The Complete Text of Section 400
Academic Instructional Information


Section 401 - Class Organization

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

401 Class Organization

401.01 Course Syllabus

All teaching faculty shall provide at or before the first meeting of a class, each term, a copy of a course syllabus to each student in their classes. The syllabus may be distributed either in print or electronically. Also, a copy of each syllabus shall be provided the departmental office no later than the end of the first week of class.

"Course syllabi shall contain the following items of information:

1. complete course title and number; name of professor; term, year;

2. statement of faculty member's accessibility to students outside of class (e.g., office hours, telephone number);

3. prerequisites (if any) for the course;

4. course objectives that specify measurable and/or observable student learning outcomes. These learning outcomes should state course objectives in language that makes explicit the knowledge and skills students should have after completing the course. Consequently, these objectives may be quantitative or qualitative, as appropriate for the learning outcomes. The learning outcomes for general education courses are available at www.gsu.edu/~wwwfhb/goals.doc as approved by the GSU Senate 2/13/04.

5. course assignments (e.g., required readings and activities) and due dates;

6. specific course requirements (e.g., written and oral tests and reports, research papers; performances). In cross-listed undergraduate and graduate classes, the course requirements will clearly specify how the nature (quality and/or quantity) of the work expected of students and the criteria for evaluation of the work produced be commensurate with the degree level. Any projects and/or other activities required specifically of graduate students taking the course and the criteria by which student work will be judged must differentiate graduate-level from undergraduate-level work;

7. grading policy: how the final grade is to be determined with respect to the weights assigned to various course requirements;

8. attendance policy (see current University general Catalog for University guidelines). Syllabi should state specific requirements for attendance including requirements for the frequency and kind of participation by designated channels;

9. list of text(s) or other required course materials;

10. make-up examination policy;

11. all syllabi should include the following statement: 'The course syllabus provides a general plan for the course; deviations may be necessary.'

12. all syllabi should refer to the Policy on Academic Honesty (Section 409).

13. all syllabi should include the following statement: "Your constructive assessment of this course plays an indispensable role in shaping education at Georgia State. Upon completing the course, please take time to fill out the online course evaluation."

14. all syllabi should include the following statement: "Students who wish to request accommodation for a disability may do so by registering with the Office of Disability Services. Students may only be accommodated upon issuance by the Office of Disability Services of a signed Accommodation Plan and are responsible for providing a copy of that plan to instructors of all classes in which accommodations are sought.

(Numbers 1 - 12 passed by the Senate Committee on Faculty Affairs, 1996;
Number 13 passed by the University Senate on 12-11-08 Number 14 passed by the University Senate on 3/12/09)

401.02 Class Rolls

During the first week of classes each term, faculty members receive initial class rolls from the Office of the Registrar. Late registrants may be added to these rolls only if they present "Fees Paid Slips." Following the late registration period, faculty members are furnished with "Change Day," post-registration class rolls. Approximately two weeks prior to the mid-point of the term, faculty receive "Verification Rolls;" they are asked to check the accuracy of these rolls. Students not on these rolls should be sent to the Office of the Registrar. Official rolls are produced after the midpoint of the term. If errors are detected in the official rolls, these should be brought to the attention of the Office of the Registrar. Final grade rolls are produced the last day of class. Faculty are to record grades and return rolls to the departmental chairman in time for them to be submitted to the Office of Registrar not later than 24 hours after the final examination or by noon of the day following the last day of the scheduled examination period, whichever occurs first.

Faculty members are not authorized to transfer students to other classes or otherwise to adjust schedules. However, they may make recommendations for such adjustments through the departmental chairman to the Office of Academic Assistance of the colleges.

401.03 Student Attendance

The resources of the university are provided for the intellectual growth and development of its students; it is expected that students attend class regularly. "Attendance" means following the specific requirements for attendance including requirements for the frequency and kind of participation by designated channels. There are two formal institutional regulations regarding class attendance: Veterans' attendance policy, delineated below; and Regents' Test Preparation course attendance policy (see current Catalog).

All matters related to student absences, including the making up of work missed, are to be arranged between the student and the professor. All professors will, at the beginning of each term, make a clear statement to all their classes in the syllabus their policies for handling absences. Professors will also be responsible for counseling with their students regarding the academic consequences of absences from their classes or laboratories. Students are obligated to adhere to the requirements of each course and of each course professor.

If a faculty member wishes to withdraw a student from the course for exceeding the established absence policy, the faculty member should originate a "Withdrawal Form" (available from the Office of Academic Assistance and from the Registrar), and indicate in the space provided that the student violated the absence policy for the course. The completed form should be forwarded to the departmental chairman's office. Students must be present for announced quizzes, laboratory periods, or final examinations unless the reasons for the absences are acceptable to the professors concerned. Faculty are strongly encouraged to take into consideration whether a short-term absence results from participation in university business, from attendance at recognized religious holidays of the student's faith, from summons to jury duty, or from similar compelling reasons for absence. Faculty should make students aware of the academic consequences of their absences.

401.04 Veteran Attendance

Georgia State University has contractual responsibilities for monies paid as Veterans' Benefits.

The Department of Veterans Affairs requires that institutions of higher learning immediately report to them when a student discontinues attendance. Georgia State University institutional policy requires that professors report the absence of a veteran student as soon as it is known that the student will not be returning to class. Generally, this should be reported after one week of absences and no later thatn two weeks of nonattendance by a student.

Students receiving veterans' benefits must comply with attendance regulations of the University and the Veterans Administration. No such veteran may drop any course or stop attending any class without prior approval of the Registrar's Office and executing formal withdrawal procedures with that office and the Office of the Veterans Coordinator. There are no exceptions to this rule. Georgia State University is required to report to the Veterans Administration on absence and progress toward educational objectives and other matters affecting benefits.

At the beginning of each term, "Veterans Attendance Rolls" are provided to each faculty member for convenience in record keeping. It is the responsibility of each professor to report to the Veterans Service Office any veteran who has accumulated 10 class hours of consecutive absences. Forms for reporting non-attendance are available in the Office of Academic Assistance of each college.

401.05 Withdrawal from Class

401.06 Textbooks and Other Course Materials

Textbook and course material selection is the prerogative of the instructor except when departments or colleges have selected textbooks for multiple-section or required courses. Faculty will strive to select textbooks and other course materials that comply with requirements for accessibility of the Americans with Disabilities Act, other applicable acts, and their implementing regulations.

