8. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in astronomy must take the second general examination, administered as a written and oral examination, after passing at least 20 hours of 800-level astronomy courses and at least 15 hours of required 800-level physics courses.
9. Students pursuing the Ph.D. degree are strongly urged to satisfy the requirements for the M.S. (nonthesis option) as soon as possible after entering the program. For such students the general examination will consist of an oral examination given by the student's Ph.D. committee and the research paper should be related to the anticipated topic of the dissertation.
10. An oral presentation discussing the student's proposed dissertation research.
11. A dissertation.
12. An oral examination on the completed dissertation.

Prior to registration each quarter, students must be advised by either the chair or the appropriate director of graduate studies.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Physics and Astronomy by contacting the
Director of Graduate Studies in (indicate either Physics or Astronomy)
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Georgia State University
University Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 651-3221 (for Physics)
(404) 651-1367 (for Astronomy).


Course Descriptions

NOTE: Course credit hours are shown in parentheses immediately following the course title. Courses numbered 700-799 are professional courses designed for students seeking the M.Ed. degree and will not count toward the M.S. or Ph.D. degree offered by the department.

Astronomy

Astr 600. Fundamentals of Astrophysics. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Application of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics to the solution of astrophysical problems. Course is prerequisite for all 800-level astronomy courses.

Astr 610. Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation. (5) Fundamentals and practical application of photography, spectroscopy, photometry, astrometry, interferometry, and current developments in detector technology and telescope design.

Astr 704. Space and Planetary Science. (5) Space astronomy, satellites and techniques; manned and unmanned exploration of the moon and planets; lunar and planetary interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres; origin and evolution of the solar system.

Astr 705. Astronomy for Teachers. (5) Designed to give teachers a basic understanding of the fundamentals of astronomy and to prepare them to incorporate this knowledge in their teaching.

Astr 800. Stellar Atmospheres. (5) Physics of radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the formation of continuous and line spectra with particular emphasis on the spectroscopic analysis of stellar photospheres and chromospheres.

Astr 810. Stellar Structure. (5) Applications of the equations of stellar structure to models of stellar interiors on the Main Sequence: thermodynamics, hydrostatics, energy transport, nuclear energy generation; rotation, pulsations.

Astr 815. Stellar Evolution. (5) Prerequisite: Astr 810. Comparison between the observed and calculated evolutionary behavior of stars; protostars, red giants, white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes.

Astr 820. Galactic Structure. (5) Structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way Galaxy and its various components.

Astr 830. The Interstellar Medium. (5) Physical conditions within the various components of the interstellar medium and the observational approaches to understanding these components.

Astr 840. Extragalactic Astronomy. (5) Observed distribution and properties of normal galaxies, active galaxies, and quasars; cosmology.

Astr 850. Binary Stars. (5) Various observational approaches to the study of binary stars; their formation, evolution, statistics and importance in astrophysics.

Astr 860. Stellar Spectroscopy. (5) Prerequisite: Astr 800. Multilayer stellar atmosphere models; absorption line formation, deviations from local thermodynamical equilibrium, determinations of chemical abundances in stars.

Astr 870. Relativistic Astrophysics. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 671. Introduction to the theory of general relativity; coordinate systems, tensor analysis, and Einstein's equations. Applications to problems of astronomical concern such as black holes, quasars, and relativistic cosmologies. Astr 890. Seminar in Astronomy. (1-5) Prerequisite: departmental consent.

If Astr 890 is repeated, no more than five (5) credit hours may be accumulated. Discussion of current research in astronomy.

*Astr 891. Directed Study in Astronomy. (1-5) Area of study and credit to be determined by the department.

Physics

Phys 651. Mathematics of Physics I. (5) Algebra of vectors, vector calculus, divergence, gradient, curl, line integrals, surface integrals, divergence theorem of Gauss, Stokes' theorem, conservative fields, orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, matrices, eigen value problems.

Phys 652. Mathematics of Physics II. (5) Derivation and solution of partial differential equations of physics, wave equation, Laplace's equation, Schroedinger's equation, power series solution or ordinary differential equations, special functions of mathematical physics, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville system, complex analysis and integration.

Phys 661. Intermediate Classical Mechanics. (5) Lagrange's equations, tensor algebra, inertia tensor, rotation of a rigid body, theory of small vibrations.

Phys 671. Intermediate Electromagnetic Theory. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 652 or equivalent. Poisson's and Laplace's equations, multipole expansions, boundary value problems in free space and materials. Development of field theory leading to Maxwell's equations.

Phys 681. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (5) Schroedinger's theory of quantum mechanics; solutions of Schroedinger's equation; perturbation theory; one-electron atoms; magnetic moments, spin, and relativistic effects; identical particles; multi-electron atoms.

Phys 701. Foundations of Physical Science. (5) Basic principles of physical science and their relation to the teaching of science in grades K-8.

Phys 711. Conceptual Physics I. (5) No prerequisites. Designed for science teachers in the secondary and middle schools. No prior knowledge of physics is assumed. Course includes both lecture and laboratory. Dynamics, energy concepts, properties of matter, heat and thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism.

Phys 712. Conceptual Physics II. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 711 or equivalent. Sound, light, atomic and nuclear physics, relativity and astrophysics, energy and the future, advancing technology.

Phys 745. Physics for Secondary School Teachers. (5) Designed both to refresh and enlarge the high school teacher's knowledge of general physics.

Phys 746. Modern Physics for Secondary Teachers I. (5) Prerequisite: general physics. Physical and quantum optics, introduction to special relativity, quantum mechanics and atomic structure.

Phys 747. Modern Physics for Secondary Teachers II. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 746 or consent of instructor. Introduction to x-ray spectra, molecular structure, solid state physics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions.

Phys 760. Classical Mechanics. (5) Elements of Newtonian mechanics; motion of a particle in one, two, or three dimensions; motion of a system of particles; rigid bodies, gravitation; moving coordinate systems.

Phys 770. Electricity and Magnetism. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 651 or equivalent. Electrostatics, steady currents, the magnetic fields, magnetic induction, AC circuits, dielectrics, magnetic properties of matter.

Phys 780. Optics. (5) Fundementals and applications of optics: diffraction, interference, lasers, fiber optics, and applications of optical instrumentation.

Phys 785. Statistical and Thermal Physics. (5) Prerequisites; general physics and calculus. Kinetic and statistical theories of matter and their relation to classical thermal physics.

Phys 801. Advanced Classical Mechanics. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 661 or equivalent. Advanced classical mechanics including Hamilton's principle, Lagrange's equations, the two-body central force problem, rigid body motion, the Hamilton equations of motion, canonical transformations, and an introduction to Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

Phys 811. Advanced Electromagnetic The~-ory. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 671 or equiva~-lent. Maxwell's equations, wave equations and solutions, wave solutions in the presence of metallic boundaries, radiation from an accelerated charge, relativistic electrodynamics.

Phys 812. Plasma Physics. (5) Prerequisites: Astr 600, Phys 811 or permission of instructor. Nature of ionized gases; waves in plasmas; transport phenomena in plasmas; stability of plasma configurations. Applications in astrophysical situations including solar coronal physics, synchrotron and coherent radiation, pulsars, quasars, and radio galaxies.

Phys 821. Quantum Mechanics I. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 681 or consent of instructor. Postulates, Schroedinger's equation, one-dimensional problems, three-di~-men~-sional problems, scattering, transformation theory, perturbation theory, Born approximation, variation method.

Phys 822. Quantum Mechanics II. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 821. Spin, relativistic effects, many-electron atoms, second quantization, radiation field, Dirac equation, Feynman diagrams.

Phys 831. Statistical Mechanics. (5) Classical and quantum mechanical statistical theories of many body systems. Topics include the ergodic theorem, distributions, quantum statistics, thermodynamic interpretations, and applications.

Phys 841. Atomic Physics. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 681 or consent of instructor. Theory of atomic spectra; scattering theory.

