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May 4, 1861—pg. 2

THE WAR.
     The City Guard came into possession of their new fatigue uniforms yesterday, and will parade with them to-day.
Western Massachusetts.
     The officers and soldiers of the war of 1812, in Franklin county, held a meeting at the American House in Greenfield, Wednesday; Gen Asa Howland of Conway was chosen president and Anson Bement of Ashfield secretary: and they adopted resolutions denouncing the rebellion and calling on the young men of Franklin county to forget all party names and rally to the support of the government.—D. N. Carpenter, postmaster of Greenfield has headed a subscription for the Greenfield Guards with $100. This subscription is intended as a contingent fund and is in addition to the appropriation of the town.—The military company in Belchertown is full and drilling regularly. The town has voted $5000 for war purposes.—Henry Stockbridge, brother of Levi Stockbridge of North Hadley, a prominent lawyer and chief judge of elections in Baltimore, writes that not being able to leave the city, he has been compelled to drill every day in secession ranks. He is a strong Union man but like hundreds of others, dare not openly avow his political sentiments.—The patriotism of Amherst, outside the colleges, is oozing out of the little end of the horn. The town meeting on Wednesday was thinly attended; it was voted however to authorize the select men to borrow $5000 and expend it on such soldiers as should actually be mustered into the United States service. An enlistment roll was opened in this town and received 14 signatures.—Quite a number of orders came to Worcester, Thursday, supplied of course. Worcester is all right.—Rev Mr Webber, of the North Congregational church in Worcester, has enlisted in the City Guard as a common soldier—Rutland voted on Thursday to appropriate $1000 for the families of those who shall be called into service from that town. Also, to pay each man a dollar a day while drilling, and enough with the government allowance to make it the same when called into service.—Shrewsbury will give each man a dollar a day while drilling, two days a week, for four weeks, and a dollar a day when in service. Provision was also made for the families of volunteers.—Ware has voted $5000 to arm and equip a company now forming there, and pay $1 a days [day] to each soldier while drilling and $20 to each man on his departure.
     Several hundred people assembled at Ludlow Center on Wednesday, to witness and celebrate the erection of a beautiful liberty pole, and its fitting decoration with the stars and stripes. Bells were rung, songs sung, and cannons fired on the occasion. Patriotic speeches were made in the church by Rev Simeon Miller, Rev Mr May, H. A. Hubbard and Rev Mr Leonard.
     A beautiful Union flag, presented by the ladies of the town, was raised amid enthusiastic ceremonies, at Wales on Saturday. Cheers were given, cannons fired, and patriotic speeches delivered.
     A flying artillery company is being formed in Adams. Twenty men have enlisted already, and four cannon have been sent for. It is designed the company shall consist of forty men, and the “needful” is being rapidly pledged.—Spirited meetings have been held at Lebanon Springs, and more than $6000 raised by subscription. Tilden & Co, manufacturers of medical extracts, gave $1000 and offer more if needed. Thirty-two have enlisted—the flower of the young men of the place.—Wm. W. Rockwell of New York, son of Judge Rockwell of Pittsfield, was so excited with patriotism when the Allen Guards went through New York, that he left to join them as soon as he could arrange his business.—John D. Durfee, son of Rev Mr Durfee of Williamstown, has left a lucrative clerkship in New York and gone to Washington with the Eighth regiment of that city. The blessing of the father goes with him.
     There will be a town meeting in Ludlow next Monday afternoon, to take measures to promote volunteering and to appropriate money for the support of soldiers.
     There was a large and enthusiastic town meeting in Old Deerfield on Thursday, at which $6000 was appropriated for fitting out a company of volunteers and the support of their families.
     The following resolutions were adopted unanimously by the Hampden East association of Congregational ministers, at their meeting in Chicopee on the 30th ult:--Resolved, that we entertain the deepest gratitude to God that he has been pleased to give the North in the present crisis of public affairs such a spirit of unanimity and mighty enthusiasm in favor of maintaining our general government at all hazards. Resolved, that the volunteers who shall go forth for the defense of our country have our sympathies and shall have our prayers that the divine blessing may rest upon them.