401.07 Access To Student Records

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, student have the right to access their educational records. 20 U.S.C.1232 g,a,3 states: "Education records" means those records which (1) are directly related to a student, and (2) are maintained by an educational agency or institution or by a party acting for the agency or institution. The term does not include: (1) records of instructional, supervisory, and administrative personnel and educational personnel ancillary thereto which are in the sole possession of the maker thereof, and are not accessible or revealed to any other individual except a substitute. For the purpose of this definition a "substitute" means an individual who performs on a temporary basis the duties of the individual who made the record, and does not refer to an individual who permanently succeeds the maker of the record in his or her position. Appendix W includes Georgia State University's policy on student records.

401.08 Disruptive Student Behavior Policy

[Approved by the University Senate: 4/24/03 and amended 4/20/06]

401.09 Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

Assessment should be conducted to determine the extent of student achievement of the stated learning outcomes and to inform the subsequent improvement of learning experiences.

[Approved by the University Senate: 12/5/02]


Section 402 - Examinations

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

402 Examinations

402.01 Final Examinations

A final examination is defined as an examination to be given during the scheduled time and day after the end of classes for the term. The standard in-class final examination length is two hours. It is expected that a final examination will be given in each course as part of the requirements for the course as stated in the syllabus, unless one of the following conditions apply:

A. departmental/college policy governs final examinations for the course;

B. the academic nature of the course does not warrant a final examination in the opinion of the instructor;

C. an alternative form of examination to be completed after the end of classes for the term is being given (for example, a "take home" final examination to be completed by students off campus after the end of classes for the term).

The schedule of times and days during which such final examinations are to be given is in the online Registration Guide. Those examinations which are designated on the course syllabus as in-class final examinations must be given at the designated time during the final examination schedule unless a change is authorized prior to the examination time by the dean (or designee) of the college in which the instructor is teaching. After the Dean's Office approves the request, a dean's office representative will communicate with the Office of the Registrar for a classroom assignment.

The instructor is responsible for taking reasonable steps to ensure the integrity of the examination environment. Different approaches may be required to ensure the integrity of student assessment in different venues, as appropriate for the learning objectives.

A student shall not be required to take more than two examinations within one twenty-four hour period during the published final examination period. More than two examinations within twenty-four hours are hereafter referred to as "clustered examinations."

A student is considered to have an inappropriate clustering of final examinations when more than two examinations fall within twenty-four hours (e.g., examinations at 8:30 am, 11:30 am, and 6:00 pm on the same day, or examinations at 6:00 pm on one day, and at 8:30 am and 2:30 pm on the following day); the student is not considered to have an inappropriate clustering of examinations if the third examination in sequence begins at the same time on the subsequent day as the first examination (e.g., 6:00 pm on one day, and 2:30 pm and 6:00 pm on the following day.)

Students who have three or more clustered examinations may request of one professor that the examination be re-scheduled according to the following procedure:

If a final examination was re-scheduled and thereby created a "cluster," the instructor of the re-scheduled examination will provide a special administration for the adversely affected student.

If one or more of the clustered examinations is a "common examination" with an established conflict resolution time, the student will request to resolve the conflict by taking one of the common examinations in the conflict resolution time. If two or three of the examinations are "common examinations" the student may request which "common examination" is to be re-scheduled.

If one of the clustered examinations is not a common examination or the result of re-scheduling, the student will request to re-schedule the examination/s scheduled as the middle examination/s. Except in extraordinary circumstances, the instructor is expected to cooperate.

If the student is unable to arrange for one of the examinations to be re-scheduled, the student is to request assistance from the Office of the Dean of his/her college. The student's dean (or designee) in consultation with the dean/s (or designee/s) of the courses involved will designate the examination to be re-scheduled.

Once a student has taken an examination, he or she cannot request a re-examination on the basis of this policy.

402.02 Regents' Examination

All undergraduate students at Georgia State University must take and pass an examination of reading and writing skills perscribed by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Each institution of the University System of Georgia shall assure the other institutions, and the system as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess certain minimum skills of reading and writing. A complete policy statement regarding the Regents' Examination can be found in the current general Catalog. Students may obtain additional information concerning the Regents' Examination from the Student Advisement Center Office.

402.03 Legislative Requirements

A 1953 act of the Georgia Legislature established the requirements that any person receiving a degree from a state-supported institution of higher learning successfully complete coursework or pass examinations in the histories of the United States and Georgia and the constitutions of the United States and Georgia (BOR Policy, Section 303.04).

Students may obtain additional information concerning the legislative requirement from the Office of Academic Assistance of their academic college, the Learning Assistance Unit of the Counseling Center, or through the Office of the Registrar.


Section 403 - Grading Policy

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

403 Grading Policy

403.01 Grading System

The grading system at Georgia State University is governed by the Uniform Grading Policy of the University System (BOR Policy, Section 304). Letter grades "A," "B," "C," "D," and "F" are given with the exception that the "D" grade is not given in the Division of Graduate Studies of the College of Arts and Sciences. In addition, grades of "I," "IP," "W," "WF," "S," "U," "AU," "K," are used for specific purposes. The meaning of each grade is defined in the current general Catalog.

Grades are interpreted on a four-point system, with a value of four points for a grade of "A" and one point for a grade of "D."

403.02 Reporting of Grades

All final grades must be reported on the forms supplied by the Office of the Registrar no later than noon of the next business day following the last officially scheduled day of final examinations. Failure to comply with reporting deadlines results in incomplete grade reports to students (necessitating a second report) and delays to colleges in determining suspension/probation and dean's list. Even an hour delay beyond the deadline can mean that a grade roll may not be processed with the regular computer report. Faculty members are urged, however, to turn in the grades for each class as soon as possible after each final examination is given. Grades are turned in according to college practice.

The University considers student grades to be private information and prohibits the posting of grades by name or social security number on bulletin boards or classroom or office doors. A faculty member may permit a student to provide a self-addressed stamped postcard or envelope for early receipt of a grade. This policy is derived from the institution's interpretation of the Family Rights and Privacy Act (see Appendices V and W).

403.03 Policy on Grades of "I" ("Incomplete")

The notation of "I" may be given to a student who, for nonacademic reasons beyond his or her control, is unable to meet the full requirements of a course. In order to qualify for an "I", a student must:

When a student has a nonacademic reason for not completing one or more of the assignments for a course, including examinations, and wishes to receive an incomplete for the course, it is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor in person or in writing of the reason.

The grade of "I" is awarded at the discretion of the instructor and is not the prerogative of the student. Conditions to be met for removing an "I" are established by the instructor. Registering in a subsequent semester for a couse in which a grade of incomplete has been received will not remove the grade of incomplete. No student may graduate with an "I" on his or her record.

