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Seminars

Spring 12: Moving Image Studies Courses

Fall 11: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8160. Style and Narrative Analysis

The focus will be on “the work of style.” Readings will be drawn from Tinkcom’s Working Like a Homosexual; Beller’s Cinematic Mode of Production; Shaviro’s Post-Cinematic Affect; Galt’s Pretty; Del Rio’s Deleuze and the Cinemas of Performance; Brenez’s Abel Ferrara; and Herzog’s Dreams of Difference, Songs of the Same. Restivo.

Comm 6180. National Cinemas: Hong Kong, Taiwan, PRC.

For the most part, the focus will be on the three cinemas from 1980 to the present. Issues to be explored are art vs. popular cinemas; cultural specificities; film and national allegory; urban space and modernization. Films to be studied include selected wuxia films, films of the Fifth generation, auteurs such as Wong Kar-wai, Stanely Kwan, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Tsai Ming-liang, Jia Zhangke, and the “urban generation.” Restivo.

Comm 6260. Adapting Literature to Film

A variety of novels offering special problems for film adaptation. Tracing the adaptive processes through scripts and directorial decisions that point to issues beyond fidelity that demonstrate specifically cinematic methods and intentions. Boozer.

Comm 6310. Feature Screenwriting I

Preparation for working through story ideas and character bios to a dramatic premise, treatment, back stories, and arrangement of main characters into an effective dramatic story structure. Includes plot and character analysis of a chosen film from writer’s viewpoint. Completion of first half of a feature script to be completed in Feature Screenwriting II. Boozer.

Comm 6240: Documentary Film

This course will explore the history and aesthetics of the documentary form, as well as investigate the questions documentaries have provoked concerning ethics, objectivity and subjectivity, film theory, authorship, reality and its representation, and the complicated relationship between filmmakers, subjects, and viewers. At a point in time when Webcams, phone-cams, and reality t.v. are de rigeur, this course offers a look at the development of documentary conventions as well as departures from and challenges to them. The course covers cinéma vérité, observational cinema, first and third person narration, ethnographic documentary, cine-autobiography, environmental films, political and feminist documentaries, and “fake” documentaries. We’ll ask where and how the lines are drawn these days between fiction and fact and between subject and object, and what it means to mark those boundaries, blur them, or lose sight of them altogether. The course holds that “art” and “documentary” aren’t mutually exclusive, thus our emphasis will be on close analysis of the style and structure of documentary as they contribute to the rhetorical “punch” of any given work. Barker.

Comm 8980- Topics in Theory: Race & Capital

This seminar approaches race as a form of appearance of capital and blackness as a commodity form. In order to develop this argument the class is divided in 5 sections. The first section explores the issue of form in Marx’s Capital; the second section explores the notion of the Long Twentieth Century, a historiographical unit that places the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the same historical continuum as our highly speculative contemporary moment of capital accumulation; the third section addresses the notion of the Racial Contract; the fourth section deals with the racialization of the Body Politic and the final section, titled Blackness as Phantasmagoria, outlines some repercussions of the imbrication of race and capital for the history of visuality. Raengo

Comm 6160 - Media History

This seminar surveys the history of a variety of media forms during the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing particularly on the evolution of these media within the United States. Though our emphasis will be primarily on the development of motion pictures, radio, television, and advertising, we will also discuss newspapers, telephony, telegraphy, games, music, and the Internet during the course of the semester. We will read works employing a range of theories and methods, thereby considering the varied ways that media history can be presented. Perren

Documentary Production: Special Prod Topics Comm 6165

This is a production course that will interrogate different formal and ideological approaches of non-fiction filmmaking. Students will be exposed to a variety of styles, forms, and perspectives that will help situate them and their productions within the enormous diversity of non-fiction work today. The authenticity of images, the credibility of evidence, the representation of the past, and the objectivity of the filmmaker will all be considered in relation to the films students will produce within this course. A consistent challenge for documentary filmmakers is to represent people in an appropriate manner. Documentaries often address people as they live their lives. Consequences follow, for filmmaker, subjects and viewers alike. The risk of misuse, and abuse, is high. The potential to shape and alter people’s lives is real. Much is at stake. How to represent others; how to represent yourself to others, can serve as guiding questions for the course. Students will complete several individual film assignments with set parameters that will be made quickly, and one longer film project of their own design that they will work on throughout the semester. The assignments are intended to facilitate a comprehensive workshop of documentary production practice. After completing the course, students will have a substantial first-hand awareness about the process of making a variety of documentary films. Students should be prepared to devote a significant amount of time outside of class to complete assignments. Robin