Phys 842. Molecular Physics. (5) Molecular structure, molecular orbital theory, molecular spectra.

Phys 851. Solid State Physics. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 681 or consent of instructor. Thermal, electrical, magnetic, and mechanical properties of solids; crystal structure; free-electron theory of metals; band theory of solids.

Phys 861. Nuclear Physics. (5) Prerequisite: Phys 681. Nuclear forces, size of nuclei, nuclear moments and shapes, nuclear models, electromagnetic properties of nuclei, particle radioactivity, and nuclear reactions and collisions.

Phys 865. Fundamentals of Particles and Interactions. (5) Prerequisites: Phys 681 or equivalent. Overview of particle physics, leptons and hadrons, quark model, symmetries, weak and strong interactions, quantum electro- and chromo-dynamics, gauge theories.

*Phys 871. Research Topics in Physics. (5) Topics related to area of current research to be chosen by the instructor.

Phys 880. Electronics. (5) Three lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Principles of D.C. and A.C. circuits; introduction to design of analog and digital circuits; discrete and integrated circuit devices; elements of electronic instrumentation systems. (Not open to physics and astronomy students.)

Phys 881. Digital Instrumentation. (5) Three lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite: Phys 880 or equivalent experience. Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion; parallel and serial data transfer; microprocessor fundamentals; microprocessor interfacing for data acquisition and instrument control.

*Phys 891. Directed Study in Physics. (1-5) Area of study and credit to be determined by the department.

Phys 899. Thesis Research. (1-15)

Phys 999. Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-15)
*May be taken more than once if topics are different.


Department of Political Science

F. Glenn Abney, Chair
Michael B. Binford, Director of Graduate Studies


Degrees offered: Master of Arts Doctor of Philosophy

The general purpose of the Master of Arts (M.A) degree program is to assist and to guide students in the development of analytical and critical capabilities through inquiry into political and governmental processes. The basic objective of the program is to provide education for persons interested in pursuing teaching, research, or administrative careers in public or quasi-public institutions. Students can choose either a degree program that will provide them with a general knowledge of the discipline, or one that will provide them with a specialization in public administration, in electoral politics, or in international relations.
      A Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is offered in political science with the objectives of providing a broad, educational development program for those in public service, of preparing men and women for teaching and research careers, and of developing research skills among those enrolled in the program. Additional

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Political Science has the following requirements:

1. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must submit:
    a Acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate  Record  Examination.
    b. A 3.3 cumulative grade-point average.
    c. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential to do graduate work in
          political science.

Note: Applicants must have completed a M.A. degree in political science or closely related field.

2. Applicants to the M.A. program must submit:
      a. Acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record  Examination.
      b. A 3.0 cumulative grade-point average.
      c. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant's potential to  do graduate work in
              political science.

Degree Requirements

MASTER OF ARTS (55-hour program)

1. PolS 801. Scope of Political Science
2. PolS 802. Research Methods in Political Science
3. Twenty-five hours of coursework chosen from at least three of the following fields: American  government and politics,
         public policy and administration, comparative government and  politics, political theory, international relations and foreign        policy.
4. One elective course that may be taken in a field other than political science.
5. A written general examination. NOTE: Students must be registered for five hours of PolS 890  during the quarter in which
     they take the general examination.
6. Proficiency in a foreign language or in an approved equivalent research skill.
7a. Thesis option:
     a. A minimum of ten hours of PolS 899, Thesis Research.
     b. A thesis. c. A thesisdefense.
7b. Non-thesis option:
     a. Ten additional hours of coursework in graduate political science courses.      
     b. A research paper completed according to departmental guidelines.

SPECIALIZATION IN ELECTORAL POLITICS

1. PolS 802. Research Methods in Political Science
2. PolS 819. Campaign Organization and Management
3. PolS 837. Electoral Behavior
4. PolS 838. Public Opinion and Political Communication
5. Twenty hours of coursework (or thirty hours if student pursues the nonthesis option) selected  from among the following
          courses:

PolS 800. Seminar in American Politics.
PolS 801. Scope of Political Science.
PolS 809. American Constitutional Law.
PolS 810. Judicial Process and Policy Making.
PolS 811. Public Law and Public Administration.
PolS 812. Seminar in Civil Liberties.
PolS 813. Chief Executives.
PolS 815. African-American Political Participation.
PolS 816. Studies in the Legislative Process.
PolS 830. Political Parties and Interest Groups.
PolS 832. Studies in American Politics.
PolS 833. State Politics.
PolS 835. Women and Politics.
PolS 840. Urban Political Process.
PolS 843. Public Organizations.
PolS 896. Practicum.

      One elective outside the department can be taken with adviser's approval.
6. A written general examination.

      NOTE: Students must be registered for five hours of PolS 890 during the quarter in which they take the general examination.

7. Proficiency in a foreign language or in an approved equivalent research skill.
8a. Thesis option:
      a. A minimum of ten hours of PolS 899, Thesis Research.
      b. A thesis.
      c. A thesis defense.
8b. Non-thesis option:
      a. Ten additional hours of graduate political science courses.
      b. A research paper completed according to departmental guidelines.

SPECIALIZATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

1. PolS 802. Research Methods in Political Science
2. Two of the following core requirement courses:
      PolS 820. Comparative Politics
      PolS 863. United States Foreign Policy
      PolS 865. International Politics
3. Two of the following core elective courses:
      PolS 822. Studies in Comparative Political Theory
      PolS 824. Latin American Politics
      PolS 825. Comparative Political Systems
      PolS 826. Political Modernization
      PolS 827. European Politics
      PolS 864. Studies in Foreign Policy
      PolS 868. Studies in International Relations

      NOTE: Students may take PolS 820, 863, or 865 as core electives if not taken to fulfill core requirements.

4. Fifteen hours of general electives approved by the student's adviser.
5. Proficiency in a foreign language or in an approved equivalent research skill.
6. A written general examination.

      NOTE: Students must be registered for five hours of PolS 890 during the quarter in which they  take the general                         examination.

7a. Thesis option:
      a. A minimum of ten hours of PolS 899, Thesis Research.
      b. A thesis.
      c. A thesis defense.
7b. Non-thesis option:
      a. Ten additional hours of graduate coursework in political science.
      b. A research paper completed according to departmental guidelines.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (90-hour program beyond the master's degree)

1. PolS 801. Scope of Political Science
2. PolS 802. Research Methods in Political Science

      NOTE: These requirements may be waived by the department if students have had equivalent  courses elsewhere.

3. A minimum of 45 hours of coursework beyond the M.A. degree.
4. A general examination in three of the following fields: American government, comparative politics,  international relations and
     foreign policy, political theory, public policy and administration.

      NOTE: Students must be registered for five hours of PolS 890, Comprehensive Readings, during the quarter in which they                     take the general examinations. On approval of the department, one field may be taken in a discipline outside                     political science.

5. Satisfaction of the foreign language requirement (Contact the department for details).
6. Thirty hours of PolS 899, Thesis Research.
7. A dissertation.
8. A dissertation defense.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Political Science by contacting the:
Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Political Science
Georgia State University
University Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 651-3152.


Course Descriptions

NOTE: Course credit hours are shown in parentheses immediately following the course title.

Students are advised to contact the director of graduate studies regarding any additions or changes to the course offerings.

Fields of Political Science

Core Courses

PolS 801. Scope of Political Science. (5) Philosophical and analytical foundations of scientific inquiry into political phenomena, with particular emphasis on the interrelations of political science and the other social sciences.

PolS 802. Research Methods in Political Science. (5) Intensive examination of the various research techniques used in contemporary political science and an analysis of how these techniques have developed in response to the research of the discipline.

*PolS 803. Studies in Research Methodology. (5) (Repeatable course.) Intensive examination of a particular methodological skill or skills.

American Government and Politics

PolS 800. Seminar in American Politics. (5) Introduction to the major institutions and processes in the national political system. Overview of Congress, the Executive Branch, and the Supreme Court

PolS 809. American Constitutional Law. (5) Selected cases and theory involving basic principles of constitutional law as interpreted by the U. S. Supreme Court.