Deadline for Removal of "I": A student receiving a grade of "I" is expected to consult with the instructor within the prescribed time limit and to complete all necessary work. The period of time given to a student to remove a grade of "I" is established by the instructor, subject only to the maximum time limit set by the university. The university requires that a grade of "I" be removed not later than the end of the second academic term after the grade of "I" was assigned (whether or not the student was enrolled during these two terms).

The Office of the Registrar will assign a grade of "F" at the end of the second academic term unless the Office of the Registrar receives an approved grade adjustment request from the instructor. (If the student enrolled for S/U grading, a "U" will be assigned.). Using the grade adjustment form, instructors may or may not change the F/U to an authorized academic grade (i.e.,A,B,C,D,S or WF) but may not change it back to an "I". Instructors may not change an "I" to a "W" unless a Hardship Withdrawal is awarded. In exceptional cases, departments may authorize students to have an "I" grade for more than two semesters. Such authorizations must be approved by the department chair. The authorization to extend the "I" beyond two semesters must be renewed each semester.

Students need not be enrolled to complete assignments for a course in which a grade of "I" has been assigned. Auditing or retaking the same course will not remove an "I". No student may graduate with an incomplete grade.

Guidelines for Implementation of Policy

A. Student Responsibility to Notify Faculty: If the student does not contact the instructor regarding incomplete work, the student defaults on the assignment or examination. In that case, the instructor should grade the student accordingly, even if this results in a grade of "F" for the course. If it is later determined that the student qualified for an "I", the grade of "F" can be changed to an "I" in accordance with college and University policy. The instructor should consult his or her dean's office or department chair for applicable procedures if this case arises.

B. "Limited Assignment" Criterion: If for nonacademic reasons a student has not completed one of the following, the grade of "I" may be appropriate: final examination, term paper, performance requirement, laboratory assignment. If a significant proportion of the course is incomplete, the grade of "I" is inappropriate.

C. "Two-Week" Criterion: An "I" generally should be given only when the student fails to complete work at the very end of the term. Hence, if due dates for the assignment not completed were earlier than the last two weeks of class, or if the circumstances that caused the student not to complete the work occurred before the last two weeks of class, the student generally should not be given an "I".

D. Alternative Assignments: In working with students, faculty may choose to give students alternative, but equivalent, assignments in order to complete course requirements when completion of the original assignment is impossible or impractical.

E. Contrast of "I" to Alternative Grades: In order to determine if a grade of "I" is appropriate, it is helpful to contrast this grade with those of "W"/"WF" for hardship withdrawal and "F".

1. Comparison Of "I" To Hardship Status: The grades assigned to students granted a nonacademic hardship status leading to withdrawal after mid-term ("W"--if passing and "WF"--if not passing) are intended for students who discontinue attendance and must repeat the course in order to receive credit for it. Note that a student who does not qualify for an incomplete does not automatically qualify for hardship status; eligibility for hardship status is determined by the Office of the Dean of Students and is determined according to the individual situation. Formal application for hardship withdrawal for eligible students must be processed through the Dean of Students' Office; eligibility guidelines for hardship status may be obtained from the Dean of Students' Office. The "I", on the other hand, is for students who for nonacademic reasons do not complete some course requirement(s) during the term but who will be able to complete the requirement(s) in a timely manner without needing to attend additional classes.

It is the instructor's responsibility to determine if the student qualifies for consideration for a grade of "I". If a faculty member believes that a student who is doing passing work has a nonacademic reason for the incomplete work but judges that the proportion of incomplete work is too great to warrant a grade of "I", the faculty member may suggest that the student contact the Office of the Dean of Students to determine if hardship withdrawal status is appropriate.

2. Comparison of "I" to "F": If the reason a student does not complete one or more assignments for a course is judged by the instructor to be academic in nature or within the control of the student, then the assignments not completed should be given a grade of "F" and this "F" will be factored into the determination of the grade for the course. With heavily weighted assignments such as the final examination and the term paper, this may result in a grade of "F" for the course.

Finally, if a student is failing a course on the basis of the completed work, the student should be given an "F" for the course instead of an "I".

(Source: University Senate Resolution, October 21, 2004)

403.04 Change of Grade

A course grade will be changed by the Registrar upon receipt of a properly executed "Change of Grade" form signed by the instructor of the course, the departmental chairman, and the dean of the college by which the course is staffed. In the case of a successful student appeal under the established grade appeals procedure of the college involved, a course grade will be changed by the Registrar upon receipt of a "Course Adjustment Form" signed by the dean of the college by which the course is staffed.


Section 404 - Academic Standing

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

404 Academic Standing

Policies relating to calculation of the grade point average and academic standing, including academic discipline, are included in the general Catalog. The policy on degree program requirements, including statutes of limitations, are also included in the general Catalog.


Section 405 - Academic Recognition on University Diplomas

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

405 Academic Recognition on University Diplomas

Diplomas are issued by the University and carry an indication of the College which prescribed the course of study and the degree earned. Faculties of the respective colleges approve the graduates of their college.

The only academic recognition which will be printed on the Georgia State University diploma will be recognitions for grade point average achievement: Summa Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and Cum Laude.

Successful completion of a Department or College Honors program may be indicated on the diploma through the use of an adhesive diploma seal. The diploma seals will be supplied to eligible students during the semester following graduation by the Office of the Registrar pending the receipt of official verification of eligibility.

Seals must fit into a one and three-quarter inch square and may be of any color.

Sponsoring organizations or offices must obtain approval from the University Senate Committee on Admissions and Standards before awarding diploma seals or announcing that such seals will be awarded.

The seals should be designed so as to comport with the dignity of the Georgia State University diploma. Seal designs must be approved by a committee composed of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Vice President for Student Services, the Dean of the College involved, the Chairperson of the University Senate Committee on Admissions and Standards, and the student representative on the University Senate Committee on Admissions and Standards.

(Source: University Senate, May 5, 1988, Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Office of the Vice President for Student Services)


Section 406 - Policy on Courses Listed in University Catalogs

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

406 Policy on Courses Listed in University Catalogs

Course listings in the University catalogs shall clearly and concisely describe course content, state any prerequisites, list the number of laboratory hours (if any), and indicate the number of hours credit. Course descriptions should be brief but should include the basic information necessary for students to make informed selections of courses. Courses shall be listed in the catalogs only if the department/college/division expects to offer them within the next three years. Courses not taught in the previous three years shall be reviewed automatically by means of normal college procedures, and such courses shall be dropped from the catalogs unless adequate justifications for retaining them are received from the department/college/division. Courses previously dropped from the catalogs may be reinstated only if adequate justifications for doing so are provided to the College curriculum committee.

Rationale:

A. Course listings constitute the basis for the selection of courses by many students, and although these listings must be brief, they should provide students with basic information about the courses.