Comm 8640 Television Studies

Introducing students to both the “classic” literature of TV Studies and to more recent works exploring the medium’s contemporary transformations, this seminar examines the way TV Studies theories and associated methodologies still shape cutting-edge inquiry into our ever-evolving media environment. Shahaf

Summer 11: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6160. Special Topics: Race and Visual Culture

What is a racial image? When and how has race been made to appear visually natural? What role does this fact have in maintaining its grip today? Can we think of race apart from the body that supposedly carries its marks? This class focuses on the visuality of race. It is not a course concerned with the assessment of the positive or negative connotations of racial images, nor with the straightforward analysis of racial stereotypes, but it rather focuses on the visual regimes of race representation. It follows Toni Morrison’s suggestion that ‘blackness’ and ‘whiteness’ are two languages through which America talks about itself. It understands race as a visual language of social relation, as a defining feature of the social contract, as a specific phenomenology of embodiment, as a series of affects, and as a visualization of the commodity form. The class unfolds through close readings of the visual theory implied in the work of W.E.B. DuBois, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, and Frantz Fanon, as well as that of other contemporary theorists, visual artists, and filmmakers. Raengo

Spring 11: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6020. Advanced Film Theory

Topics include cinema & modernity; classical film theory; auteurism, mise-en-scene criticism and the institutionalization of film studies; the semiotic turn; psychoanalysis and ideological criticism; feminist film theory; race, postcolonial theory, and Third cinema; queer theory; media, spectacle and postmodernity. Restivo.

Comm 6270. Styles, Periods, Movements: Postmodernism

Restivo.

Comm 6320 Feature Screenwriting II

Completion of feature length script begun in Comm 6310 in the fall. Includes reader self-evaluations, revisions, polish, and marketing and competition preparation. Opportunities for internships in screenplay competitions as a coverage reader. (A few lead to paid positions.) Boozer.

Comm 6280 Topics in Authors/Genres: The Film Noir Tradition

Tracing primary narrative positions in character types, point of view, and aesthetics of style, and tone, as well as thematic codes related to gender, sexuality, class, race, and the position of the Law from classic noir through neo-noir to post-noir. Boozer.

Comm 6280 Horror Film

The course covers a range of horror modes from classic to contemporary horror, including monster movies and slasher films, body horror, psychological horror, and art horror. The course centers especially on manifestations of the “undead,” especially man-made monsters, zombies, and ghosts. With these creatures as our focus, the course investigates ways in which the very nature of media (photography, film, video, digital media, etc.) may shape and reflect our thinking about concepts and states like death, liveness, good and evil, hybridity, contagion, and humanity and animality that underpin current cultural debates around issues such as stem cell research, H1N1, terrorism and torture, late capitalism, the post-cinematic, and others. Barker

Comm 8980/6160: Cinema and the Senses

The course invites students to think concretely and critically about the multisensory nature of the experience of moving images. Though our focus is cinema, the course turns for insight to other art forms as well, including but not limited to television, sound art, architecture, installation and performance art, painting, music, perfumery, cuisine, and “the everyday.” We’ll investigate such things as embodied metaphor (e.g., “insight”), contemporary theories of embodiment in media studies, and the cultural history and politics of the senses. Students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing the role of the senses in the experience of moving images, in part by studying the ways embodiment and sensual experience have been treated in other academic fields (philosophy, psychology, history, anthropology, art criticism, etc.) and specific historical contexts. Although the course is organized around the five senses as classically conceived, plus the occasional special guest (hello, proprioception!), its guiding principle is the way senses mingle and inform one another. To this end, the course is strongly informed by contemporary work on and around synaesthesia, which we will consider not only as poetic metaphor or psycho-physiological phenomenon, but also as critical practice. If you've ever described a moving image as enlightening, resonant, disgusting, eye-opening, hair-raising, gut-wrenching, we’ll investigate just how, why, and to what extent those terms are relevant, provocative, and meaningful. Barker

Comm 6160/Comm 8980 Film and Media Industries

This course traces the development and increasing interrelatedness of the media industries from the early twentieth century to the present. We consider the ways that regulatory and technological shifts, as well as growing impulses toward globalization, have intersected with industrial changes. We look at the range of theoretical and critical approaches that have been taken toward the media industries. The course also explores the emerging field of “media industry studies.” This field, which incorporates work in film, media, communications, and cultural studies, argues for the importance of integrating analysis of media structures with consideration of cultural and textual matters. Perren.