Eastern Massachusetts.
     Although a month has passed since the war spirit first began to be aroused in Boston, it is as great as ever. The people there want to do some real fighting, and are very anxious to go through Baltimore—At Marshfield, where the remains of Webster repose, a war fund of $5000 has been raised, a bounty of $11 is offered to each man who has enlisted or shall enlist.—Rodney French of New Bedford, who has a staunch whale-ship, built for a privateer in the war of 1812, has offered her to the general government, to be fitted up for the defense of our commerce. If this offer is declined he will offer her to this state, and will command her for three months without pay.
     Three of the Massachusetts congressional delegation are in the military service. Senator Wilson is in Devens’ rifle battalion at Annapolis or Washington, James Buffinton is an active member of one of the Fall River companies, now nearly ready to march, and Col Train has raised a company in Framingham and been elected commander.—Rev J. F. Ashley, pastor of the Baptist church in North Attleboro, has been elected captain of the volunteer company organized in that village. He is said to possess the requisites of a first-rate officer—Addison O. Whitney, one of the members of the Lowell City Guard killed at Baltimore, was twenty-two years of age. He was a spinner in the Middlesex mills, and was born at Bangor, Me. He has a sister living in Lowell. Luther C. Ladd, the other member of the Lowell City Guard, who was killed, was eighteen years of age. He was a machinist and was born at Alexandria, N. H. He was shot in the thigh.—A. G. Browne, Jr., the governor’s private secretary, has issued a circular stating that Gen Wm. Schouler, adjutant general of the state, is the proper officer to address concerning arms desired by companies of the volunteer militia; and also that the very great demand for muskets, both from this state and from other states, may compel the executive authorities unwillingly to postpone accommodating many new companies—Workmen are now engaged in repairing Fort Warren in Boston harbor. The Webster regiment are to be quartered there as soon as arrangements can be made for their reception. This regiment now numbers about 1000 men, and they have made arrangements for a corps of sixteen drummers. About two hundred of their uniforms are made.
     The Massachusetts eighth regiment at Washington having sent an address to the president the other day, stating that they were without uniforms suitable to appear on parade, and asking for a fatigue dress like that worn by the regular troops, in half an hour after the president sent a note granting the request, and saying: “Allow me now to express to you, and through you to the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the zeal, energy and gallantry, and especially for the great efficiency in opening the communication between the North and this city, displayed by you and them.”
     James M. Waitt of company A, 5th Massachusetts regiment in Fort Monroe, is missing; the probability is that he was lost overboard from the . . . [unreadable 2 ½ lines], have formed themselves into a volunteer company, numbering 72 men, and commanded by Capt Frederick Knight.—A few days since, as a man was riding through Byfield, having a small American flag attached to the harness of his horse, an aged woman ran out and pointing to the stars and stripes exclaimed: “Is that the flag you fight for?” Being answered in the affirmative, with uplifted hands she cried—“God bless you young man; never desert that flag. My husband fell fighting for it in the war of 1812, and as you love your country never desert that flag.”
     J. Brood of Ballston, N.Y. has received an order from Boston for a [unreadable two words] of hunting axes to be furnished to a Massachusetts company of flying artillery. They are to weigh about two pounds, to be well made, ground sharp, well polished, and stamped “Yankee Doodle.”—The fishermen at Cape Ann are leaving their schooners high and dry and mustering for service either by land or sea, they don’t care which. They say

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they would rather any day go a fighting than a fishing; it is easier work and not half so dangerous. They believe that statistics will show that more lives are lost in the fishing business, in proportion to the number employed, than in the bloodiest wars.
     The body of Sumner H. Needham, one of the three Baltimore victims, was delivered to the authorities of Lawrence, by the state officials at Boston, Friday, with appropriate ceremonies. The bodies of the two Lowell soldiers were privately delivered to their friends, Saturday morning.—John Brown, Jr, arrived in Boston, Thursday, from Albany. Rumor reports that he is forming a camp of negroes in the neighborhood of Harper’s Ferry.—Five hundred dollars have been presented to the town of Marblehead by G Howland Shaw of Boston, to aid the families of those who have volunteered from that town. A similar sum has been donated to the same town by another citizen of Boston, who requests his name to be suspended, and who will pay as much more if it shall be needed.
