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Program Requirements


| HP Master's Program | HP Master's Program: Audit Template (.xlsx) |
| Public History Master's Program | Public History Master's Program: Audit Template (.xlsx) |
| Certificate Program |

Master of Heritage Preservation - Historic Preservation Track (42-hour program)

The curriculum for the Master's Program in Heritage Preservation requires that students gain a breadth of knowledge in American urban and architectural history, folklore and, in practical historic preservation courses, such as preservation law, conservation of historical building materials, planning, and surveying of historic resources. The program also recognizes that MHP students bring a range of career interests to the program. Therefore, ample opportunities exist to develop each student's unique talents through a variety of electives, individual readings, and research courses.

Students must pass a general oral examination and complete forty-two hours of graduate course work distributed among the following four areas:

Cultural Resources (12 hours)

To gain an overview of the field of heritage preservation, students must take four courses (twelve hours). Students with undergraduate or graduate backgrounds in one of these disciplines may be exempted by the program director from one or more courses in Area 1.

  • FOLK 6020, 6100, 6110, 8220
  • HIST 8600: Introduction to Historic Preservation
  • HIST 8620: Conservation of Historic Building Materials
  • HIST 8635: U.S. Cities
  • HIST 8690: American Architectural History

Buildings and Environment (15 hours)

In order to understand the preservation of building interiors, legal, cultural and landscaped environments students will take courses in preservation law, interior design, and landscape architecture as well as courses in preservation planning and public archaeology. Students should select five of the courses below for fifteen hours.

  • ANTH 8240: Public Archaeology
  • HIST 8610: Preservation Law
  • HIST 8630: American Built Environment
  • HIST 8640: Preservation Planning
  • HIST 8645: Historic Resources Evaluation
  • HIST 8650: Historic American Landscapes and Gardens
  • ID 8650: History of Interior Design

Electives (a minimum of 9 hours)

In order to tailor their programs to such career interests as neighborhood revitalization, preservation administration, research and analysis, restoration finance, or architectural evaluation, students will select appropriate courses from the preservation disciplines represented in the program. Courses may be taken from one or several disciplines and will be selected with the approval of the program director. Below is a list of possible options:

  • ANTH 6200: Urban Anthropology
  • ANTH 6480: Ethnographic Analysis
  • ANTH 6590: Archeological Methods
  • GEOG 6532: Introduction to GIS
  • GEOG 6644: Environmental Conservation
  • GEOG 6760: Cultural Geography
  • GEOG 6774: Contemporary Urban Theory and Issues
  • GEOG 8025: Cultural Geography of the United States
  • HADM 8500: Economic and Cultural Impact of Travel and Tourism
  • HIST 6320: Metropolitan Atlanta
  • HIST 6920: Oral History
  • HIST 6940: Administration and Use of Historical Archives
  • HIST 7040: Issues and Interpretation in Public History
  • HIST 8020: Seminar in US History in 19th Century
  • HIST 8030: Seminar in US History in 20th Century
  • HIST 8050: Southern Cities
  • HIST 8060: History of the South
  • HIST 8070: Seminar in African-American History
  • HIST 8655: The American Suburb
  • HIST 8660: Case Studies in International Preservation
  • HIST 8720: Museum Studies
  • HIST 8730: Exhibit Planning and Production
  • HIST 8740: Material Culture
  • HIST 8840: Seminar in Urban History
  • HIST 8890: Special Topics (Georgia History)
  • HIST 8890: Special Topics (Cultural Landscape Preservation)
  • HIST 8900: Directed Readings
  • PMAP 8021: Urban Policy Planning
  • PMAP 8211: Nonprofit Management
  • PMAP 8221: Fundraising for Voluntary Nonprofit Organizations
  • PMAP 8231: Nonprofit Leadership
  • PMAP 8241: Marketing in the Nonprofit Sector

Applied Studies (6-9 hours)

In order to gain experience in the practical work of heritage preservation, students will take courses that require research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of preservation organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director. A Master’s thesis may be sustituted for the internship requirement.

  • HIST 8680: Internship (3-6 hours)
  • HIST 8700: Case Studies in Historic Preservation

Master of Heritage Preservation - Public History Track (42-hour program)

Historical Foundations (select 5 courses)

To gain an overview of the field of public history, students must take five of these courses:

  • HIST 6920: Oral History
  • HIST 7000: Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory
  • HIST 7010: Issues and Interpretations in American History
  • HIST 7040: Issues and Interpretations in Public History
  • HIST 8050: Southern Cities
  • HIST 8060: Seminar in the History of the South
  • HIST 8635: U.S. Cities
  • HIST 8890: Special Topics (Georgia History)

Professional Concentrations (select 5 courses)

In order to understand the diverse options in the field of history, students will take courses in folk studies, archives, preservation, and museum operations. Students should select five of the courses below:

  • FOLK 6020, 6100, 6110, 8200
  • HIST 6940: Administration and Use of Historical Archives
  • HIST 8600: Introduction to Historic Preservation
  • HIST 8640: Preservation Planning
  • HIST 8700: Case Studies in Historic Preservation
  • HIST 8720: Museum Studies
  • HIST 8730: Exhibit Planning and Production
  • HIST 8740: Material Culture
  • PMAP 8211: Non-profit Management

Electives (2 courses)

In order to tailor their program to career interests, students will select appropriate courses from preservation and public history disciplines represented in the program. Other graduate courses in history or other fields such as documentary film, may be substituted at the discretion of the program director.