Comm 6160 Comm 8980: Special topics – Globalization Media and Culture

Shahaf.

Fall 10: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6260 Adapting Literature to Film

A variety of novels offering special problems for film adaptation. Tracing the adaptive processes through scripts and directorial decisions that point to issues beyond fidelity that demonstrate specifically cinematic methods and intentions. Boozer.

Comm 6310 Feature Screenwriting I

Preparation for working through story ideas and character bios to a dramatic premise, treatment, back stories, and arrangement of main characters into an effective dramatic story structure. Includes plot and character analysis of a chosen film from writer’s viewpoint. Completion of first half of a feature script to be completed in Feature Screenwriting II. Boozer.

Summer 10: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6180: National Cinemas: Global Art Cinema

A study of the shifting aesthetic and thematic concerns, from the 90s to the present, of various global auteurs, including Kusturica, Haneke, Fatih Akin, Assayas, Wong Kar-wai, Jia Zhangke, and others.

Spring 10: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6020. Advanced Film Theory.

Topics include cinema & modernity; classical film theory; auteurism, mise-en-scene criticism and the institutionalization of film studies; the semiotic turn; psychoanalysis and ideological criticism; feminist film theory; race, postcolonial theory, and Third cinema; queer theory; media, spectacle and postmodernity. Restivo.

Comm 6320 Feature Screenwriting II.

Completion of feature length script begun in Comm 6310 in the fall. Includes reader self-evaluations, revisions, polish, and marketing and competition preparation. Opportunities for internships in screenplay competitions as a coverage reader. (A few lead to paid positions.) Boozer

Comm 6280. Topics in Authors/Genres: Hitchcock and Psychoanalysis

Each week a key psychoanalytic concept will be paired with a film by Hitchcock, in order to allow the theory and the artwork to interact and illuminate one another. Restivo.

Comm 6160/Comm 8980 Film and Media Industries

This course traces the development and increasing interrelatedness of the media industries from the early twentieth century to the present. We consider the ways that regulatory and technological shifts, as well as growing impulses toward globalization, have intersected with industrial changes. We look at the range of theoretical and critical approaches that have been taken toward the media industries. The course also explores the emerging field of “media industry studies.” This field, which incorporates work in film, media, communications, and cultural studies, argues for the importance of integrating analysis of media structures with consideration of cultural and textual matters. Perren.

Comm 6160 Comm 8980: Special topics – Globalization Media and Culture

This course critically examines the ideological, political, cultural, economic and industrial discourses of globalization as they relate to the study of television and other media. We review the historical contexts and main theoretical debates shaping contemporary conversations about globalization, media, and culture (cultural studies, post-colonial theories, political economy, cultural imperialism, cultural globalization, and more), and address issues of television and other media industries, texts, and audiences’ globalization as well as issues of identity formation (nationalism/ race/ ethnicity/ gender/ class and more), in multiple cultural contexts. Shahaf.

Fall 09: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8160: Style and Narrative Analysis.

The course this semester considers the style and narrative not only of filmic texts, but also of the film experience itself, which may diverge productively from that of any given film. We will pursue this idea through the notion of cinephilia. This may be most simply defined as “love of the movies,” but much more broadly, cinephilia is a mode of perception that diverges from conventional style and narrative by looking elsewhere and otherwise: toward the edges of the screen, perhaps, or at seemingly irrelevant details. It encompasses a range of tendencies and strategies, including obsession, boredom, fixation, distraction, interrogation, consumption, rescue and re-use, and fetishistic curiosity. It manifests itself as a mode of spectatorship, analysis, history, criticism, theory, and even production. As a mode of perception and study, cinephilia relishes alternative (that is, productively unfocused, unhinged, unruly) approaches not only to the filmic image and narrative, but also to images at large, to history, to identity, to ideology. The course invites students to explore and experiment with cinephilia from some of these angles, while we study its historical sources of inspiration and ask what possibilities it presents for the future study of moving images. Barker.