PolS 810. Judicial Process and Policy Making. (5) Social and political context of judicial decisions with emphasis on Supreme Court decision making. Relation of law to public policy.

*PolS 812. Seminar in Civil liberties.(5) Major issues and Supreme Court decisions in the area on constitutional rights and liberties.

PolS 813. Chief Executives. (5) Functions and roles of chief executives in American politics.

PolS 815. African-American Political Participation. (5) Voting behaviors and ideological orientation of African-Americans. Changes in the nature and effectiveness of African-American participation from the protests of the Civil Rights Movement to the politics of the 1990s.

PolS 816. Studies in the Legislative Process. (5)

PolS 819. Campaign Organization and Management. (5) A broad introduction to electoral campaign research, organization, and management.

PolS 830. Political Parties and Interest Groups. (5) American political parties and interest groups and the functions they perform in the political system.

*PolS 832. Studies in American Politics. (5)

PolS 833. State Politics. (5) Comparative treatment of institutions, authorities, processes, and policy making in the American states.

PolS 835. Women and Politics. (5) Women's political behavior, women and public policy, and relevant aspects of feminist theory.

PolS 837. Electoral Behavior. (5) Major theories of voting and electoral behavior as they apply to a variety of political offices.

PolS 838. Public Opinion and Political Communication. (5) The development of political attitudes and public opinion; ways in which political communication alters public opinion.

PolS 840. Urban Political Behavior. (5) Relationship between the urban environment and urban politics.

PolS 853. Politics of Aging. (5) Analysis of voting behavior of older Americans, past and present federal and state policies, and their effect on quality of life for the elderly. Emphasis on advocacy roles.

Public Policy and Administration

PolS 711. Aging Policy and Services. (5) (Same as Soc 711.) Overview of aging policy, services, and programs with emphasis on legislation, funding, planning, the aging network, and the long-term care system.

PolS 804. Introduction to Public Administration. (5) Survey that considers the various elements of the public administration literature; the underlying concepts and significant contemporary issues.

PolS 811. Public Law and Public Administration. (5) Analysis of the relationships between the traditional body of administrative law and legal elements in the public administration environment.

PolS 841. Comparative Administrative Systems. (5) (Cross-listed with PAdm 841.) Cross-national study of administrative-organizational patterns as they relate to cultural setting and the larger political system.

PolS 842. Administrative Thought. (5) Development of major issues and concepts of public administration.

PolS 843. Public Organizations: Theory and Behavior. (5) Development and application of findings in the behavioral sciences with particular reference to communication, human relations, and decision making in public organizations.

PolS 844. Public Administration and Policy Making. (5) (Same as PAdm 844.) Policy-making process both within an agency and within the larger context of the total government process.

PolS 845. Public Personnel Administration. (5) Public personnel principles and practices, including selection, appointment, classification, compensation, tenure, promotion, and the role of the personnel officer in government.

PolS 846. Public Budgeting. (5) Practice and problems of modern fiscal management with special emphasis on budgetary procedures and the means of budgetary analysis.

PolS 847. Current Issues in Public Personnel Management. (5) Analysis and evaluation of current personnel issues facing public administrators.

PolS 848. Democracy and Bureaucracy. (5) Relationships between political and administrative institutions in the United States. Public bureaucracy and public administrators in the American regime. Intentions of the Founders, arguments about the appropriate role of bureau~-cracy in a democracy, and the connections between citizen character and public administration.

*PolS 850. Studies in Public Policy. (1-5) Focus on a specific governmental policy: education, science and technology, welfare, and aging.

PolS 852. Program Planning and Evaluation. (5) Planning and evaluation of public programs.

*PolS 855. Seminar in Governmental Administration. (5)

Comparative Government and Politics

PolS 820. Comparative Politics. (5) Analysis of the major political systems of the western and nonwestern world.

PolS 821. Politics of the Middle East and North Africa. (5) Comparative theoretical analysis of selected political systems in the Middle East.

*PolS 822. Studies in Comparative Political Theory. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 820 or 865. Topics may include comparative public policy, regional integration, or the political economy of specific regions of the world.

PolS 823. The Political Economy of Russia and Eastern Europe. (5) Political, economic and social variables explaining change and the current political and economic structures in the region. Theories from international relations, comparative politics, and international political economy.

PolS 824. Latin American Politics. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 820. Comparative theoretical analysis of the politics of Latin American countries. *PolS 825. Comparative Political Systems. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 820. Theoretical analysis of selected political systems and topics in comparative politics.

PolS 826. Political Modernization. (5) Analysis and evaluation of cross-nationally specific institutions and processes in terms of explicit standards and categories of economic and political development.

PolS 827. European Politics. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 820. Comparative theoretical analysis of the politics of major western and central European countries.

Political Theory

*PolS 875. Studies in Western Political Theory. (5)

International Relations and Foreign Policy

PolS 863. United States Foreign Policy. (5) Substance and process of U.S. foreign policy.

*PolS 864. Studies in Foreign Policy. (5) Topics may include theories of foreign policy making, U.S. national security policy, U.S. foreign economic policy, and comparative foreign policy.

PolS 865. International Politics. (5) Concepts and theories in international politics.

*PolS 866. Studies in International Political Economy. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 865. Topics may include theoretical analysis of trade, monetary and financial regimes, and North-South relations.

*PolS 868. Studies in International Relations. (5) Prerequisite: PolS 865. Topics may include international organization and law, human rights, international social movements, nations and nationalism and international conflict resolution.

Special Courses for Advanced Students

*PolS 889. Directed Reading in a Special Area. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

PolS 890. Comprehensive Readings. (5) For students preparing for master's or doctoral examinations. To be taken in the quarter in which the examinations are taken.

*PolS 891. Directed Research in Political Science. (5)

PolS 896. Practicum. (5 or 10) Interchange between government officials, students, and faculty, with visiting lecturers subjecting problems to a variety of techniques, including simulation, gaming, and role playing as methods of solving problems and as methods of teaching.

PolS 897. Administrative/Policy Internship. (5 or 10) Assignment to a staff, high-level administrative, or policy position for pre-service and in-service students pursuing management careers.

PolS 898. Teaching Internship. (5 or 10) Assignment to an undergraduate or graduate course under the supervision of a faculty member. Written assignment is required. For pre-service and in-service students interested in college-level teaching.

PolS 899. Thesis Research. (1-15)
*May be taken more than once if topics are different.


Department of Psychology

Robert D. (Robin) Morris, Chair
R. Barry Ruback, Associate Chair
Fran Norris, Director of Graduate Studies


Degrees offered: Master of Arts Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Psychology offers courses of study leading primarily to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. A Master of Arts degree is completed by students without one as part of their courses of study. The master's level education of graduate students focuses upon basic psychological knowledge and methodologies common to the science and profession of psychology in general. Although students typically begin more specialized coursework at this level, the master's degree is intended as preparation for continued learning in pursuit of the doctoral degree. Doctoral-level study then provides students the opportunity to acquire the additional knowledge and skills necessary for professional careers in teaching, research, clinical service, and consultation.
      The doctoral-level education of advanced graduate students focuses upon more specialized coursework and supervised experiences in the department's four program areas. The program areas are Clinical Psychology, Community Psychology, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurosciences, and Psychological Foundations (with faculty in cognitive, comparative, developmental, and social). The areas of specialization within the program areas are defined by the interests of the faculty, and will change as the interests of the faculty change. This reflects the intent of the faculty that the affairs of the department will be conducted within a scholarly context that encourages diversity, growth, and change.
      The facilities of the department permit work in cognition, development, neuropsychology, learning, infant behavior, sensation and perception, motivation, aging, social psychology, assessment, individual, psychotherapy, group and family therapy, behavior therapy, and community psychology. Students may work with both human and nonhuman populations. Human populations include all age ranges and a variety of ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Nonhuman populations include several species ranging from hamsters to the great apes.
      The graduate program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association. A respecialization program of study in clinical psychology is offered to psychologists who have earned the Doctor of Philosophy degree from the Department of Psychology at an accredited institution.