     The company of volunteers raised in Newburyport, under command of Capt J. P. L. Westcott, promises to be one of the most effective organizations in the northern army. The company numbers 08 rank and file, men of commanding h[e]ight, of temperate habits and wiry constitutions, who were selected from 630 recruits. They are all excellent marksmen, and will be armed with Colt’s breech-loading and revolving rifle, an appropriation to purchase which was made by the city government of Newburyport on Thursday evening. The cost of the rifles is $50 apiece. The company is fully officered, and uniformed in blue coats and drab pants, with white trimmings. They are also provided with a gray woolen fatigue dress. The fund of the company amounts to $6,000.
     A convict in the state prison at Charlestown, a German, of a fine military appearance, who is a well-educated man, and has some ten months to serve on a sentence for forgery, has written a letter to the warden, in which he states that he enlisted in the U. S. army in 1817. He was present at the siege of Vera Cruz, the battles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Cherubasco, Molina del Rey and Chepultepec, and at the capture of Mexico. He afterwards served in the Cherokee country and in Texas, and received an honorable discharge when his term of enlistment had expired. These facts are verified by official documents. He concludes his note by saying: “My very heart’s desire is to serve my adopted country once more.”
     Haverhill enthusiastically voted to raise $10,000, Thursday, for the assistance of volunteers and the support of their families. Two companies are now under drill in this town, and the ladies are assiduously engaged in preparing clothing for those already in the army and those expecting soon to go. Mr. Lee offered $1000 to the Haverhill volunteers for the scalp of Jeff Davis, which places him ahead of the government in offering a reward for traitors.
Connecticut.
     The Union Guards of Danielsonville, numbering over 80 men, have offered their services to the governor. They are under the command of Capt Granger, who has seen five years service in the army. These men are among the picked men of the state, and it is asserted that 40 of them can turn a double summersault, and perform other difficult gymnastic feats.—Wolcottville, has appropriated $4,500 for a war fund; the vote was unanimous, with a single exception—The Union Rifle Guard, the ninth company of volunteers formed and accepted at Hartford, have elected D. W. Leprell, captain, Oliver Burr, 1st lieutenant, and Alfred L Dickinson, 24 lieutenant.—A cavalry company is being formed in Chatham and Portland, and Jeremiah Taylor of Portland gives $500 towards equipping the company.
     Mr Sedgwick of Cornwall has given notice in the legislature that he shall introduce a bill to raise five regiments of negroes. He proposes to send them down South—Hotchkiss & Sons of Sharon have presented a rifled cannon to Gov Buckingham, for the use of the state troops, and a similar one to Gov Andrew of Massachusetts.—About forty of the Wesleyan university students at Middletown have formed a military company, and drill every day. They have offered themselves for immediate action, and it is expected they will soon be called into the field.
Rhode Island.
     The secretary of war has given notice that the United States naval academy at Annapolis will be transferred to Newport, R. I., immediately, and that Fort Adams will be taken possession of for that purpose. The midshipmen, numbering 151, are now aboard of the U. S. frigate Constitution at Brooklyn. The first or graduating class, which completes its fourth year in June, will, it is said, go into active service.—Rev James Cook Richmond, now of Wisconsin, has addressed a letter to the governor, offering his services as chaplain of the Rhode Island troops.