B. Courses should be included in the catalogs only if it is reasonable for a student to expect that courses listed will be taught sometime within the following three years.

C. Without a systematic and periodic review of the course listings, courses which have not been taught for a reasonable period of time may remain in the University catalogs indefinitely. Continuing to list such courses is misleading to students.

D. Colleges can develop procedures for reviewing course listings for courses which have not been taught and for considering the reinstatement of those which have previously been dropped from the catalogs.

E. Courses which have been dropped from the catalog may subsequently be taught if provisions for doing so are included in college procedures.

(Source: University Senate, May 4, 1989)


Section 407 - Cross Registration

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

407 Cross Registration

Georgia State University students may enroll in courses offered by member institutions of the Atlanta Regional Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE) under a cross registration agreement provided they meet the academic eligibility and other requirements of the agreement. consortium member institutions. ARCHE member institutions are: Agnes Scott College, Atlanta College of Art, Atlanta University Center, Clark Atlanta University, Clayton College and State University, Columbia Theological Seminary, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Interdenominational Theological Center, Kennesaw State University, Mercer University Atlanta Campus, Morehouse College, Morehouse College of Medicine, Morris Brown College, Oglethorpe University, Southern Polytechnic State University, Spelman College, and the University of Georgia.

The purpose of cross registration is to provide opportunities for enriched educational programs by permitting students at any ARCHE institution to take courses at any other member institution.

Students who wish to cross register must complete and submit an ARCHE Cross Registration form to the Registrar's Office at Georgia State University. An approval signature of a representative of the Student Advisement Center of the Office of Academic Assistance in the student's college of study is required.

Cross registration may be pursued for courses not offered at the home institution for the given term.

A student may cross register only for courses for which he/she is eligible and has met the prerequisites as defined by the home and host institutions.

Any course required for the major must be approved by the department of the home institution prior to cross registration.

First priority in registration will be given to students of the host institution; cross registration students will be accepted on availability of space and after the home students have been considered.

The academic regulations and rules of conduct of the host institution will apply to cross registrants. The host institution will determine whether its rules have or have not been violated. The home institution also will impose such penalties as it deems proper when violations occur.

Courses taken in cross registration will appear for credit on the transcript of the home institution. The credit will be recorded according to the policies of the home institution. Courses taken through cross registration count as residence credit and grades are included in the Georgia State University grade point average.

For all courses taken, the tuition and fees will be at the rate of the home institution and paid to the home institution.

Cross registration is available in the summer on a limited basis.

Cross registration students are eligible to use such facilities on the campus of the host institution as are essential to the completion of the cross registered course.


Section 408 - Assignmnet and Use of Facilities

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

408 Assignment and Use of Facilities

408.01 Assignment of Instructional Facility

A. Classrooms are assigned to a class, not a professor. If a faculty member's teaching assignment is changed, the professor is reassigned to another class with a designated room. The classes must be taught in the classroom to which they were assigned. If a classroom is unsatisfactory, a request to change the assignment should be made through the departmental chairman. The Dean's Office will consider the need for an adjustment very carefully before requesting a change from the Office of the Registrar.

B. Classroom chairs and/or tables should not be moved from one room to another by students or faculty. The classrooms are set up with maximum seating for specific types of classes and cannot be changed without adversely affecting other classes scheduled in the room.

C. Special class requirements (such as a room with tables, projection screen, etc.) should be noted on the original schedule from the Dean's Office in order that they may be given consideration.

D. Factors to be considered in setting class sizes are the course learning objectives, the level and kind of the expected student-instructor interactions, the assignment of personnel support such as graduate teaching assistants, the availability of instructional support systems and services, facility-related constraints, and workload balancing.


Section 409 - Policy on Academic Honesty

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

409 Policy on Academic Honesty

409.01 Introduction

As members of the academic community, students are expected to recognize and uphold standards of intellectual and academic integrity. The university assumes as a basic and minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that students be honest and that they submit for credit only the products of their own efforts. Both the ideals of scholarship and the need for fairness require that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit. They also require that students refrain from any and all forms of dishonorable or unethical conduct related to their academic work.

The university's policy on academic honesty is published in the Faculty Affairs Handbook and the On Campus: The Undergraduate Co-Curricular Affairs Handbook and is available to all members of the university community. The policy represents a core value of the university and all members of the university community are responsible for abiding by its tenets. Lack of knowledge of this policy is not an acceptable defense to any charge of academic dishonesty. All members of the academic community -- students, faculty, and staff -- are expected to report violations of these standards of academic conduct to the appropriate authorities. The procedures for such reporting are on file in the offices of the deans of each college, the office of the dean of students, and the office of the provost.

In an effort to foster an environment of academic integrity and to prevent academic dishonesty, students are expected to discuss with faculty the expectations regarding course assignments and standards of conduct. Students are encouraged to discuss freely with faculty, academic advisors, and other members of the university community any questions pertaining to the provisions of this policy. In addition, students are encouraged to avail themselves of programs in establishing personal standards and ethics offered through the university's Counseling Center.

409.02 Definitions and Examples

The examples and definitions given below are intended to clarify the standards by which academic honesty and academically honorable conduct are to be judged. The list is merely illustrative of the kinds of infractions that may occur, and it is not intended to be exhaustive. Moreover, the definitions and examples suggest conditions under which unacceptable behavior of the indicated types normally occurs; however, there may be unusual cases that fall outside these conditions which also will be judged unacceptable by the academic community.

A. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is presenting another person's work as one's own. Plagiarism includes any paraphrasing or summarizing of the works of another person without acknowledgment, including the submitting of another student's work as one's own. Plagiarism frequently involves a failure to acknowledge in the text, notes, or footnotes the quotation of the paragraphs, sentences, or even a few phrases written or spoken by someone else. The submission of research or completed papers or projects by someone else is plagiarism, as is the unacknowledged use of research sources gathered by someone else when that use is specifically forbidden by the faculty member. Failure to indicate the extent and nature of one's reliance on other sources is also a form of plagiarism. Any work, in whole or in part, taken from the Internet or other computer-based resource without properly referencing the source (for example, the URL) is considered plagiarism. A complete reference is required in order that all parties may locate and view the original source. Finally, there may be forms of plagiarism that are unique to an individual discipline or course, examples of which should be provided in advance by the faculty member. The student is responsible for understanding the legitimate use of sources, the appropriate ways of acknowledging academic, scholarly or creative indebtedness, and the consequences of violating this responsibility.