Policy on Nondegree Admission:

      Students may take no more than ten hours of coursework in nondegree status without petitioning the department for an exception to this policy. Students enrolled in nondegree status in a psychology graduate course may not at the same time be applicants to a degree program and may not apply for admission to a graduate degree program in the department for four quarters following the quarter in which the nondegree course was taken. Applications for nondegree admission may be obtained from the Department of Psychology. Application deadlines for nondegree status are the same as those listed below for the Psychological Foundations Program.

Admission Deadlines for the 1996-97 and 1997-98 Academic Years

Clinical Psychology Program Area:

Applications for the Clinical Psychology program are considered for the fall quarter only. Clinical applicants must meet two deadlines. First, the Application for Graduate Study (the multi-copy form) and the $10 application fee must be postmarked by December 10, 1996 for fall quarter 1997 and by December 9, 1997 for fall quarter 1998. Second, all supporting material (transcripts, scores, letters, and clinical supplemental form) must be postmarked by January 10, 1997 for fall quarter 1997 and January 9, 1998 for fall quarter 1998.

Community Psychology Program Area:

Applications for Community Psychology are accepted for the fall quarter only. The deadline is March 1, 1997, for Fall 1997 and March 1, 1998 for Fall 1998.

Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurosciences Program Area:

Applications for Clinical Neuropsychology are only accepted for fall quarter each year. Applicants must follow the procedures and deadlines for applications to the Clinical Program and must be admitted to both programs. Behavioral Neurosciences accepts students each quarter. Please refer to the quarterly deadline listed below for the Psychological Foundations Program Area. Behavioral Neurosciences applicants seeking financial aid must meet the deadline for Clinical Neuropsychology.

Psychological Foundations Program Area:

Applications for Psychological Foundations are accepted for all quarters. NOTE: The following deadlines apply for Psychological Foundations and nondegree applicants only:

For entrance: The deadline is:

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Psychology has the following requirements:

1.  Applicants are expected to have a background in psychology, although an undergraduate major  is not required. A minimum      of four courses are required: psychological statistics, a course   in research methods in psychology, plus two or more             content courses in psychology on the  junior or senior level. Applicants to the clinical program must take abnormal           psychology  as one of the content courses.
2.  The applicant must submit scores that are well above average on the general test of the  Graduate Record Examination.
3.  Students without a master's degree in psychology are admitted initially for master's work only.  All applicants are evaluated
     relative to departmental criteria for doctoral-level work.  However,admission for doctoral study is made only after the M.A.      degree has been awarded or, in  the case of students who enter the program with a master's degree, after the graduate      director has granted credit for that degree.Upon completion of the master's degree requirements,  acceptance into the           doctoral program by the program committee is required.
4.  A student in possession of a graduate degree or coursework who is admitted to graduate study may be accorded advanced
     standing after an evaluation of previous graduate work. Theevaluation ordinarily will be conducted during the first quarter of      enrollment. If the student's previous graduate work did not include courses equivalent to the required core courses, a thesis,      and a foreign language or research skill, these will be required. Students given full credit for  master's work elsewhere will      have four quarters in which to complete all  work stipulated as  conditions of admission or transfer of credit and to be           accepted for doctoral study by the  program committee.
5. Each student must fill out the Supplementary Form for Graduate Study in Psychology.

Degree Requirements

MASTER OF ARTS

A complete statement of the departmental requirements for the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees may be obtained from the Department of Psychology. General requirements are indicated below. Satisfactory progress through the program is expected in a timely manner, and when students fail to meet progress guidelines set by the department they will be permitted to enroll only for coursework aimed at meeting the requirements until those requirements have been met satisfactorily. Furthermore, there are departmental regulations concerning maintenance of active status, leaves of absence, and reentry into the program. Graduate students must be aware of these regulations. The M.A. degree requires a thesis and fifty hours of coursework as outlined below.

1. Twenty-five hours of core courses.
2. Fifteen additional hours of graduate psychology courses.
3. Fifteen hours of Psy 899, Master's Thesis Research.
4. Proficiency in a foreign language or in an approved equivalent research skill.
5. A general examination.
6. A thesis.
7. A thesis defense.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (90-hour program)

A minimum of 140 postbaccalaureate hours, 90 of which must be taken at Georgia State University, are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Credit for up to 50 hours is possible for students with master's degrees from other institutions with the approval of the departmental Graduate Program Committee and the College of Arts and Sciences Division of Graduate Studies. Upon petition, 10 hours of work may be taken at other institutions. Students meeting particular program area requirements frequently find it necessary to take more than the minimum of 140 hours of credit. The number of credit hours required for clinical students often exceeds two hundred. Additional requirements include:

1. A master's degree based on a written thesis.
2. A minimum of one year's full-time residence.
3. Sixty credit hours of coursework beyond the master's degree.
4. Fifteen hours of Psy 998, Readings for General Examination.
5. Thirty hours of Psy 999, Doctoral Dissertation Research.
6. Satisfaction of the foreign language requirement.
7. A general examination, which consists of both written and oral parts, to be taken after the student  has completed ninety
          hours of coursework.
8. A dissertation.
9. A dissertation defense.
10 Clinical Psychology students: one year of internship at a site approved by the American Psychological Association. (The
          majority of these sites are outside the state of Georgia.)

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Psychology by contacting: Graduate Records Coordinator
Department of Psychology
Georgia State University
University Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 651-2456.


Course Descriptions

NOTE: Course credit hours are shown in parentheses immediately following the course title.

For students not in the graduate program in psychology, consent of the instructor is required for clinical courses.

Psy 613. Sensation and Perception. (5) Experimental analysis of sensory and perceptual processes at both a physiological and a psychophysical level. The five primary sensory systems will be covered; vision, audition, touch, taste and smell.

Psy 631. Psychology of the Criminal and the Delinquent. (5) Psychological contributions to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of criminal and delinquent behavior.

Psy 640. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. (5) Problems of children with mental, physical, or emotional difficulties or limitations, with emphasis upon diagnostic and corrective approaches.

Psy 655. Neurobiology I: Cellular and Systems Neurobiology. (5) (Same as Bio 655.) Prerequisite: Bio 384 or equivalent. The nervous system at the cellular, systems, and organismal level; topics include membrane and cellular physiology, neurotransmission, sensory physiology, neuronal integration, control systems and neuroethology.

Psy 656. Neurobiology II: Growth, Structure and Function of Nervous Systems. (5) (Same as Bio 656.) Prerequisite: Bio 384 or equivalent. Introduction to modern cellular and molecular neurobiology with an emphasis on neuronal structure and development. Topics include the molecular organization of cells, the cytoskeleton, cell signaling, cell growth and division, cell adhesion, cell migration and axonal guidance, control of cell identity, cell biology of synapse formation, neuronal survival and death.

Psy 657. Neurobiology III: Behavioral Neurobiology. (5) (Same as Bio 657.) Prerequisite: Bio 384 or equivalent. Social behavior and communication; topics include reproductive behavior, aggression, and brain-behavior relationships in language and cognition.

Psy 659. Neurobiology IV. (5) (Same as Bio 659.) Five lecture hours a week with trips to the Language Research Center. Prerequisite: Bio 657 or Psy 657. Biobehavioral principles of learning, cognition, and language from the perspective of brain revolution and theory of brain function.

Psy 663. Hormones and Behavior. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 303 or Bio 384. Interaction of nervous and endocrine systems in the control of behavior of mammals, including humans, with emphasis on the mechanisms that adapt behavior to the changing physical and social environment.

*Psy 680. Seminar. (1-5) Students will be given responsibility for preparing and presenting survey reports and summaries concerning recent advances and trends in major areas of psychology.

Psy 761. Psychology of Aging. (5) Pre~-req~-uisite: one of the following Psy 101, 105, 202, 203, 204. Psychological contributions to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of normal and abnormal changes of later life.