     The Rhode Island regiment is much admired and petted at Washington. On the occasion of the raising of the national flag over the patent office by the president, on Thursday, when the flag reached its position, the regiment which was drawn up in front of the building, gave nine tremendous cheers and the Wampanoag war whoop, topped by a tiger for the Union, and nine more for the stars and stripes. The crowd then took a hand, cheering the Rhode Island regiment, Gov Sprague, and Col Burnside, and concluded with a few miscellaneous ones of a patriotic order. This regiment is quartered in the patent office. The same day they were mustered into the service of the United States and took the oath, not a man refusing. The entire fifteen hundred men with hands upraised took the oath at once, and with military precision and action, sounding like one mighty voice. Tom Cotton, a Tipperary man, who has seen eleven years service in the British army, has been useful in drilling the men, and has been promoted to the rank of sergeant in the Providence artillery. Gov Sprague has sent home the following official dispatch:—“To the people of Rhode Island—The opportune arrival of the Rhode Island and other troops at Washi[n]gton has saved the capital. The government will do all that is necessary to protect themselves and save the Union, and will not call upon Rhode Island to exhaust resources until necessity compels it. The first and second detachments have arrived and received the unqualified praise of the president and the general-in-chief. The light battery of artillery will arrive to-morrow. As there is no immediate necessity for my presence here, I shall soon return to Rhode Island. Meantime, no further enrollment or expenditure are necessary. The secretary of war desires my acceptance of the position of general, but our constitution prohibits it. I am desirous of being where I can best serve the country. The officers and men of the Rhode Island regiment have conducted themselves like true soldiers. WM. SPRAGUE.”
Vermont.
      Thomas McDaniels of Bennington offers the governor of Vermont $10,000 in money at any time it may be needed for state purposes.—The Russell powder mills at Bennington, Vt., have started up again, and are running night and day to supply the government.
Maine.
     The[re] are 22,000 good army muskets in the United States arsenal at Augusta, Me. They have percussion locks, and the barrels can be rifled at small expense. They are of the same kind as those used in the Mexican war. The small town of Somerville furnishes volunteers to the extent of one-fourth of all the voters.—An attempt was made to blow up the Portland powder magazine Thursday afternoon. It will be more carefully watched in future.
New Hampshire.
     President Lord of Dartmouth college, who has always been a southern man in sentiment, has come round and taken a firm stand for the government and the Union.
Other States.
     The Union-loving citizens of Delaware . . .[unreadable half-line] government and active in defending theirs. The National Guards of Wilmington have gone to Philadelphia to serve under Gen Patterson. There was much excitement at Wilmington this week from reports that traitors were about, and that a rebel attack would be made on the Dupont powder works. The Home Guards were ordered out, but their services were found to be unnecessary. The neighborhood is well guarded, and a strict surveillance is kept upon all suspicious strangers.
     An elegant silk standard was presented to the Sprague cadets at Cleveland, Ohio, the other day, after they had been mustered into the service of the government, the presentation being made by Mrs Audros B Stone, formerly of this city.—Two sons of Henry B. Stanton of Seneca Falls, N. Y., once will known in this state as an anti-slavery orator, have enlisted. On the mother’s side they are descendants of Col Livingston, who figured in the war of the revolution.
     Ex-president Buchanan has subscribed $5000

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for the equipment of volunteers at Lancaster, Pa.—Gerrit Smith made a strong war speech at a Union meeting in Syracuse the other night. He said he had not given up his peace doctrines, but he was for putting down traitors in the quickest and most radical way, and he was ready to do his part in support of the government, more especially as he considered the war a death blow to slavery.—A young Kentuckian enlisted at Madison, Indiana, the other day. He had walked over one hundred and fifty miles of Kentucky soil to volunteer.
     The Rochester volunteer regiment of nine full companies left that city for Elmira, the point of rendezvous for the western New York troops, on Friday morning. the city has appropriated $10,000 for the regiment, and the citizens have subscribed $40,000 for their families.
     W. W. Peck, a Chicago reporter, having arrived at Annapolis while the railroad was disabled, shouldered his carpet bag and walked to Washington in two days. On his arrival he enlisted in the army, and then called on the president and sought and obtained an officer’s commission.
Virginia.
     There seems to be no doubt that Jefferson Davis will soon appear in person in Virginia, to take charge of the grand southern army, collecting there, to operate in finishing the secession of that state, and defending it against the movements of the general government. The southern plan of attacking Washington is doubtless given up for the present—they will have enough to do, for the month of May, at least, in holding Virginia, and putting her safely through the revolution that she is involved in.
     A Kentucky regiment of 400 is on its way to Lynchburg.—The governor has determined to station a large number of troops in Petersburg.—Dumfries, about 45 miles below Washington, near the Potomac, is still reported to be determined on for a large concentration of southern troops.