B. Cheating on Examinations: Cheating on examinations involves giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during, or after an examination. Examples of unauthorized help include the use of notes, computer based resources, texts, or "crib sheets" during an examination (unless specifically approved by the faculty member), or sharing information with another student during an examination (unless specifically approved by the faculty member). Other examples include intentionally allowing another student to view one's own examination and collaboration before or after an examination if such collaboration is specifically forbidden by the faculty member.

C. Unauthorized Collaboration: Submission for academic credit of a work product, or a part thereof, represented as its being one's own effort, which has been developed in substantial collaboration with another person or source, or computer-based resource, is a violation of academic honesty. It is also a violation of academic honesty knowingly to provide such assistance. Collaborative work specifically authorized by a faculty member is allowed.

D. Falsification: It is a violation of academic honesty to misrepresent material or fabricate information in an academic exercise, assignment or proceeding (e.g., false or misleading citation of sources, the falsification of the results of experiments or of computer data, false or misleading information in an academic context in order to gain an unfair advantage).

E. Multiple Submissions: It is a violation of academic honesty to submit substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once without the explicit consent of the faculty member(s) to whom the material is submitted for additional credit. In cases in which there is a natural development of research or knowledge in a sequence of courses, use of prior work may be desirable, even required; however the student is responsible for indicating in writing, as a part of such use, that the current work submitted for credit is cumulative in nature.

409.03 Evidence and Burden of Proof

In determining whether or not academic dishonesty has occurred, the standard which should be used is that guilt must be proven by a preponderance of the evidence. This means that if the evidence which indicates that academic dishonesty occurred produces a stronger impression and is more convincing as to its truth when weighed against opposing evidence, then academic dishonesty has been proved. In other words, the evidence does not have to be enough to free the mind from a reasonable doubt but must be sufficient to incline a reasonable and impartial mind to one side of the issue rather than to the other. Evidence as used in this statement can be any observation, admission, statement, or document which would either directly or circumstantially indicate that academic dishonesty has occurred.

409.04 Procedures for Resolving Matters of Academic Dishonesty

The following procedure is the only approved means for resolving matters of academic dishonesty, except for matters arising in the College of Law which has its own Honor Code for handling such matters. It is available to all members of the academic community who wish to pursue an action against a student for academic dishonesty.

A. Initiation

If a member of the academic community believes that a student has engaged in academic dishonesty in a course, on a test, or as a part of an academic program, that individual is responsible for initiating action against the student or bringing the matter to the attention of an individual who may initiate action against the student. In allegations of academic dishonesty involving course requirements, the course faculty member is generally responsible for initiating the action. If the alleged violation involves a departmental program requirement (e.g., comprehensive examination or language competency examination) or an institutionally-required test (e.g., test of Georgia/United States history or Georgia/United States constitutions), or if the individual who discovers the incident is not a faculty member, the individual should bring the matter to the attention of the faculty member and administrator who has responsibility of overseeing the activity (e.g., departmental chair, director of the Testing Office). If that administrator decides to bring charges of academic dishonesty against the student, then that administrator becomes the initiator. (Test proctors, laboratory assistants, and other individuals who are not course faculty members should bring any instances of alleged academic dishonesty to the attention of the course faculty member or their administrative superior. That individual, after weighing the evidence, may become the initiator by formally charging the student with academic dishonesty.)

The channel of review, recommendation, and decision-making follows the administrative lines associated with the course or program requirement involved. In any instance, however, when the alleged incident does not occur within the context of a course and when it is unclear which college of more than one college involved should have jurisdiction in review and decision-making, either unit may initiate the case.

For the sake of brevity the following processing procedures are written from an "academic unit/college" perspective. Nonacademic units (i.e., Testing Center) would substitute appropriate supervisory personnel at the respective levels. Herein the "initiator" will be referred to as "faculty member" and the "administrative unit head" will be referred to as "chair," designating the departmental chair. "Dean" will refer to appropriate administrative supervisory personnel at the overall college or division level.

While the matter of academic dishonesty is pending, the student will be allowed to continue in the course and register for upcoming terms. Should a grade be due to the registrar before the matter is resolved, a grade of GP (grade pending) will be reported for the student in the course involved. Withdrawal from a course does not preclude the imposition of penalties for academic dishonesty.

B. Penalties to be Imposed

Penalties to be imposed in incidents of academic dishonesty are classified as "academic" or "disciplinary." Academic penalties include such sanctions as assignment of a failing grade for a particular course requirement, or for the course itself, or for other tests or program assignments. They are set by the faculty member. Disciplinary sanctions can be sought in addition to those considered academic and could include, but are not limited to, the following penalties: suspension, expulsion, transcript annotations. Disciplinary penalties can be requested by the faculty member, in consultation with the chair; they must be reviewed by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline and they are set by the provost.

C. Action at Administrative Unit (Department Level)

As soon as possible after the alleged incident, the faculty member should discuss the matter with the student. This discussion should be conducted in a manner which protects the rights and confidentiality of students. If the faculty member believes that academic dishonesty has occurred, the faculty member (with the advice of the chair if necessary) will determine the appropriate academic penalty. The faculty member will complete a "notice of academic dishonesty" form describing the incident and indicating the academic penalty imposed. Any recommendation for a disciplinary penalty must be reviewed in consultation with the chair.

The faculty member will deliver to the student the notice of academic dishonesty which includes a statement of appeal rights. If there is difficulty in delivering the notice to the student, the faculty member/chair should request assistance from the college dean in determining the most expeditious way to inform the student that a notice of academic dishonesty has been filed.

Once the student has been informed, the chair forwards the documentation, including the notice of academic dishonesty and an indication of when the student was informed, to the dean to be held pending possible appeal. Until the student has been given the opportunity to appeal, a grade of GP (grade pending) should be submitted for the student for the course involved.

D. Student Action

The student will have 20 business days after receipt of the notice of charges of academic dishonesty to submit a written appeal denying the charges and providing any rationale for the appeal. The appeal should be addressed to the college dean of the initiator. In the event the student is found guilty of academic dishonesty, the student does not have the right to appeal the academic penalty assessed by the faculty member, unless the student can prove that such penalty was arbitrarily imposed or discriminatorily applied.

If the student wishes to challenge a disciplinary penalty, the student must submit a written rationale for challenging the disciplinary penalty within 20 business days of receipt of the notice of charges of academic dishonesty. The statement of challenge should be addressed to the college dean. The college dean will forward the challenge to the dean of students for inclusion in the review of the disciplinary penalty by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline. All disciplinary penalties are automatically reviewed by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline, regardless of student appeal.

If the student has also filed an appeal denying the charges of academic dishonesty, any review of disciplinary penalty recommended will be delayed pending review of the charges of academic dishonesty by the college hearing committee.