Psy 801. Research Methods in Psychology. (5) Types of research design including experimental designs, quasi-experimental designs, single-case designs, and case studies; related research issues including aspects of philosophy of science, measurement, reliability, internal and external validity, and artifacts.

Psy 802. Assessment Sequence I. (5) Introduction to clinical interviewing, report writing, psychometrics, ethnic and cultural issues, IQ testing, and projective tests.

Psy 803. Assessment Sequence II. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 802. Projective tests, behavioral assessment, evaluation of children, mental retardation, and learning disabilities.

Psy 804. Assessment Sequence III. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 803. Advanced assessment techniques, interpretation, and report writing.

Psy 805. Diversity Issues in Clinical Practice and Psychological Research. (5) How diversity (primarily racial and ethnic) affects individual attitudes and actions, clinical practice, and psychological research. Students read from a variety of psychological and other sources, engage in experiential field work, and participate in class discussion and exercises.

Psy 816. Computer-Based Education: Principles and Practice. (5) Design, production, and evaluation of instructional computer programs. Emphasis on understanding the computer as a tool for education and training. Students learn the use of PILOT authoring language in the microcomputer lab to produce instructional programs. No computer background required.

Psy 841. Psychological Statistics II. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 301. Statistical analysis of psychological data.

Psy 842. Psychological Statistics III. (5) Correlation, regression, and special topics.

Psy 843. Single-Case Methodology. (5) Fundamentals of single-case methodology in psychological research; the logic of single-case experimental design; formulation of testable hypotheses, data collection procedures, and interpretation of results within the framework of the functional analysis of behavior.

Psy 844. Observational Methodology. (5) Techniques for systematically observing and recording data in naturalistic settings and for reducing, analyzing, and interpreting such data. Individual research projects may be required.

Psy 845. Psychometric Theory. (5) Measurement theory, internal structure of measures, validity, reliability, test construction, and measurement of sentiments.

Psy 846. Fundamentals of Therapeutic Communication. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and research regarding communication; observation and analysis of communication; ratings of communication effectiveness.

Psy 849. Scientific and Professional Ethics. (5) Introduction to psychology as a science and profession, with consideration of ethical standards of psychologists and current ethical issues.

Psy 850. History and Systems of Psychology. (5) Broad historical basis of psychology as a science. An account of the historical development and contemporary status of various theoretical systems of psychology.

Psy 851. Advanced Social Psychology. (5) Survey of the content of experimental social psychology, including such areas as interpersonal perception, social motivation and learning, attitude and measurement and change, and such group processes as conformity, leadership, norm formation, and group productivity.

Psy 853. Classical and Instrumental Conditioning. (5) Major empirical literature in classical and instrumental (including operant) conditioning. Laboratory work may be required.

Psy 854. Cognitive Psychology. (5) Empirical and theoretical bases for understanding the processes of thought, including attention, pattern recognition, learning, memory, language and reasoning.

Psy 855. Advanced Child Development. (5) Review of current trends and research findings in the field of child behavior and development.

Psy 856. Psychology of Animal Behavior. (5) Psychological basis of animal behavior. Basic adaptive mechanisms and their importance for understanding human behavior.

Psy 859. Organizational Psychology. (5) Application of psychological principles and research methodology to the prediction and understanding of human behavior in work settings.

Psy 860. Introduction to Community Psychology. (5) Principles and theory of community psychology with emphasis on design, operation, and evaluation of community programs.

Psy 861. Behavioral Neuroscience. (5) Five lecture hours a week. Analysis of functional neural systems in the regulation of behavior, emphasizing the analysis of limbic, hypothalamic, and retic~-ular-cortical mechanisms in behavior.

Psy 862. Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology. (3-5) Five lecture hours a week. Prerequisite: Psy 861. Topics include laterality, handedness, cerebral dominance, basic neuroanatomy, aphasia, neglect, amnesic syndromes, agnosia, alexia, split brain research, and recovery of function.

Psy 863. Developmental Neuropsychology. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 862. Development of the central nervous system and brain; their relationship to behavioral development; common CNS disorders in children.

Psy 866. Theories of Personality. (5) Survey of various personologists from Freud to the present emphasizing integration of the historical trends in personology with current theories.

Psy 867. Introduction to the Dynamic Psycho~-therapies. (5) Discussion of major contemporary theories of psychotherapy; tapes, files, lectures, and class discussions.

Psy 868. Personality in Marriage and Family. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 866. Priorities along the life cycle consisting of: selfhood, partnership, parenthood, in-laws, work, friends, and leisure; focus on ability to love and to negotiate.

Psy 869. Introduction to the Behavior Therapies. (5) Basic principles and underlying assumptions of contemporary approaches to behavioral and cognitive-behavioral treatment.

Psy 877. Symbolic and Metaphoric Communication. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 866 and consent of instructor. Development of symbols primarily through the theories of Freud and Jung. Relationship of symbols to myths, "normal" psychopathological behavior; metaphor as an extension of the symbol.

Psy 878. Psychology of the Archetype. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 877 and consent of instructor. Consideration of various archetypes as expressed through myths and dreams. Application to the understanding of oneself and to psychotherapy and psychodiagnosis.

Psy 899. Master's Thesis Research. (1-15)

Psy 902. Applied Multivariate Statistics. (5) (Same as Math 809). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Matrix algebra, multivariate normal distributions, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, and multivariate analysis of variance.

Psy 903. Methods of Program Evaluation in Community Psychology. (5) Management, clinical, values-linked, quasi-experimental design, and benefit-cost analysis approaches to the evaluation of sponsored activities.

Psy 911. Objective Personality and Interest Questionnaires. (5) Five lectures and three laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Survey of various objective questionnaires, including the MMPI, CPI, EPPS, PRF, and others, including their development and use.

Psy 912. Personality Assessment. (5) Five lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: Psy 848, Psy 917, and consent of instructor. Introduction to the use of objective and projective techniques of personality assessment.

Psy 913. Assessment of Symbolic and Cognitive Functions. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 804 and consent of instructor. Interpretation of the Rorschach and other projective techniques.

Psy 914. Neuropsychological Assessment. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 848 and 862. Standardized batteries and additional neuropsychological tests for both standard and bedside testing. Actual test administration included.

Psy 917. Seminar in Behavior Disorders. (5) Critical review of recent research and theory concerning selected behavioral problems in children and adults.

Psy 919. Psychology of Gender Differences. (5) Recent theories of and research on the development of sex differences; maintenance, change, and consequences of these differences in female and male adults.

Psy 921. Applications of Dynamic Psycho~-therapies. (5) Prerequisites: Advanced standing and consent of instructor; Psy 867 for clinical psychology graduate students; students must register for five hours of Psy 995D. Lives and works of the major contributors to the field of psychodynamic psychotherapy; beginning and first-hand involvement in the therapeutic process under supervision.

Psy 922. Psychotherapy II. Schools of Psychotherapy. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 921 and consent of instructor. Student also must register for two hours of Psy 995D. Issues in therapy. Beginning therapeutic work with supervisory groups. Laboratory required.

*Psy 923. Psychotherapy III. Seminars in Advanced Approaches to Psychotherapy. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Student must register for two hours of Psy 995E. Intensive study and training in a major therapeutic approach. Supervision of work with clients.

Psy 927. Family Assessment. (5) Prerequisites: a course in tests and measurements, and consent of instructor. Methods for evaluating interaction and level of functioning in family groups.

Psy 928. Prevention in the Family. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 927. Major preventive approaches with children, couples, parents, and families, with emphasis on interpersonal social skills and structured methods of prevention. Optional laboratory experience in application of course content.

Psy 929. Introduction to the Systemic Psycho~-therapies. (5) Theories of pathological interaction in marital and family systems and strategies of intervention.

Psy 930. Marital Intervention. (5) Theoretical, methodological, and technical approaches to marital interaction and intervention.