     The destruction of the arms and machinery at the Harper’s Ferry Armory, in order to save them from the rebels, was not so complete, as has been supposed. The fire did not touch one large depot which contained 8000 stand of first-class arms, and the entire machinery of the armory is in as good order to-day as it ever was. Lt Jones and his little band of loyal soldiers have, however, the credit of doing the best they could, in their limited time and with their small force.
     Though the state convention forbade any election, on the 24th inst.—the regular time—for members of the federal Congress, the Union men of the state will probably pay no attention to the order, but vote for and elect a full set of Union congressmen on that day, who will be recognized at Washington on the assembling of Congress in July.
North Carolina.
     The legislature met in extra session[s] at Raleigh on the 1st, and at once and unanimously passed a bill to call a state convention, to assemble on the 20th, for the avowed purpose of passing the state over to the southern confederacy. The executive is already acting in full sympathy with the rebels, and the southern flag waves over the capitol. The governor has organized a military camp for instruction at Raleigh, and recommends the raising of ten regiments of volunteers to serve during the war. Gov Ellis says the northern government is now concentrating a large force in the District of Columbia, ostensibly to protect the seat of government, but such a force cannot be allowed to remain within the limits of Maryland and on the borders of Virginia, without seriously endangering the liberties of the people of those states. If they be conquered and overrun, North Carolina will become the next prey to the invaders. Policy, then, as well as sympathy and a feeling of brotherhood, engendered by a common interest, requires us to exert our energies in the defense of Maryland and Virginia. Every battle fought there will be a battle fought in behalf of North Carolina, and there our troops should be speedily sent. Adj Gen Hoke, in an army order, calling out the regiments, says the seat of war is its destination, and Virginia, in all probability, will be the first battle ground.
Gen Wool Snubbed by Gen Scott.
     The temporary cutting off of communication with Washington has been the cause of a misunderstanding between Gen Wool and the powers at Washington, and Gen Scott has ordered Gen Wool back from New York to Troy. Gen Wool, impelled by his own anxiety and the urgency of the people, took the liberty to purchase and forward army supplies to Washington without special orders. Gen Scott requests him to avoid this in future, and suggests the infirmity of Gen Wool’s health as a reason why he should return to Troy and devote himself to the ordinary routine duties of his department and the recovery of his health. The “union defense committee” of New York, with whom Gen Wool has been co-operating in hastening forward men and supplies, and the friends of Gen Wool, naturally feel aggrieved by this damper on their enthusiasm, but it is apparent enough that Gen Scott finds it necessary to insist upon method and system in the extensive operations he is now conducting.
The Rescue of the U. S. Arms in the St
Louis Arsenal.
     The late secret and sudden transference of the muskets and other war implements in the U. S. arsenal at St Louis to the safer neighborhoods of Illinois, was a well-planned and performed feat. No armed force was sent from Illinois for the purpose, all the assistance necessary being rendered by the U. S. soldiers stationed at the arsenal. Gov Yates of Illinois, it seems, had a requisition from the secretary of war for 10,000 of the muskets for the arming of the Illinois militia. But it was supposed the secession mob in St Louis, if not the state authorities of Missouri, would resist the transference, if undertaken openly, and according to form. So Capt James H. Stokes of Chicago, formerly of the regular army, undertook to procure the muskets by stratagem. He went to St Louis and made his way as rapidly as possible to the arsenal. He found it surrounded by an immense mob, and the postern gates all closed. His utmost efforts to penetrate the crowd were for a long time unavailing. The requisition was shown. Capt Lyon, on of the officers in command of the arsenal, doubted the possibility of executing it. He said the arsenal was surrounded by a thousand spies, and every movement was watched and reported to the headquarters of the secessionists, who could throw an overpowering force upon them at any moment. Capt Stokes represented that every hour’s delay was rendering the capture of the arsenal more certain; and the arms must be removed to Illinois, now or never. Major Callender, also of the arsenal, agreed with him, and told him to take them at this own time and in his own way. This was Wednesday night. Capt Stokes had a spy in the secession camp, whom he met at intervals in a certain place in the city. On Thursday he received information that Gov Jackson of Missouri had ordered two thousand armed men down from Jefferson