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March 30, 1864—pg. 4

GENERAL WAR NEWS.
Our Forces at Paducah.
By Telegraph to The Republican.
     Our forces under Col Hicks, at Paducah, Ky., comprised the first battalion of the 16th Illinois regiment, numbering 300 raw recruits, under Maj Barnes, and three companies of the 112th Illinois, 1200 strong, under Maj Chapman, and 250 of the 1st Kentucky heavy artillery, colored, under Lieut Cunningham. The steamer Dakotah, which was burned at the Marine railroad, was owned by Capt Johnson of Paducah. Wolfe & Brothers estimate their loss by plundering at $25,000.
     Forrest, with a force estimated at 7000 men, was reported within eight miles of Columbus, Ky., Monday night. They cut the telegraph between Columbus and Cairo Monday night. They reported that only 200 prisoners were captured with Col Hawkins, and parties of them were escaping every day.
Military Divisions of Kentucky.
TRAIN ATTACKED BY GUERRILLAS.
By Telegraph to The Republican.
     In pursuance of directions from Gen Schofield and in accordance with Gen Grant’s orders, Kentucky has been divided into two military districts. The western district comprises all between the Nashville railroad and the Cumberland river under Gen Ewing, with headquarters on the railroad. The eastern division comprises all between the Nashville railroad and Big Sandy river, under Gen Hobson, with headquarters in the field. The whole is to be under Gen Burbridge, headquarters at Louisville. That part of Kentucky west of the Cumberland river belongs to the department of Tennessee.
     Gen Vaughan has been appointed provost marshal of Louisville.
     The express train which left Louisville, Monday, for Lebanon, was captured by 10 guerrillas, and 10 cars burned. A squad of 17 federal soldiers on the train surrendered without firing a gun.
Reports about Longstreet.
By Telegraph to The Republican.
     Federal scouts have proceeded four miles beyond Bull’s gap, and report no signs of Longstreet’s force.
     The Chattanooga Gazette says the rebels claim to have 15,000 men at Dalton and vicinity, and that they will capture Chattanooga and occupy Tennessee when Longstreet moves into Kentucky, which they say he will do forthwith with 26,000 men. All the heavy artillery is being removed from Kinston to Dalton. The rebel Gen Johnston has restricted his officers from major generals down to one horse.
Army of the Potomac.
REVIEWS BY GEN GRANT TUESDAY.
By Telegraph to The Republican.
     Gen Grant, accompanied by Gen Meade, reviewed the 1st corps of the army of the Potomac, now a portion of the 5th corps, Tuesday morning, near Culpepper. While passing along the line they were greeted with the most enthusiastic cheers. Gen Merritt’s cavalry division was also reviewed, the whole presenting a fine appearance. The 2d corps was to have been reviewed Tuesday afternoon, but a heavy rain storm set in and the review was postponed.
THE NEW COMMANDERS.
     Washington telegrams speak of such a “pressure” on the president for the removal of Gen Meade that he can no longer disregard it, and that Gen Hooker is much talked of as his successor. The consolidation of the 3d army corps with the others created much dissatisfaction among its officers and men. They claim to have won the reputation of the fighting corps of the army of the Potomac, having participated in every battle fought by it. Hooker’s and Kearney’s divisions, which did most of the hard fighting on the peninsula, and in other battles fought by that army, belonged to the 3d corps.
     The 5th army corps, of which Maj Gen Warren is commander, has as division commanders Brig Gens Wadsworth, Crawford, Robinson, Griffin, Ayres, Cutter, Baxter, Bartlett, James[,] Barnes, Rice. The 2d corps, Maj Gen Hancock commanding, has these division commanders: Brig Gen Barlow, Gibbon, Birney, Barr. The 6th corps, Maj Gen Sedgwick commanding has as division commanders, Brig Gens Wright, Getty, Prince.
Rebel Plan of Campaign.
THE GREAT CAMPAIGN TO BE IN THE WEST.