Psy 935. Behavioral Disturbances in Children. (5) Evaluation and rehabilitation of adjustment problems in childhood.

Psy 936. Child and Adolescent Assessment. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 848, Psy 935. Methods of assessing children from infancy through adolescence, and interpretation of a variety of tests. Importance of family, peer, school, cultural factors, and normal development.

Psy 937. Applications of Systemic Psycho~-therapies. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 929; student must also register for five hours of Psy 995H. Systems approaches to the treatment of behavior disorders in children through adolescence; theories and tactics of the systems approaches.

Psy 940. Child and Family Behavior Therapy. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 869 or con~-sent of instructor. Theoretical perspectives and applied methodology of behavioral modification for the understanding and treatment of emotional/ behavioral problems from infancy to adolescence.

Psy 942. Applications of the Behavior Therapies. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 869; student must also register for five hours of Psy 995K. Examination of selected applications of behavior therapy including supervision of simulated interventions.

Psy 947. Basic Processes in Group Interaction. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Experiential-didactic study of basic group dynamics with particular emphasis on the therapeutic potential of small groups.

Psy 952. Research Strategies in Social Psychology. (5) Methods of studying social behavior and organization. Emphasis upon qualitative approaches, sources of ideas, observational techniques, unobtrusive measures, and novel methods of analysis. Includes introduction to evaluation research.

Psy 966. Infancy. (5) Prerequisite: Psy 855. Sensory, motor, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development during the first two years of life.

Psy 968. Language and Thought Development. (5) Four lectures and one laboratory hour a week. Prerequisite: Psy 855 or equivalent. Developmental approach to symbolization, the Vygotsky-Piaget controversy, and related topics.

Psy 971. Seminar in Leadership. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 859, Mgt 820, Mgt 845, Mgt 940 or consent of instructor. Study and evaluation of the current research literature in various aspects of leadership, including personality and interpersonal style, leader-follower interaction, situational aspects, and leadership training.

Psy 972. Consultation and Conflict Management. (5) Prerequisites: Psy 859, Mgt 820, Mgt 845, Mgt 940 or consent of instructor. Consulting in human resources problems in various organizations, with focus on the constructive use and management of conflict and agreement. Entry, contracting, assessment, intervention and evaluation will be considered, using a conflict consultation model as a general model.

Psy 976. Personnel Psychology. (5) Application of psychological principles and methods to the problems of employee selection, training, and evaluation.

*Psy 990. Seminar in Psychology. (1-5) Topics presented by special request.

*Psy 991. Advanced Directed Readings. (1-5) Directed readings in special areas.

*Psy 992. Advanced Research in Psychology. (1-5) Directed research studies.

*Psy 993. Clinical Psychology Laboratory. (1-5) Prerequisitie: consent of instructor. Demonstrations, videotaped depictions, and/or simulated practice of clinical assessment and intervention procedures and applications.
      A. Dynamic Psychotherapy
      B. Behavior and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy
      C. Systemic Psychotherapy D. Fundamental Clinical Skills

*Psy 994. Specialized Seminar. (1-5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Presentations by faculty and outside speakers designed to familiarize the students with the variety of professional activities practiced in the areas listed below:
      A. Developmental/Comparative
      B. Community/Organizational
      C. Social Psychology
      D. Psychotherapy
      E. Child Clinical
      F. Behavior Therapy
      G. Family Studies
      H. Physiological
      I. General Clinical

*Psy 995. Practicum. (1-5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
      A. Teaching (introductory)
      B. Teaching (advanced)
      C. Assessment
      D. Psychotherapy (introductory)
      E. Psychotherapy (advanced)
      F. Awareness Groups
      G. Group Interaction
      H. Family Work
      I. Child Clinical
      J. Community Intervention
      K. Behavior Therapy
      M. Specialized Skills
      N. Neuropsychology Assessment
      P. Health Psychology

Psy 998. Readings for General Examination. (5) Intensive reading on a highly specific topic in preparation for the general examination.

Psy 999. Doctoral Dissertation Research. (1-15)
*May be taken more than once if topics are different.


Department of Sociology


Ralph LaRossa, Chair
Phillip W. Davis, Director of Graduate Studies


Degrees offered: Master of Arts Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Sociology offers M.A. and Ph.D students a program that provides broad exposure to the discipline of sociology; in addition, the program encourages students to develop a special area of expertise. Broad knowledge of sociology comes through coursework in a variety of substantive areas, as well as from training in research methodology, statistics, and theory. Most of our faculty's interest and expertise lie in two broad areas: family and the life course, and social conflict and inequality . The department has an applied orientation and stresses a close working relationship between faculty and graduate students. The Department of Sociology has established a Program for the Study of Social and Cultural Change to support research, seminars, and colloquia on a different topic each year. It brings faculty and students' work on social change themes to a wider audience and draws outside agencies into collaborative efforts with us.
      Thus, the goal of the department is to provide graduate students with three things. First, a general intellectual framework that gives them a better analytic understanding of social life. Second, a sound methodological background so they may actively engage in social research and policy evaluation. Third, a rich and more specialized body of information, theory, and research methods drawn from an important subarea of sociology. We offer students many opportunities to become actively involved in the discipline at the state, regional, or national levels, help them develop competence in teaching sociology, and encourage them to put their sociological skills to use in public or community settings.
      The master's degree (M.A.) program prepares students for positions in research, middle-level management, community service, or continued education toward a doctoral degree. The Ph.D. program prepares students for careers in teaching, research, community service, or management.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Sociology has the following requirements:

1. Students applying to the Master of Arts program:
   a. Must submit acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examination.
   b. Although an undergraduate major in sociology is not required, applicants must have taken   undergraduate courses in
          research methodology and social statistics. Applicants seeking  the Master of Arts degree who do not have these           courses should take them at another school or apply for and take them in postbaccalaureate status at Georgia State           University.
   c. Each applicant must complete the supplementary application form  provided by the Department  of Sociology.
2. Students applying to the Doctor of Philosophy program:
    a. Must submit acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the  Graduate Record Examination.
    b. Although a master's degree in sociology is not required, only students who have an accredited  master's degree, or are
          close to receiving one, will be considered for the Ph.D. program (an M.A.degree is required to actually enter the Ph.D.           program).  Applicants must have taken  undergraduate courses in research methodology and social statistics, and if they           have not had   master's-level coursework in methodology, statistics, and logical theory, then they must take  them as           additional courses prior to taking Ph.D. courses in these areas.
    c. Each applicant must complete the supplementary application form  provided by the Department  of Sociology.
   d. Each applicant must submit three letters of recommendation from faculty personally acquainted  with the applicant's
          achievements.
   e. Each applicant should submit a sample of their written scholarly work (e.g., their Master's thesis  or a term paper).

Degree Requirements

MASTER OF ARTS

Thesis option (50-hour program) Non-thesis option (55-hour program)

1. Fifteen or twenty hours of required coursework: Soc 800. Proseminar in Sociology (required for students who did not major      in sociology) Soc 801. Intermediate Sociological Statistics Soc 802.   Research Methodology Soc 810. Classical          Sociological Theory
2a. Thesis option:
      a. Twenty or twenty-five hours of elective coursework. With the approval of the director of   graduate studies in the
              Department of Sociology, up to ten of these hours may be in fields  other than sociology, provided they are relevant               to the student's academic program. No more than ten hours of Soc 897, Directed Reading, are permitted.
      b. Ten hours of Soc 899, Thesis Research.
      c. A thesis.
      d. A thesis defense.
2b. Non-thesis option:
      a. Thirty or thirty-five hours of elective coursework. With the approval of the director of  graduate studies in the
          Department of Sociology, up to ten of these hours may be in fieldsother than sociology, provided they are relevant to the           student's academic program. No more  than ten hours of Soc 897, Directed Reading, are permitted.
       b. Five hours of Soc 894, Directed Project.
       c. A high-quality, article-length paper.