City, whose movements could only contemplate a seizure of the arsenal, by occupying the h[e]ights around it and planting batteries thereon. The job would have been an easy one. They had already planted one battery on the St Louis levee, and another at Powder Point, a short distance below the arsenal. Capt Stokes immediately telegraphed to Alton to have the steamer City of Alton drop down to the arsenal landing about midnight. He then returned to the arsenal and commenced moving the boxes of guns, weighing some three hundred pounds each, down to the lower floor. About 700 men were employed in the work. He then took 500 Kentucky flint lock muskets, which had been sent there to be altered, and sent them to be placed on a steamer as a blind to cover his real movements . . .[unreadable two lines] of the outside crowd . . . [unreadable] when this movement was executed; and Capt Lyon took the remainder, who were lying around as spies, and locked them up in his guard-house. About 11 o’clock at night the steamer City of Alton came alongside, planks were shoved out from the windows of the arsenal to the main deck, and the boxes slid down. When the 10,000 were safely on board, Capt Stokes went to Capt Lyon and Major Callender, and urged them, by the most pressing appeals, to let him empty the arsenal. They told him to go ahead and take whatever he wanted. Accordingly he took 11,000 more muskets, 500 new rifle carbines, 500 revolvers, 110,000 musket cartridges, to say, nothing of the cannon and a large quantity of miscellaneous accoutrements, leaving only 7,000 muskets in the arsenal to arm the St Louis volunteers in behalf of the general government.
“When the whole were on board, about 2 o’clock on Friday morning, the order was given by the captain of the steamer to cast off. Judge of the consternation of all hands when it was found that she would not move. The arms had been piled in great quantities around the engines, to protect them against the battery on the levee, and the great weight had fastened the bows of

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the boat firmly on a rock which was tearing a hole through the bottom at every turn of the wheels. A man of less nerve than Capt Stokes would have gone crazy on the spot. He called the arsenal men on board, and commenced moving the boxes to the stern. Fortunately, when about 200 boxes had been shifted, the boat fell away from the shore and floated in deep water. [‘]Which way?’ said Capt Mitchell of the steamer. ‘Straight to Alton in the regular channel,’ replied Capt Stokes. ‘What if we are attacked,’ said Capt Stokes. ‘What if we are overpowered?’ said Capt M. ‘Run her to the deepest part of the river and sink her,’ replied Capt S. ‘I’ll do it,’ was the heroic answer of Capt Mitchell, and away they went past the secession battery, past the entire St Louis levee, and on to Alton in the regular channel, where they arrived at 5 o’clock in the morning. When the boat touched the landing, Capt Stokes, fearing pursuit by some two or three of the secession military companies by which the city of St Louis is disgraced, ran to the market-house and rang the fire bell. The citizens came flocking pell-mell to the river, in all sorts of habiliments. Capt Stokes informed them of the situation of things, and pointed out the freight cars. Instantly men, women and children boarded the steamer, seized the freight, and clambered up the levees to the cars. Rich and poor tugged together with might and main for two hours, when the cargo was all deposited in the cars, and the train moved off, amid their enthusiastic cheers, for Springfield.”
Union Feeling in Virginia.
     We hear good things about the Union feeling in Virginia, very good things, and trustworthy ones too. For instance, we know of a wealthy family near Norfolk, the heads of which were secessionists up to the date of the outrage on Fort Sumter, who have had to fly for their lives, because of their openly expressed determination to abide by the Union, as it is. They arrived in Philadelphia yesterday, and bring the good news that it is only necessary to occupy Norfolk with a federal army to redeem that portion of Virginia from the Jeff Davis thraldom. This information is confirmed by a most interesting family residing near Portsmouth, who were compelled to escape from threatened violence, only a few days ago, leaving all their property behind them. The head of this family assured us that he apprehended worse things from the discontent of the slaves than from the secessionists. Again, a gentleman from western Virginia, whose standing is a most commanding one among the people of that quarter, assures us that this portion of the state will never desert the Union. He predicts that, ere many days, the men of that section will be in arms under the federal flag, rallying to the late call of the president, just as they have done in Missouri, without waiting for the authority of the governor. These are only two cases in point. The events of the next fifteen days will confirm the expectations of the loyal Virginians who bring us these hopeful tidings.—New York Tribune.