  • ANTH 6480: Ethnographic Analysis
  • ANTH 8240: Public Archeology
  • GEOG 6532: Introduction to GIS
  • GEOG 6644: Environmental Conservation
  • GEOG 6760: Cultural Geography
  • GEOG 8025: Cultural Geography of the United States
  • HIST 6320: Metropolitan Atlanta
  • HIST 8020: Seminar in US History in 19th Century
  • HIST 8030: Seminar in US History in 20th Century
  • HIST 8070: Seminar in African-American History
  • HIST 8610: Preservation Law
  • HIST 8620: Conservation of Historic Building Materials
  • HIST 8630: American Built Environment
  • HIST 8645: Historic Resources Evaluation
  • HIST 8650: Historic Landscapes and Gardens
  • HIST 8655: The American Suburb
  • HIST 8660: Case Studies in International Preservation
  • HIST 8840: Seminar in Urban History
  • HIST 8890: Special Topics (Cultural Landscape Preservation)
  • HIST 8900: Directed Readings
  • ID 8650: History of Interior Design I
  • PMAP 8221: Fundraising for Voluntary Nonprofit Organizations
  • PMAP 8231: Nonprofit Leadership/Government Ethics
  • PMAP 8241: Nonprofit Marketing and Communications

Capstone Courses (2 courses)

In order to gain experience in the practical work of public history, students will take courses that require research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of public history organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director.

  • HIST 8680: Internship
  • HIST 8800: Case Studies in Public History

Certificate Program in Heritage Preservation (18-hour program)

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a certificate in heritage preservation, with an emphasis either in historic preservation or in public history. The certificate program is open to students who are enrolled in graduate degree programs and in good academic standing at Georgia State University in such programs as history, anthropology, geography, urban studies, public administration, and real estate. Others may apply for the certificate program using the same procedure as that used to apply for the MHP degree, and the same standards will apply. Students accepted into the certificate program will have student standing, with all the attendant responsibilities and privileges.

The certificate in heritage preservation requires completion of 18 hours of course work, to be taken in two or more departments, and successful completion of a general examination. Students must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average in order to receive a certificate. While graduate credit from other institutions may, by petition, be applied toward the certificate, normally not more than six hours will be accepted.

Students must pass a general written examination for both the certificate in historic preservation and for the certificate in public history.

Certificate in Heritage Preservation (emphasis in Historic Preservation)

The required course work is divided into the three following areas; students must take two courses from each area:

1. Preservation Overview. Students must take both courses.

  • HIST 8600: Introduction to Historic Preservation
  • HIST 8700: Case Studies in Historic Preservation

2. Cultural Resources. Students must choose two courses.

  • ANTH 8240: Public Archaeology
  • HIST 8690: American Architectural History
  • FOLK 8200: Folklore
  • GEOG 8025: Seminar in Cultural Geography of the U.S.
  • HIST 8635: U.S. Cities
  • HIST 8645: Historic Resource Evaluation

3. Preservation Specialties. Students may choose two of the following courses, or others approved by the director of the program.

  • HIST 8050: Southern Cities
  • HIST 6320: Metropolitan Atlanta
  • HIST 8610: Preservation Law
  • HIST 8620: Conservation of Historic Building Materials
  • HIST 8650: Historic American Landscapes and Gardens
  • HIST 8660: Case Studies in International Preservation
  • HIST 8640: Preservation Planning

Certificate in Heritage Preservation (emphasis in Public History)

The required course work is divided into the three following areas; students must take two courses from each area:

1. Public History Overview. Students must take both courses.

  • HIST 7040: Issues and Interpretations in Public History
  • HIST 8800: Directed Studies in Public History

2. Historical Foundations. Students must choose two courses.

  • HIST 6920: Oral History
  • HIST 6940: Administration and Use of Historical Archives
  • HIST 8000: Introduction to Historical Research
  • HIST 8060: Seminar in History of the South
  • HIST 8635: U.S. Cities

3. Public History Specialties. Students may choose two of the following courses, or others approved by the director of the
program.

  • FOLK 6020: American Folk Crafts
  • HIST 6940: Administration and Use of Historical Archives
  • HIST 8640: Preservation Planning
  • HIST 8700: Case Studies in Historic Preservation
  • HIST 8720: Museum Studies
  • HIST 8730: Exhibit Planning and Production
  • HIST 8650: Historic Landscapes and Gardens
  • HIST 8690: American Architectural History
  • PMAP 8211: Administration of Nonprofits


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