     The Washington correspondent of the N. Y. World reports intelligence from Richmond that the rebel plans for the coming campaign have been formed with a view to the reclamation of Tennessee and Kentucky to the confederate rule. The military leaders appear to have determined not to do what General Grant would like to have them do; they will not make the chief object of the campaign to hold Richmond. That city has been strongly fortified, and Jeff Davis and Bragg believe that a comparatively small force will be able to make a long stand against the army of Grant. In the meantime the great bulk of the confederate forces will be massed in the West, and when the season for low water in the Cumberland and the Tennessee shall arrive, a bold push will be made with three objects: 1, to capture the garrison at Chattanooga and recover East Tennessee; 2, to reach the Ohio river and establish control over a section of country from which ample supplies may be drawn; and 3, to again close the Mississippi river and restore communication with the country beyond. It is predicted, therefore, by the rebel sympathizers that General Grant will encounter little serious opposition until he shall reach the fortifications of Richmond, which, as has been stated, are relied upon to resist a long siege and enable the rebels to carry out their plans at the West. It is probable that Generals Lee and Johnston will exchange places; and that the former for the third time will essay the offensive.
Credits of Re-Enlisted Veterans.
     Provost Marshal General Fry says that the muster in of re-enlisted veterans is made in the field by the regimental and company officers, and the United States commissary of musters, under the general direction of the adjutant general of the army. The muster in rolls are made, signed and certified by the regimental and company officers and United States commissary of musters. These rolls belong to and are filed in the adjutant general’s department of the army. All questions, propositions or inquiries in regard to them should be presented to the adjutant general (Major Vincent’s office), and not to the provost marshal general. The credits for re-enlisted veterans are made up by the adjutant general from the muster in rolls above referred to, and when so made up the numbers to be credited, are reported by the adjutant general of the army to the provost marshal general [unreadable final line].
Col Dahlgren and his Men.
     Admiral Dahlgren has gone up the James river again under flag of truce, to make another effort to recover the body of his son, Col Dahlgren. The excuse given by the rebels that they do not know where the body is buried is believed to be false.

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     The surgeon of the 2d New York cavalry, who accompanied Col Dahlgren and was taken prisoner, but now released, states that in the fight at Richmond, on Monday afternoon, Col Dahlgren’s forces drove the rebels over two miles and inside the second line of fortifications. We lost five men killed and several wounded, and punished the rebels severely. The surgeon was left behind to care for the wounded, and in endeavoring to rejoin Col Dahlgren was captured by the 2d North Carolina, into whose lines he rode, supposing them to be our troops. He was taken to Richmond, placed in a close cell with Col Cook, Col Litchfield—who was wounded as stated—three other officers, and four negroes. From Col Cook, who was at Col Dahlgren’s side, he learned that forty or fifty shots were fired, and that Col Dahlgren fell from his horse, dead. The rest tried to save themselves, but were nearly all captured. The most severe treatment was given to these officers. They were fed on corn-bread and water, and subjected to insults.
Miscellaneous.
     The paroled prisoners at Annapolis were paid off on Monday, and a large number of the officers left on twenty days’ leave of absence for the North. Many sick arrived by the last boat, of whom eight or ten have died, and probably some fifty more will share their fate.
     The committee on the conduct of the war will in their report completely exonerate President Lincoln from all responsibility for the recent defeat in Florida. The evidence adduced clearly shows that he neither ordered, counselled, or was cognizant of the movement that so disastrously culminated at Olustee.
     Among the prisoners recently released from the Libby prison is Capt E. Szabad, formerly of Gen Fremont’s staff, and later of Gen Sickle’s. He kept and brought away with him, a complete diary of his prison life, which he will print.
     On the night of the 22d, twelve rebel prisoners made their escape from White Oak prison, Camp Douglas, and have not yet been retaken. They took up the floor and dug out.
     Judge Pearson of North Carolina, in a second habeas corpus case, has decided that the recent act of the rebel congress to conscript persons who have furnished substitutes for the war is unconstitutional.
     A letter from Knoxville says it is currently reported in the army there that Gen Burnside is to resume his late command, and that the boys are very hopeful that the rumor may turn out true.
     The steamers in St Cloud and Perry arrived at Cairo Tuesday, from Memphis the 27th. The St Cloud had 450 bales of cotton.
     The 27th Wisconsin and 40th Illinois regiments veterans, were at Cairo Tuesday, en route home.
     One hundred and fourteen soldiers in charge of the sanitary commission, arrived at Cairo Tuesday on the steamer Thomas from New Orleans. Five died on the passage.
     Cotton at Memphis was higher on the 27th, middling to strict 57@58c, good middling 60 @ 62c.
CONGRESS.
By Telegraph to The Republican.
Washington, Tuesday night, March 29.