E. College Action

1. No Appeal by the Student. If the student does not submit a written appeal to the college dean within 20 business days, the dean will notify the chair/faculty member to post any pending grade(s) immediately. The dean will then forward the notice of academic dishonesty to the dean of students for inclusion in the student's disciplinary file. Any recommendation of a disciplinary penalty will also be forwarded to the dean of students for appropriate review by the Senate Committee on Student Discipline.

2. Appeal by the Student. If the student submits a written appeal within 20 business days, the dean will notify the registrar to issue a grade of GP (grade pending) for the course(s) in question on all transcript requests for the student pending outcome of the appeal. The dean will forward the charges of academic dishonesty to the chair of a college hearing committee and will notify the faculty member to set forth in writing a comprehensive statement describing the incident of academic dishonesty. This statement will be presented to the committee and to the student at least five (5) business days prior to the hearing.

3. Student Hearing Committee Process. The following guidelines will be used to govern the hearing of the appeal by the college student hearing committee:

a. Within ten (10) business days after the committee receives the charges of academic dishonesty, a hearing date will be determined. The committee will notify the faculty member and the student of the time, date, and the place of the hearing. Copies of all charges of academic dishonesty and related materials for the hearing will be provided to the student at least five (5) business days in advance of the hearing.

b. The faculty member and the student will be allowed to make oral presentations, call witnesses, and present any documentary evidence regarding the incident in question. The hearing will be recorded on audio tape. The hearing will not be open to observers.

c. At the conclusion of the hearing, the committee will meet in closed session and will make its recommendation as to the guilt or innocence of the student based on a preponderance of evidence with respect to the charge of academic dishonesty. The committee chair will forward to the college dean its findings and recommendations in a written report within five (5) business days of the hearing.

4. College Decision on Appeals. Within five (5) business days of receiving the committee's written report, the college dean will make the final decision regarding guilt or innocence. The dean will notify all appropriate parties of the decision.

If the dean finds the student "not guilty," the matter will be terminated and no notice of charges will be filed with the dean of students. The dean will notify the chair to post the pending course grade promptly and will notify the registrar to remove the GP (grade pending) on the student's transcript.

If the dean finds the student "guilty," the notice of charges of academic dishonesty will be forwarded to the dean of students for inclusion in the student's disciplinary file. The academic penalty stipulated by the faculty member will be imposed. The dean will notify the chair to insure that any pending grade is posted promptly. The dean will notify the registrar to remove the GP (grade pending) on the student's transcript if only an academic penalty was involved. If a disciplinary penalty has been recommended, the dean will notify the registrar to continue the GP (grade pending) annotation until the disciplinary penalty can be reviewed by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline.

5. Appeal of the Decision of the Dean. If the student or initiator wishes to appeal the decision of the college dean regarding guilt or innocence of the charges of academic dishonesty, the student or initiator may appeal to the provost. The subsequent appeal route would be to the president and then the Board of Regents. The student or initiator must submit a written statement of appeal to the provost within 20 business days of notification of the dean's decision. The basis of the appeal must be on the grounds that the decision was arbitrary, capricious, or discriminatory.

6. University Senate Committee on Student Discipline Action. In cases where a disciplinary penalty has been recommended, the Senate Committee on Student Discipline will conduct a hearing to review the disciplinary penalty. The committee will review the faculty member's notice of academic dishonesty and the student's statement of challenge of the disciplinary penalty, if any. The faculty member and the student will be allowed to appear at the hearing to discuss the imposition of disciplinary penalties. Only the recommendation concerning the disciplinary penalty to be imposed will be considered by this committee. Issues of guilt or innocence are determined at the college level (see IV.3 and IV.4 above).

The Senate Committee will conduct the hearing in accordance with its regular hearing procedures. Copies of these procedures may be obtained from the Provost's Office and/or the Dean of Students.

The Senate Committee on Student Discipline will provide its recommendation within five (5) business days of its hearing to the provost regarding appropriateness of the disciplinary penalty recommended by the college and/or whether other disciplinary penalties are to be imposed in addition to or in lieu of those already recommended by the college.

F. Provost Action

1. Decision of the Provost. The role of the provost in handling student appeals regarding the charge of academic honesty has been explained (see IV.5.5 above). Based on the recommendation, the Provost will render a decision within ten (10) business days of receipt of the recommendation of the Senate Committee. The provost will notify the student, the referring dean, the department chair and the faculty member of the Senate Committee's recommendations and of the provost's decision. At that time the provost will also notify the registrar to annotate the student's transcript, if necessary.

2. Appeal of the Decision of the Provost. If the student wishes to appeal the decision of the provost regarding the imposition of a disciplinary penalty, the student may appeal to the president, and then to the Board of Regents. The student must submit a written statement of appeal to the president within 20 business days of notification of the provost's decision. The basis for such an appeal must be on the grounds that the decision was arbitrary, capricious, or discriminatory.

G. Students Involved in Two or More Incidents of Academic Dishonesty

A student is subject to disciplinary action in addition to any already undertaken once it is determined that the student has been found guilty in a previous incident of academic dishonesty. In such cases, the dean of students will forward a report to the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline regarding the incidents of academic dishonesty which have been reported. The dean of students is responsible for initiating this report within twenty (20) business days of completion of proceeding of any subsequent finding of academic dishonesty.

The University Senate Committee on Student Discipline will review the report of the dean of students. The student may submit supplemental written documents for the committee's review and may request to appear before the committee in its deliberations. After reviewing the matter, the committee will send a report to the provost with the recommendation for disciplinary penalty to be imposed. The provost will proceed as in IV.7 above.

(Source: Senate Office, 9/7/95

Approved by the University Senate Committee on Admissions and Standards: 3/14/94

Approved by the University Senate: 11/3/94)

Note: The following form is a part of this policy as approved by the Senate.


Georgia State University

Notice of Academic Dishonesty

TO THE STUDENT: This serves as notification to you that the below signed individual has found you in violation of the University policy on academic honesty and has established the penalty(ies) described below.

You have a right to deny this finding of academic dishonesty and request a college hearing to determine your guilt or innocence. The academic penalty recommended below cannot be challenged. If a disciplinary penalty has been recommended below, you have a right to challenge the disciplinary penalty (whether or not you accept the finding of academic dishonesty) and to appear before the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline; this committee automatically reviews all recommendations for student disciplinary sanctions.