Summer 09: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 6910/6180. Film study at the Cineteca di Bologna.

Bologna, Italy. Restivo

Spring 09: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8980. Special Topics. Cinema and the Senses

With a focus on the embodied experience of cinema, this course investigates the uniquely intimate and reversible relationship between film and viewer and between the senses themselves. Readings include classical and contemporary film theory but also draw heavily from philosophy, cultural studies, and studies of architecture, painting, music, perfumery, and cuisine. Barker. Spring 09.

Comm 8980. Special Topics. Deleuze

The main focus of the seminar will be an intensive study of Deleuze's two cinema books, The Movement-Image and The Time-Image. This will be supplemented by readings from various sections of A Thousand Plateaus, those which relate to the subject of any given week. Students will also be encouraged to read one of the shorter works (Francis Bacon: Logic of Sensation; Kafka, Toward a Minor Literature; or Proust and Signs). The principal questions to be explored are: *How does Deleuze understand the cinema? *What does it mean to do a "Deleuzian" analysis [or a "schizoanalysis"] of the moving image? *What kind of "politics of the image" can we extrapolate from Deleuze's work, and how does it differ from film theory's earlier model of ideological effects of the apparatus? *What is the significance of Deleuze's rejection of the "linguistic turn" in philosophy? What kind of semiotics would take the place of a semiotics based on the linguistic? Restivo. Spring 09.

Comm 8680. Media Reception Practices.

This is an upper-level course for graduate students in Moving Images Studies, Public Communication, history, English, etc. which broadly examines qualitative methodological approaches to the study of reception and media audiences. Our readings will include works using historical methodology, TV audience studies, fan cultures (both of these drawing from the Birmingham cultural studies approach), ethnography, feminist film studies, film reception studies, and issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class. We will discuss a wide variety of media; however, we shall start with television and film, we shall see who is interested in other aspects of book/print, comics, radio, internet and other audience cultures. We will examine leading works in the field, studying their methodologies, then individually design and research audience case studies. The seminar will be focused on student group discussion and presentation of texts, research methods, and findings. Students will complete 4-5 short (2 page) analytical papers on various books, a 6-7 page midterm essay, and will be working all term on a research project that will become a 15-20 page paper by the end of the semester. Fuller-Seeley. Spring 09

Comm 8980. Special Topics. Television Studies.

Course considers range of issues regarding television’s past and present role as a cultural, social, political and industrial force. We trace the development of television studies from a humanistic perspective, exploring the diverse industrial/institutional, sociocultural, textual and reception-oriented approaches that have been taken in the study of the medium. Survey “canonical” texts from the last three decades and consider the ways these texts have continued to shape ideas in this still young and emerging field of study. Also examine recent work in television studies as a means of assessing both the changing nature of television and of television studies as an area of inquiry. Perren.

Comm 6960. American Film History II. Friedman.

Comm 6910. Special Project. Crossing Borders in German Films. Stewart.

Comm 6280. Topics in Authors/Genres: Film Noir. Boozer.

Comm 6160. Special Topics. Film and Literature. Roberts.

Comm 6020. Advanced Film Theory. MA Core Course.

This course surveys the classical and contemporary media theories that have informed film and television scholarship to the present. Readings blend landmark theoretical writings with examples of criticism that demonstrate how to apply those theories to individual texts. This course provides an overview of the ways that media studies scholars examine film and television texts, and the assignments give the student the opportunity to learn how to apply these theories to give insight into particular texts. Smith.

Comm 6010. Issues and Perspectives in Communication. MA Core Requirement. Friedman.

Spring 09: Production and Screenwriting Courses

Comm 6840. Computer Graphic Imaging. Zhu.

Comm 6360. Digital Post-Production. Second-year Production Core. Strickler.

Comm 6320. Feature Screenwriting II. Boozer.

Comm 6160: Special Topics. Creative Work in Creative Industries. Beck.