           NOTE: In both the thesis and non-thesis options, up to ten hours may be transferred by   petition  from other accredited
          institutions. Students must maintain a cumulative grade-point average of "B" or better, and students who receive a grade           of "C," "F," or "U" in two courses will be recommended for dismissal from the graduate program.

3. Proficiency in one foreign language or in an approved alternative research skill (contact the department for details).
4. A written general examination.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (95-hour program beyond the master's degree)

1. Ninety-five credit hours beyond the master's degree, consisting of:
      a. Fifteen hours of required coursework: Soc 864. Advanced Research Methodology Soc 870. Contemporary
               Sociological Theories Soc 890. Special Topics in Sociology (Multivariate Data  Analysis) NOTE: The prerequisite for           Soc 864 is Soc 802, the prerequisite for Soc 870 is Soc  810, and the prerequisite for Soc 890 is Soc 801. If a student           has not had a prerequisite (or its equivalent) in his or her MA program, then the needed prerequisite course must be             taken first, and the credit hours for it will not count toward the doctoral degree. Students who do not have an M.A.               degree in sociology must take Soc 800, and the credit hours for it will  not count toward the doctoral degree.
      b. Forty-five hours of elective coursework. With the approval of the director of graduate studies in the Department of
              Sociology, up to ten of these hours may be in fields other than sociology,  provided they are relevant to the student's             academic program. At least thirty-five of the elective hours must be in regularly scheduled courses, with up to ten hours         in  Soc 897, Directed Reading.
      c. Five hours of Soc 998, Doctoral Practicum, to fulfill a teaching or research apprenticeship.
      d. Thirty hours of Soc 999, Dissertation Research.

      NOTE: At least seventy-five of the hours listed above must be taken at Georgia State  University. Students with post-MA            degree coursework from other accredited institutions  may  petition to transfer up to twenty hours. Students must                maintain a cumulative grade-pointaverage of "B" or better, and students who receive a grade of "C," "F," or "U" in two            courses will be recommended for dismissal from the graduate program.
2. Satisfaction of the foreign language requirement (Contact the department for details).
3. A multi-part, written examination, which must be taken after the student has completed the required doctoral courses.
4. A dissertation.
5. An oral examination that includes a dissertation defense.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Sociology by contacting the: Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Sociology
Georgia State University
University Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 651-2285.


Course Descriptions

NOTE: Course credit hours are shown in parentheses immediately following the course title.

All courses have as prerequisite that the student be accepted for graduate study in sociology or have the consent of the instructor.

Soc 610. Black Women in the United States. (5) Contemporary social issues of black women. Emphasis on the historical roots of current issues and the interrelationships of gender, race, and class.

Soc 613. Social Inequality. (5) Analysis of major theories of social stratification and empirical research dealing with power relations and the structure of class, caste, and status systems; examines conflict and mobility among classes as well as conceptual and methodological issues in stratification.

Soc 660. Law and Society. (5) Recruitment, training, and practice in the legal professions. Analysis of the legal system as a process.

Soc 679. Urban Atlanta. (5) (Same as Geog 679 and Hist 679.) Interdisciplinary perspective which focuses on social, historical, and geographic processes which influence Atlanta.

Soc 690. Selected Topics in Sociology. (5)

Soc 711. Aging Policy and Services. (5) (Same as PolS 711.) Overview of aging policy, services, and programs with emphasis on legislation, funding, planning, the aging network, and the long-term care system.

Soc 800. Proseminar in Sociology. (5) Introduction to central concepts, methods, and professional practices in sociology; development of basic skills used in theoretical and empirical work; and orientation to the discipline and this department of sociology.

Soc 801. Intermediate Sociological Statistics. (5) Prerequisite: Soc 320 or its equivalent, and consent of instructor. Parametric and nonparametric statistical topics pertinent to sociological research.

Soc 802. Research Methodology. (5) Prerequisite: Soc 801 or consent of instructor. Problem formulation, the logic of research design, scale construction, operational and measurement techniques, and forms of tabular presentation employed in the social survey.

*Soc 803. Population Dynamics. (5) Investigation of migration patterns, trends in birth and death rates, population composition (e.g., age, sex, occupational, ethnic), and spatial patterns of human social groups and activities; policy issues (e.g., overpopulation, immigration), practical applications of demographic anal~-ysis, and basic demographic measures and techniques; interrelations among social behavior, technological development, and environmental change.

Soc 804. Personality and Social Systems. (5) Effects of the interactions of social, structural, cultural, and personality variables on individual and social behavior.

Soc 806. Sociology of Mental Health. (5) Social processes in the development, definition, and resoluton of disturbed behavior.

Soc 808. Seminar on American Marriage and the Family. (5) Structural changes in mate selection, marriage and the family since the turn of the century; the impact of technology, urbanization, and industrialization on male/female interaction prior to marriage and within the family constellation.

Soc 809. Sociology of Education. (5) Sociological approach to the study of education as an institution in urban settings.

Soc 810. Classical Sociological Theory. (5) Critical examination of major theoretical and methodological orientations in American sociology.

Soc 811. Sociology of Occupations. (5) Social relationships in such areas as recruitment, stratification, training, career patterns, client-colleague relations, mobility, social control, job satisfaction.

Soc 812. Seminar in Race Relations. (5) Cross-cultural analysis of dominant/ subordinate relations; special attention devoted to similarity of structural arrangements between dominant/subordinate groups in the United States compared with those existing in other societies.

Soc 813. Seminar in Complex Organizations. (5) Goals, internal structure and environmental relations of complex organization such as governmental bureaucracies, corporations, trade unions, and universities; modern society as an interactional structure of complex organizations.

Soc 815. Seminar in Sociology of Religion. (5) Social dimensions of religion, the relationship between religion and society, sociological theories of religion, religious organization and behavior, religion and social change, secularization and the future of religion.

Soc 816. Sociology of Gender. (5) Critical examination of gender socialization and gender stratification in contemporary society.

Soc 818. Seminar in Political Sociology. (5) Utilizes concepts, methods, and strategic approaches of sociology to study the nature and function of power and authority within societal systems; emphasis on a nonnormative strategy based on sociological research methods, statistical analysis, and formal models.

Soc 819. Seminar in Social Movements. (5) Social movement as a collectivity acting with some continuity to promote or resist change; the relationship of social movements to social, political, and economic environments; organization and structure of movements.

Soc 820. Seminar in Deviance and Social Control. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Theory and research regarding behavior which violates well-established social norms; social factors which engender such behavior and social reactions to such behavior; examples of typical interests would be sexually deviant behavior, certain types of mental illness, alcoholism, and suicide.

*Soc 822. Introduction to Gerontology. (5) Theoretical and descriptive information concerning the biology, psychology, and sociology of aging; social gerontology as a field of study.

Soc 823. Seminar in Social Gerontology. (5) Societal bases of aging; problems unique to the aged, and the social roles, activities, and statuses of older people; topics include retirement, economics, political involvement, family roles, and religious and leisure activity.

Soc 824. Seminar in Adult Socialization. (5) Analysis of changes, adjustments, and conflicts throughout the adult life cycle, focusing on becoming an adult, education, marriage, parenthood, work and occupational careers, retirement, institutional care, old age, and death as personal and social experiences.

Soc 825. Sociology of Aging and Health. (5) Individual experience of physical aging, disease, and death in old age; patterns and social cause of physical and mental illness, mortality, and longevity; illness behavior of older people, including health care utilization, compliance, patient-practitioner interaction, and health promotion behavior.

Soc 826. Family Studies. (5) Review of research strategies and conceptual frameworks utilized in the investigation of marriage and family systems.

Soc 827. Comparative Marriage and Family Systems. (5) Analysis of marriage and family systems in different countries and in different racial and ethnic groups. Emphasis on modern societies and societies undergoing modernization.

Soc 829. Seminar on Sociology of Death and Dying. (5) Research and theoretical perspectives on the social structure and social process of death and dying.

Soc 833. Seminar in Aging and Long-Term Care. (5) Sociological analysis of the long-term health care system. Emphasis on care of the elderly and on client, practitioner, and therapeutic issues in institutional and community-based settings.