To deny the finding of academic dishonesty or to challenge a recommendation for a disciplinary penalty, you must submit within 20 business days of receipt of this notice a written statement to the college dean requesting either or both of these actions. If you do not respond within 20 business days, it will be assumed that you have accepted this finding of academic dishonesty and that you have waived the right to challenge the disciplinary penalty, if any, recommended below. This notice of academic dishonesty will then be included in your disciplinary file in the Dean of Students' Office. This information (unless the disciplinary penalty recommended below, if any, specifically indicates otherwise) is not included in your permanent academic record and is used for disciplinary purposes only. Multiple findings of academic dishonesty may result in additional recommendations for disciplinary sanctions.

Definition of penalties and a summary of review and processing procedures are contained on the reverse of this notice. A complete copy of the university's policy and procedures regarding academic honesty can be obtained from the dean of the college or the dean of students.





Student Name ____________________________ SSN ______________________

Course _______________________ Comp # ___________ Term/Yr _______________

Instructor ____________________________ College __________________________







Statement of finding of academic dishonesty by initiator:

_____________________________________________________________________



_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________



Academic penalty recommended:

_____________________________________________________________________



Disciplinary penalty recommended, if any:

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________







_____________________________________

Initiator's Signature Date

Date student notified ____________________


DEFINITION OF ACADEMIC PENALTY: Sanction sought for academic dishonesty will be considered an academic penalty if the initiator wishes to assess penalty for academic assignments only, such as a failing grade to the student for a particular course assignment, or for the course itself, or for other tests or program requirements involved in the incident. The academic penalty cannot be challenged.

DEFINITION OF DISCIPLINARY PENALTY: Sanction sought for academic dishonesty will be considered a disciplinary penalty if the initiator wishes to seek sanction in addition to those considered as academic. Disciplinary penalties could include, but are not limited to, the following sanctions: suspension, expulsion, transcript annotation(s). Students may challenge a disciplinary penalty regardless of whether the student accepts findings of academic dishonesty. All disciplinary penalties are automatically reviewed by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline.

STUDENT DISCIPLINARY RECORD: The Dean of Students' Office maintains a disciplinary record on any student who has been reported for any disciplinary sanction, including cases of academic dishonesty. This record is not a part of the student's permanent academic record (unless disciplinary sanction imposed is specifically designated to be public record). If two or more incidents of academic dishonesty are filed against a student, or if record of other disciplinary problems exists, additional disciplinary sanctions may be sought.

SUMMARY OF REVIEW AND PROCESSING PROCEDURES: For the sake of brevity, the following review and processing summary is written from an "academic unit/college" perspective. Non-academic units (i.e. Testing Center) would substitute appropriate supervisory personnel at the respective levels.

1. The faculty member gives the student notice of academic dishonesty and forwards the notice to the college dean to hold pending a possible appeal by the student.

2. The student must appeal in writing within 20 business days to the college dean if the student wishes to deny the finding of academic dishonesty or challenge a disciplinary penalty.

3. If the student does not appeal within 20 business days, the college dean forwards the notice of academic dishonesty to the dean of students.

4. If the student appeals the charges, a college hearing committee conducts a hearing and reports its findings to the college dean regarding guilt or innocence. If the student is found not guilty, the notice of academic dishonesty is destroyed and the faculty member is notified to assign an appropriate grade. If the student is found guilty, the dean forwards the notice of academic dishonesty to the dean of students and if necessary to the registrar.

5. Any recommendation for a disciplinary penalty and a challenge of that disciplinary penalty submitted by the student, if any, is reviewed by the University Senate Committee on Student Discipline. Based on the committee's recommendation, the provost makes a decision and takes action regarding any disciplinary sanction.

6. The dean of students maintains the disciplinary records on all findings of academic dishonesty and is responsible for forwarding notice of multiple findings.

(Source: Senate Office, 9/7/95

Approved by the University Senate Committee on Admissions and Standards: 3/14/94

Approved by the University Senate: 11/3/94)


Section 410 - Sources of Academic Support for Students

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

410 Sources of Academic Support for Students

410.01 Undergraduate Studies

The Office of Undergraduate Studies offers special programs designed to increase student success, emphasize student-centered learning, provide academic services, and develop student community involvement. Programs and services include:

  1. Student Success Workshops that provide assistance to students who want to be more effective or efficient in time management, note taking, memorization, and related study skills;
  2. academic coaching to students who want to develop an individual action plan for their scholastic goals and learning strategies;
  3. The Office of Latino Support Services that provides peer mentors and other acadmeic outreach to Latino students;
  4. the Supplemental Instruction Program that holds tutoring sessions for students in targeted courses in the general education curriculum;
  5. the Scholarship Office that offers scholarship information to currently enrolled students;
  6. the Atlanta Based Learning program that promotes opportunities for civic engagement in the Atlanta community; and
  7. the coordination of Freshment Learning Communities, the New Student Orientation Course, GSU 1010, and all Univerisity Perspectives classes.

410.02 Writing Studio

Sponsored by the Department of English, the Writing Studio is a resource for students needing advice and tutoring in composition. It is designed specifically to provide support services for students taking composition and other English courses and for students preparing for the Regents' Examination.

410.03 Mathematics Assistance Complex

Sponsored by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, the Mathematics Assistance Complex provides tutorial services for students enrolled in mathematics courses.

410.04 Computer Facilities

Available in the Computer Center and in specially designated classrooms in various places on campus there are computer terminal facilities available for faculty and student use. Faculty should check with User Services for information about access to computer terminals and to personal computers for their use and for the use of their students.

410.05 Student Support Services Program

The Special Services Program provides tutoring, counseling, and advocacy for eligible students. A significant emphasis of the program is academic services for disabled students. Services are provided for students with visual, auditory, orthopedic, medical, or learning disabilities.

Also eligible for services are students from educationally and/or financially disadvantaged backgrounds.

Faculty are encouraged to refer eligible students to program staff and/or to contact program staff for information on how best to serve special student populations.

The Student Support Services Program at Georgia State University offers the following services.

Tutoring: Tutorial assistance is offered in the subject areas where students are experiencing difficulty. Tutors are chosen among undergraduate and graduate students having demonstrated academic expertise.

Counseling: Counseling activities are scheduled for all interested project participants dealing with specific personal, academic and vocational interests. In addition, the project serves as a referral source to accommodate individual needs.

Workshops: Various workshops covering a wide range of topics are made available on a continuous basis.

Activities: An annual Awards Reception is held honoring students with outstanding academic achievement. Students are presented with certificates indicating their accomplishment(s).

When requested students are provided an Advocacy Letter for their instructor indicating their disability and particular accommodation needed.

Special Assistance for Handicapped Students Includes:

410.06 Disability Services Office

Georgia State University has been in the process of developing a program of campus accessibility and services since 1973. Support services are available to faculty through two offices. The Director of Disability Services and the Student Support Services office (see previous item), work closely together in providing services for faculty and students with disabilities.