Miscellaneous Items.
     Ten days ago Henry Winter Davis fled from Baltimore to save his life from the passions of the secession mob. Now he is back, and rides and walks the streets in safety daily.
     Forts Carroll and Madison, lately reinforced, are of some consequence, although little is said about them. Fort Madison lies about one mile east of Annapolis, on the other side of the Severn, and if in good order commands that town and the better part of the anchorage ground below in Annapolis Roads. It is therefore essential for the peaceable enjoyment of Annapolis as a military and naval station by the United States. Fort Carroll is the key to Baltimore harbor. It lies about four miles southeast of Fort McHenry, on the flats off Soller’s Point, at a place where the Patapsco, on which Baltimore lies, is little more than a mile wide. With Fort McHenry to keep the mob in order, and Fort Carroll to watch the harbor, Baltimore is safe. Fort Carroll was intended for one of the largest forts in the United States, and although unfinished is said to mount upwards of one hundred guns.
     It is rumored at Washington that Gen Harney has been put under arrest as a suspected traitor[.] The report is probably premature.
     The steamer Lioness, commissioned as a privateer by the secession leaders in Baltimore, was captured by a U. S. vessel in Chesapeake Bay a few days since.
     Twenty-five thousand Minie rifles have been purchased in Canada for the United States government, and more can be obtained, it is said.
     The steamer Chesapeake started from New York Friday evening, with the first Maine regiment, direct to Washington. She had also on board 600 barrels of provisions, 120 cattle, a company of the 71st New York regiment, a detachment of the New York 12th regiment, 600 stands of arms, and a number of uniforms for the volunteers in the New York 71st regiment, already in Washington.
     There has been some talk of forming a volunteer rifle company of the newspaper reporters, correspondents, &c., now collected at Washington. The idea was abandoned, however, from the knowledge that, if news of an important “item” should be received, four-fifths of the company would “break rank” and rush to capture it.
     At Lodi, Ill., a woman cut off the two forefingers of her husband while he was asleep to keep him from enlisting. This disables him by law.
     Among the Rhode Island volunteers are a number of birth-right members of the Society of Friends. the Providence Journal says: We always had that class of Quakers among us. Nathaniel Greene was one of them. The meeting deals very tenderly with the delinquents. As in case of “disorderly marriage” they are only obliged to say, when they come back, that they are “sorry, and request it may be overlooked;” and are not required to specify what they are sorry for, whether for the tough beef or for the breach of discipline. ‘Obediah,’ said a venerable elder to his grandson, ‘thee knows it is against discipline to fight.’ ‘Yes, grandfather.’ ‘Is that shooting thing in thy hands rifled?’ ‘Of course, it is; you don’t think I would have any other.’ ‘I’m told that is the best kind; now take it right out of my sight.”
     While the 7th regiment was in Philadelphia, a fine old Quaker lady observing that one of the band was in a state of great embarrassment for the lack of a string with which to secure the mouth of his bag of provisions, observed quietly—“Friend, I would not give thee an implement of war, but thee shall have a string to preserve thy food.” Then she turned partly away for an instant, and stooped down, to tie her shoe, apparently, but when she rose up she handed to the blushing blower of brass a neat green band, that a moment before had been doing duty as a—a—a—well, garter.
     Miss Lander, the sculptress, is associated with Miss Dix, the well known philanthropist, in attending to the wants of the ill and wounded soldiers at the hospital in Washington.
     Lieut Maury has been doing reasonable work for some time. The records of the observatory at Washington show that he has for several months past impressed upon the minds of scientific bodies abroad that this country was destined to disruption, and that the government would not last three weeks after the inauguration of Mr Lincoln.
     Collector Goodrich has received orders to permit vessels to clear from Boston for Baltimore, but they will not be permitted to touch at Norfolk.

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