Senate.
     Mr Cowan of Pa. introduced a bill, which was referred to the committee on naval affairs, to establish a navy yard and naval depot on the Delaware river. The bill provides for the selection of the location by a commission of seven scientific men, none of whom shall own land within fifty miles of the Delaware river. The decision of a majority of this commission, when approved by the secretary of the navy and the president, shall be final.
     The proceedings and resolutions of the House in reference to the death of the Hon Owen Lovejoy, late a member of the House from Illinois, were communicated to the Senate. Appropriate eulogies were delivered upon the deceased by Messrs Trumbull of Ill., Pomeroy of Kansas, and Sumner of Mass. The usual resolutions of respect and condolence were passed, and the Senate adjourned.
House.
     Mr Washburne of Ill. reported a bill, which was passed, from the committee on commerce, providing for the collection of hospital dues of vessels sold or transferred in foreign ports. The collections are to be made through consuls and commercial agents.
     Mr Stevens of Pa. said as several gentlemen desired to deliberately consider the proposed amendment to the constitution introduced by him, Monday to prohibit slavery in all the states and territories, he would move its postponement for two weeks.
     Mr Steven’s proposition was agreed to.
     Mr Rice of Mass., from the committee on naval affairs, reported a bill, which was passed, that persons between 26 and 30 years of age may be appointed assistant paymasters, provided the number is not thereby increased, and that examinations of students for admission into the naval academy shall take place when they are between 14 and 18 years of age.
     Mr Rice reported a bill, which was passed, regulating the old method of making promotions in the navy, and providing that instead of their being made according to seniority as hitherto, they shall be made according to official capacity and physical fitness, to be determined by a board of examination appointed by the president. Officers not recommended for promotion, are to have an opportunity to be heard, through a revisatory board. One of the sections also provides for the appointment of paymasters and engineers of fleets.
     Mr Rice reported a bill which was passed, fixing the date of the loss of the brig Bainbridge at the 21st of August, 1863, in order to fix the pensions of the deceased officers and sailors.
     Mr Rice reported a joint resolution which was passed, authorizing the secretary of the navy to sell at public auction lot 18 in the village of Sackett’s Harbor, N. Y., it not being required for the navy yard.
     Mr Pike of Me., from the naval committee, reported a bill which has passed authorizing during the present war the appointment of acting lieutenant commanders and commanders at the same rate of pay as was allowed to such grades in the regular navy.
     Mr Pike also reported the Senate bill regulating courts martial, which was passed, after striking out the first section, which provides that volunteer appointments in the navy shall be subject to the action of the Senate, the same as regular appointments. The House then went into committee for the whole on the bill amendatory of the national banking law.
     The amendment offered by Mr Hooper of Mass., on Friday, was agreed to. This amendment provides that banks with a capital of not less than $50,000, may, with the approval of the secretary of the treasury, be organized in any place, the population of which does not exceed 6000.
     Mr Boutwell of Mass. offered an amendment to strike out the authority proposed to be given to the banks to buy and sell gold and silver[,] coin and bullion, and loan money on real and permanent security. He said that these banks, with a circulation of $300,000,000 would be able to fix the standard of value, which was the very thing the House has been endeavoring to prevent.
     Mr Stevens of Pa. opposed the amendment. The section in dispute left these banks to buy the gold the same as the state banks and individuals. The time had passed for us to consider gold as currency. It was a commodity, the same as a bill of exchange.
     The amendment of Mr Boutwell was then rejected.
     Mr Brooks of N. Y. offered an amendment, the object of which was to prevent banking on real estate, which in New York had been found unsafe. In support of his amendment he said that it was useless for him to protest against a wrong principle of banking, and he referred to the fact that on a bill of such vast importance, the House was acting without the presence of a quorum.
     The amendment of Mr Brooks was rejected.
     An amendment was proposed and rejected, striking out the requirement that every director of a bank during his whole term of service shall be a citizen of the United State[s].
     The committee considered the bill up to the twenty-third section.
     On motion of Mr Ganson of N. Y. an amendment to the twenty-second section was adopted, authorizing the issue of bills of the denomination of one, two and three dollars.
     On motion of Mr Hooper of Mass. a proviso was added to the section to the effect that not more than one-sixth of the circulation furnished to any bank under this act shall be of a less denomination than five dollars, and that after specie payments shall have been removed no circulation.

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