Comm 6135. Digital Cinematography. First-year Production Core. Bolia.

Fall 08: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8980. Special Topics. Race and Visual Culture.

A multidisciplinary class on the visuality of race. It traces a genealogy of how the historical construction of race as a visual property of the body has created the appearance of its self-evidence as well as its socially material existence. The class understands race as a visual language of social relations and is equally focused on the visual construction of both blackness and whiteness, and the scopic regimes within which they are represented and understood. Drawing on Critical Race Theory, Post-colonial Theory, Marxist Theory, and Visual Culture Studies, the class combines a genealogical/historical approach with a theoretical/analytical one. It is divided in four units: the first – Race as Epistemology - outlines the epistemology that created race as visual fact exploring its connection with the financial revolution brought about by the slave trade, the relationship between race and property in legal discourse, race and value in political economy, and the relationship between race and Enlightenment Reason in the formation of the racial contract. The second – Race as Scopic Regime – examines the racialization of the visual and visual concepts such as color blindness and the color line. The third – The Semiotics of Race – utilizes the tools of semiotic analysis to understand the ontology of racial signifiers. The fourth – Blackness – assesses the use of this concept in relation to the body and aesthetic and rhetorical forms such as the mask and the shadow. The final unit – Blackness as Metapicture – tests the outlined frameworks against the intensely mediated contemporary visual landscape and within the context of what in the visual arts has been defined as ‘post-blackness.’ Raengo. Fall 08.

Comm 8980. Special Topics. New Directions in Cultural Studies. Friedman.

Comm 6910. Media History.

This course is a seminar for graduate students in methods, content and theories of media history. It is a broad survey of US and world media history from 1870 to the present, involving film, radio, television, advertising, journalism and new media, integrating the study of aesthetics, technologies, cultural history, media institutions and forms. Our goal will be preparing to teach a variety of undergrad courses including Film 2700 Film History, the TV/broadcasting history course, and the new lower level course broadly surveying media history 1920-present. We will look at ways that the history of media content and form, its producers and audiences are being studied and interpreted. There will be small weekly analytical assignments, a midterm essay, and a number of course lectures, syllabi and lecture outlines that will be combined into a portfolio for submission at the end of the semester. Fuller-Seeley. Fall 08

Comm 6280. Film Genres: Science Fiction and Fantasy. Friedman.

Comm 6170. American Film History I. Friedman.

Comm 6160. Special Topics. Literature to Film Adaptation. Boozer.

Comm 6030. Research Methods in Communication. MA core requirement. Atkinson.

Comm 6010. Issues and Perspectives in Communication. MA core requirement. Bruner.

Fall 08: Production and Screenwriting Courses

Comm 6355. Digital Moving Image Production. Second-year production core course. Schiffer.

Comm 6310. Feature Screenwriting I. Boozer.

Comm 6250. Producing for TV and Film. Beck.

Comm 6155. Media Expression. First-year production core course. Vollmer.

Comm 6145. Digital Editing. First-year production core course. Bolia.

Comm 6000. Acting for the Camera. Schiffer.

Summer 08: All Courses

Comm 6310. Feature Screenwriting I. Boozer.

Comm 6160. Special Topics: High Definition Cinematography. Bolia.

Comm 6160. Special Topics: Close Textual Analysis: Taxi Driver. Restivo.

Comm 6115. Screenwriting for the Short Film. Schiffer.

Spring 08: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8980. Special Topics: Film and Media Industries.

Course traces the development – and increasing interrelatedness – of the media industries from the early twentieth century to the present. We consider the ways that regulatory and technological shifts, as well as growing impulses toward globalization, have intersected with industrial changes. Look at the range of theoretical and critical approaches that have been taken toward the media industries. Also explore the emerging field of “media industry studies.” This field, which incorporates work in film, media, communications and cultural studies, argues for the importance of integrating analysis of media structures with consideration of cultural and textual matters. Perren.

Comm 8770. Comparative Studies in Emerging Media. Friedman.

Comm 8420. Media Historiography.

