U.S. News & World Report survey of colleges and universities. The undergraduate programs in business ranked 25 th among public institutions and in the top 50 among all institutions. The Risk Management & Insurance program ranked first among public institutions and second overall. The Management Information Systems program ranked fifth among public institutions and eighth overall. The Real Estate program ranked eighth among public institutions and tenth overall. The FLEX (part-time) MBA program ranked third among public universities and seventh overall. In addition, Business Week and Financial Times ( London ) rated the Executive MBA program among the best in the world.

The Cardiopulmonary Care (Respiratory Therapy) undergraduate program ranked first in a national survey of departments of cardiopulmonary care sciences.

The College of Law remained the youngest law school in the top 100 law schools listed by U.S. News & World Report . The National Jurist ranked the College of Law among the "best schools for your money" and also cited the college as the 11 th most wired law school in the nation.

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, in only its eighth year of operation, received recognition from U .S. News & World Report as well. The overall school advanced five places from three years ago to 26 th . The Public Finance and Banking program ranked fifth nationally. The City Management and Urban Policy program ranked 12 th . The Public Management Administration program ranked 16 th . The Public Policy Analysis program ranked 21 st .

The University Library has been elected at the Associate Member level of the Center for Research Libraries. An indication of support for academic programs through library acquisitions is given in Table 16. The library has responded to the rapid expansion of journals available in electronic format and to a high rate of inflation for serials through a series of strategies. These strategies include cooperative purchase of some online databases (Dow Jones, Science Direct, Web of Science, and Wiley Interscience), transfer of paper subscriptions to electronic, reduction of book budgets, and cancellation of serials through a comprehensive serials review process.

An indication of support for academic programs through library acquisitions is given in Table 16. The library has responded to the rapid expansion of journals available in electronic format and to a high rate of inflation for serials through a series of strategies. These strategies include cooperative purchase of some online databases (Dow Jones, Science Direct, Web of Science, and Wiley Interscience), transfer of paper subscriptions to electronic, reduction of book budgets, and cancellation of serials through a comprehensive serials review process.

Georgia State University successfully nominated five of its faculty for the Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scientists program.

Faculty Support & Development

Recommendations of two task forces on advancement of women and on recruitment and retention of under-represented faculty are being implemented with strategies including pilot mentoring programs. Efforts continue to be spearheaded by Senior Faculty Associates dedicated to each area and working on behalf of the Provost office. Table 17 indicates faculty diversity. The number of African-American and Asian faculty continues to increase.

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