Soc 835. Contemporary Trends in Urban Research. (5) Recent developments in urban sociological research and theory.

Soc 836. Urban Community Organization and Development. (5) Social and political structure of urban, suburban, and neighborhood community life; utilization of both classical and contemporary community studies.

Soc 837. Seminar in Urban Sociology. (5) Urbanism from a sociological point of view. Focuses on three basic areas: theoretical concepts and perspectives on urban social organization; current sociological perspectives on the city; and contemporary applications of these perspectives.

Soc 838. Seminar on Community and Social Planning. (5) Social planning in the context of the local community. Emphasis on planning, programming, and evaluation of human services, inter- and intra-agency cooperation and conflict, and the sociopolitical context of social policy and of service provision.

Soc 840. Seminar in the Sociology of Drugs. (5) Major areas of sociological concern in drug abuse and addiction including legislation, epidemiology, etiology, treatment and rehabilitation and research and evaluation; examples of types of drugs covered would be narcotics, marijuana, psychedelics, sedatives and tranquilizers, and alcohol.

Soc 841. Seminar in the Social Psychology of Drugs. (5) Various means to altered states of consciousness such as meditation and hypnosis with special attention to the psychedelic drugs; various uses and implications of psychedelic drugs.

Soc 842. Medical Sociology. (5) Health and illness beliefs and behavior; social epidemology; sociology of nursing, medicine and other health professions; the social organization and financing of health care; health policy issues.

Soc 843. Seminar in the Sociology of Criminal Justice Organizations. (5) Social forces which shape and influence formal criminal justice organizations; emphasis on the social organizational aspects of police agencies, courts, and correctional institutions.

Soc 844. Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency. (5) Theoretical issues in the study of delinquency; the social context of juvenile behaviors classified as delinquent; trends in the empirical examination of delinquency and the police, juvenile courts, and juvenile corrections.

Soc 845. Advanced Studies in Criminological Theory. (5) Critical issues in criminological theory, covering the major theoretical perspectives; attention to conflict theories and radical thinking in criminology.

Soc 846. Seminar in Criminology. (5) Issues in criminological theory and research, encompassing law and social control, the structure and process of the criminal justice system, epidemiology of crime, history of criminological thought, and criminal careers and behavior systems.

Soc 847. Poverty and Wealth. (5) Critical issues in the generation and maintenance of economic inequalities, both domestically and globally. Emphasis on the role of socioeconomic forces in the production of poverty and wealth as well as individual and group attitudes and behaviors.

Soc 848. Sociology of Oppression and Liberation. (5) Critical examination of material and ideological/cultural dimensions of oppression and liberation, especially with regard to racism, sexism, and colonialism/imperial~-ism.

Soc 850. Family Violence. (5) Social causes of violence in the family, with special attention to the physical abuse of women, children, and the elderly.

Soc 851. Birth and Parenthood. (5) Sociological aspects of pregnancy, birth, and parenting; fatherhood and motherhood in a social and historical context.

Soc 855. Industrial Sociology. (5) Systematic study of the organizational forms of industrial production in relation to society, community, and the individual.

Soc 862. Qualitative Methods in Sociology. (5) Prerequisite: Soc 802 or consent of instructor. Methodological strategies in sociological research involving participant observation, in-depth interviewing, and the use of public and private documents. Special attention given to the analysis of text data (in contrast to numerical data) and the writing of text-based dissertations, articles, and books.

Soc 864. Advanced Research Methodology. (5) Prerequisite: Soc 802 or consent of instructor. Intensive examination of design, sampling, and measurement problems in social research.

Soc 870. Contemporary Sociological Theo~-ries. (5) Prerequisite: Soc 810 or consent of instructor. Recent developments in sociological theory; emphasis on contributions since the dominance of functionalism.

*Soc 890. Special Topics in Sociology. (5)

*Soc 891. Gerontology Internship. (1-10) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Supervised practical training in an aging-related agency, organization, or program.

Soc 892. Applied Project in Gerontology. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Supervised project requiring application of gerontological knowledge to an aging issue or problem.

Soc 894. Directed Project. (1-10) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Supervised research and writing of a high-quality, article-length paper, or preparation of Ph.D. proposal. Credit hours do not count toward the degree for Ph.D. students.

*Soc 897. Directed Reading. (1-5) Directed readings in special areas.

*Soc 898. Sociology Internship. (1-5) Ten credit hours maximum. Applied sociological work in a program, agency or organization.

Soc 899. Thesis Research. (1-15)

Soc 998. Doctoral Practicum. (5) Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Apprenticeship in research or teaching under faculty supervision.

Soc 999. Dissertation Research. (1-15)
*May be taken more than once if topics are different.


Women's Studies Institute

Diane L. Fowlkes, Director


Degree offered: Master of Arts

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree program prepares students for doctoral work in women's studies or in a related discipline or enhances careers in which students increasingly address issues related to the conditions of women's lives.

Additional Admission Requirements

1. Two letters of recommendation addressing the ability of the student to undertake graduate study. 2. A statement of educational and/or career goals.
3. Students are admitted to the program once a year (to begin in fall quarter). Applicants seeking     graduate assistantships must submit all application materials to the Office of Graduate Studies,     College of Arts and Sciences by February 1, and decisions will be made by March 15. All     others must submit materials to the Office of Graduate Studies of the College of Arts and       Sciences by the general deadline date for fall quarter.

Degree Requirements

MASTER OF ARTS (50-hour program)

1. Forty hours of graduate coursework, twenty hours of which are required (WSt 801, WSt 802, WSt 803, and WSt 804         taken in sequence) and twenty hours of which may be taken from the  institute or from a list of approved courses in other       departments.
2. Proficiency in a foreign language or in an approved alternative research skill.
3. A written comprehensive examination taken after completion of 40 hours of coursework.
4. Ten hours of WSt 899 Thesis Research, a thesis prospectus approved by a director and a second  reader, and a thesis.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Women's Studies Institute by contacting the: Director, Women's Studies Institute
Georgia State University
University Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 651-4633.
wsidlf@gsusgi2.gsu.edu


Course Descriptions

NOTE: Course credit hours are shown in parentheses immediately following the course title.

WSt 638. Philosophy of Law: Contemporary Issues. (5) (Same as Phil 673.) Examination of recent debates in the philosophy of law, such as slavery law, critical legal studies, and legal responsibility, with emphasis on feminist legal theory.

WSt 801. Scope and Methods of Women's Studies. (5) Women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of study and as an emerging discipline; theoretical, methodological, epistemological, and ethical issues in feminist scholarship.

WSt 802. Global Feminisms I: Interrogating "Western" Feminisms. (5) Critical examination of the emergence of "Western" feminist movements and systems of thought in the context of pre-colonial and colonial developments that forged relationships between Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Key issues include, among others, women's agency, women in slavery, woman suffrage, and women's rights.

WSt 803. Global Feminisms II: Interrogating "Third World" Feminisms. (5) Critical examination of the emergence of "Third World" feminist movements and systems of thought in the context of pre-colonial and colonial developments that forged relationships between Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Key issues include, among others, the social and cultural heterogeneity of "woman," the gendered/racial politics of colonialism, nationalism, and fundamentalism, and the relationship between feminism and postcoloniality.

WSt 804. New Directions in Women's Studies. (5) New theoretical perspectives and emerging feminist issues in women's studies.

WSt 875. Seminar in Feminist Thought. (5) Critical examination of life and work of selected writer(s), such as Simone de Beauvoir, Anna Julia Cooper, Lillian Smith, bell hooks, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Judith Butler, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde.

*WSt 892. Special Topics in Women's Studies. (5) Critical analysis of a selected topic in women's studies, such as violence against women, global women's movement, comparable worth, women's health, women's spirituality.

WSt 893. Directed Readings. (1-5) Directed readings on special topics.

WSt 899. Thesis Research. (1-15)
*May be repeated if topic varies.