The College Student with a Disability: A Faculty Handbook is a guide containing a wealth of information, written specifically for faculty, regarding classroom accommodation. All faculty should have a handbook. New faculty receive a handbook at the beginning of Fall Semester.

The Director of Disability Services coordinates services and provides resources which allow students with temporary or permanent disabilities to function as independently as possible. These services offer the disabled student the opportunity to obtain a higher education and to experience those things which are common to all college students. Established services are as follows:

A. General Services

- Counseling

- Advocacy

- Handbook describing services and detailed maps of campus and buildings

- Five student assistants available from 8:30 AM - 8:00 PM

- Cooperative Learning Lab & Learning Assistance Center

- Registration assistance

- Parking

- Testing: Special arrangements for placement tests and institutional tests (CPE: MAT) should be made by contacting the Testing Center at 651-2217. For the Regents Exam contact the Office of Disability Services at 463-9050. For national tests such as the GRE, GMAT, NTE, LSAT, SAT, PEP, ACT, or CLEP contact the specific national testing organization. Registration forms are available in the Testing Center. Career testing is conducted through the Counseling Center, 651-2211.

- Orientation

- Library assistance

- Library of publications, newsletters, catalogs, videos, books having to do with concerns of people with disabilities

- Study/Testing Lab

- In consultation with the professor, various forms of testing accommodations may be provided, such as:

a) extended test time

b) test proctor/scribe

c) test administration in alternate location

d) modification of test format

e) test proctor to transcribe tests

f) sound suppression headphones

- Maintenance of schedule of classes of students with disabilities for emergency purposes

- Assistance in purchasing textbooks from the bookstore

- Emergency wheelchairs

- Inservice orientation for faculty

- Assistance in the cafeteria

- Private testing rooms

- Voice activated software for computer (Dragon Dictate)

- Tutorial services for most core curriculum classes

B. Services for the Blind/Visually Impaired

- IBM Personal Computer with voice output and Zoomtext

- Braille Dictionaries located in the Reference section of the University Library

- Audible fire alarm system

- Readers and taping service

- Assistance in ordering of textbooks from Recordings for the Blind

- Perkins Brailler and Braille printer

- 2 Vantages and one Optelec (CCTV magnification system) located in Disability Lab and one Vantage in the Media Center, Library

- Kurzweil Reading Machine and Arkenstone Open Book Scanner

- All services listed under number 1 - General Services

C. Services for Deaf/Hearing Impaired

- TDD (404) 651-1487 & Relay service for text-phone users 1-800-855-1155

- Interpreter or transcription service for classrooms

- Photocopying service

- Visual fire alarm system

- Assistive Listening Devices

- All services listed under #1 - General Services

D. Services for Mobility and Hand Impaired

- Overnight wheelchair storage and recharging of batteries

- Assistance in moving from automobile to class

- Aid in performing physical tasks unique to mobility and hand impaired

- Accessible shower facilities in Gym and Aquatics Building; shower wheelchairs available

- All services listed under #1 - General Services

E. Services for Learning Disabled

- Special class taught by Student Support Services

- Assistance in ordering textbooks from Recordings for the Blind

- Readers

- Test proctors

- Transcription service

- Taping service

- 2 Vantages and one Optelec (CCTV magnification system) located in Disability Lab and one Vantage in the Media Center, Library

- Kurzweil Reading Machine and Arkenstone Open Book Scanner

- All services listed under #1 - General Services

F. Services for Head-Injured

- Photocopying service

- Test proctors

- Readers

- Tutors

- Use of tape recorder in class

- All services listed under #1 - General Services

G. Services for Psychologically Impaired

- Use of tape recorder in class

- Testing accommodation

H. Chronic Illness (asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, heart, psychological, arthritis, back injury or disease, AIDS/HIV, etc.)

- Adapted desks and chairs for classroom

- Testing accommodation

- Voice activated software for computer

410.07 Cooperative Education and Internship Program

The Cooperative Education and Internship program at Georgia State University is designed to enhance the educational experience of students by providing them the opportunity to alternate or intersperse periods of meaningful work related to their academic fields or areas of career interest with periods of academic study. This program requires the cooperation of the University, the employer, and the student to provide the student with a superior education. Cooperative education opportunities and internships blend theory with practice and gives relevance to the classroom experience. The program offers the student practical experience and insight into the realities of the workplace, as well as a means of earning money. For information, contact University Career Services.

410.08 African American Student Services and Programs

The Office of African American Student Services and Programs was established to coordinate efforts to enhance (1) retention and advisement of minority students and (2) identification and recruitment of prospective minority faculty.

Among its functions are to develop and coordinate supplemental advisement programs for minority students, serve as liaison to student/academic minority organizations, develop and monitor programs to increase retention of minority students and assist in campus retention studies, identify and encourage potential minority graduate students and coordinate GSU participation in System minority graduate recruitment efforts, represent GSU on the National Consortium for Educational Access Board, assist in the identification and recruitment of potential minority faculty, and increase the sensitivity of faculty to the special needs of minority students.


Section 411 - University Safety/Emergency Procedures

400 ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL INFORMATION

411 University Safety/Emergency Procedures

411.01 Discovery or Suspicion of Fire

A person should:

A. Immediately call University Police (Ext. 3-3333):

identify him/herself;

identify building and room number;

identify telephone number from which the individual is calling; and

stay on the line until Police have all requested information.

B. Sound the nearest building evacuation alarm by red pulling stations in corridors near all exits.

C. Take prompt emergency measures, if practical and safe to do so, to confine the fire using available personnel. If fire is large or out of control or the situation is no longer safe, abandon all fighting attempts and immediately evacuate the building.

411.02 Building Evacuation Alarm

When a building evacuation alarm sounds and/or flashes, a person should:

A. Assume there is a fire.

B. Close all windows and doors in the area, if possible; assist physically impaired personnel to the designated area of refuge or if the situation warrants and you have the capability, assist physically impaired personnel down the stairs. If you assist in moving a physically disabled person to an area of refugee, immediately report their name, disposition, and location to a responding official.

C. Leave the building by means of the nearest stairwell and exit as quickly and quietly as possible;

do not use elevators;

follow lighted exit signs;

before opening any closed doors en route, feel them for heat, to prevent suddenly entering a fire area; and

upon encountering smoke, remain as low to the floor as possible.

D. Report to the GSU Police or public agency responding orricials as to the locations of physically impaired personnel.

E. Re-enter the building only when the University Police or the respective public agency allow it.

For more detailed information regarding fire related evaluations, see the University Emergency Operations Plan.


End of Section 400