This course is a seminar for graduate students in the theories and methods of film, TV and media history. We will be looking at theoretical aspects of "what's history, what's media history, and how do you do media history?" We'll start with some historiographic overviews, and then look at some of the many ways film and TV histories are being studied and interpreted. There will be small weekly analytical assignments (one page – listing questions and arguments the book makes); a midterm essay assignment, and a 15 page primary source research paper involving either your topic (approved by me) or using a primary source set something like the Thanhouser documents (a CD-Rom history of the Thanhouser Company, a “transitional era” New York-based film studio that comes with a spectacular array of rare films and primary source documents). We will each develop topics that tie in what we are learning with what aspects of media study you might be interested in, and work on historical papers, which we will present at the end of the term. Fuller-Seeley. Spring 08

Comm 6960. American Film History II. Friedman.

Comm 6280. Film Genres: Film Noir. Boozer.

Comm 6030. Research Methods in Communication. MA core requirement. Bennett.

Comm 6020. Advanced Film Theory. MA Core Course.

Topics include cinema & modernity; classical film theory; auteurism, mise-en-scene criticism and the institutionalization of film studies; the semiotic turn; psychoanalysis and ideological criticism; feminist film theory; race, postcolonial theory, and Third cinema; queer theory; media, spectacle and postmodernity. Restivo.

Comm 6010. Issues and Perspectives in Communication. MA Core Requirement. Bruner.

Spring 08: Production and Screenwriting Courses

Comm 6840. Computer Graphic Imaging. Zhu.

Comm 6360. Digital Post-Production. S econd-year Production Core. Strickler.

Comm 6320. Feature Screenwriting II. Boozer.

Comm 6910. Special Project: Production for TV and Film. Beck.

Comm 6135. Digital Cinematography. First-year Production Core. Bolia.

Fall 07: Moving Image Studies Courses

Comm 8980. Special Topics: Critical Visual Cultural Theory.

An introduction to the field of Visual Culture Studies via Critical Theory. It reviews and examines some of the major strands in Critical Theory that have contributed to institute visual culture as an interdisciplinary object of study. Alongside a survey of the field, the seminar looks at the epistemology of vision already present in selected aspects of Critical Theory in order to foreground how the question of vision and visuality is already part and parcel of the Critical Theory project. The seminar is roughly divided into two parts: part one focuses more prominently on the connection between Cultural Theory and modernity and the explorations of its visual regimes, while the second part addresses more directly theories emerging from the reflection on post-modernity, including Post-Colonial and Critical Race Theory. The approach is interdisciplinary, intermediatic, and multidiscursive. Broad theoretical questions are specified through case studies which involve the field of photography, cinema, advertising, digital art, and the performing arts. Raengo.

Comm 8980. Special Topics: Comics: Words, Pictures, Stories, Histories.

Although comics themselves are culturally and aesthetically complex texts, comics scholarship is in its early stages, still burdened by the medium’s cultural position as a simple children’s form. This course takes this popular medium seriously. The course focuses on providing students with the historical context and aesthetic tools to do original research on comics in his/her chosen field. Smith.

Comm 8160. Style and Narrative Analysis.

The course will focus on Hitchcock and film noir (though we’ll start with a session on Expressionism/Surrealism, and we’ll end with one of Godard’s “Paris films” and with Taxi Driver). The overarching goal will be to explore how the styles and narratives of Hitchcock and of film noir express–in vernacular or “common” language–the project of modernity. The course will be organized by three broad rubrics: “objects,” “spaces,” and “lifeworlds.” Restivo.

Comm 6170. American Film History I. Edwards.

Comm 6160. Special Topics: Literature to Film Adaptation. Boozer.

Comm 6160. Special Topics: The Politics of Classical Hollywood. Friedman.

Comm 6030. Research Methods in Communication. MA core requirement. Wilkin.

Comm 6010. Issues and Perspectives in Communication. MA core requirement. Bennett.

Fall 07: Production and Screenwriting Courses

Comm 6355. Digital Moving Image Production. Second-year production core course. Schiffer.

Comm 6310. Feature Screenwriting I. Boozer.

Comm 6155. Media Expression. First-year production core course. Vollmer.

Comm 6145. Digital Editing. First-year production core course. Bolia.

Comm 6000. Acting for the Camera. Schiffer.

Summer 07:

Comm 8780. T.W. Adorno and the Critique of Mass Culture. Cheshier.

Comm 6910/6180. Film Study at the Cineteca di Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Restivo