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Course Descriptions

 

HISTORY GRADUATE COURSES

HIST 6320 METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

(Same as Geog 6768 and Soci 6279.) Interdisciplinary perspective focusing on social, historical, and geographic processes which have shaped the Atlanta region.

HIST 6885 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HERITAGE PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0 to 4.0

Analysis of selected topics in public history or historic preservation such as cultural resource management, historic site management, museum management or curatorical studies. May be repeated if topics differ.

HIST 6920 ORAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Comprehensive introduction to oral history, its evolution, methodological and theoretical concerns, interviewing techniques, and applications.

HIST 6940 ADMINISTRATION & USE OF HISTORICAL ARCHIVES
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Creation, preservation, and use of historical records which includes the study of archival principles and techniques; practical experience in the University and local, Federal, and State archival depositories.

HIST 7000 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHODS & THEORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

A general introduction to the theoretical and analytical frameworks used by historians, which can include but is not limited to Marxist, gender, anthropological, sociological, cultural, linguistic, and post colonial interpretative methods. Required of all candidates for graduate degrees in history, to be taken in the first year of residence if possible. A grade of B or higher is required of all M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.

HIST 7010 ISSUES & INTERPRETATIONS IN AMERICAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Study and discussion of important historical questions; introduction to the historiography of the field.

HIST 7020 ISSUES & INTERPRETATIONS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Study and discussion of important historical questions; introduction to the historiography of the field.

HIST 7030 ISSUES & INTERPRETATIONS IN WORLD HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Study and discussion of important historical questions; introduction to the historiography of the field.

HIST 7040 ISSUES & INTERPRETATION IN PUBLIC HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

An introduction to key theoretical, methodological, and practical issues addressed by historians who bring history to a wider public beyond the university. Issues include questions of audience and authority in presenting history; the relationship between history and memory; the politics and ethics of public history; and the applications of history in diverse formats and media. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who might consider work in the varied fields of public history.

HIST 7045 INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDIES
Credit Hour(s): 1.0

A general introduction to the professional practices in the history discipline, designed for graduate students who are not pursuing careers in teaching. Required of all candidates for graduate degrees in history, except those who complete HIST 7050. Recommended to be taken in the first year of residence if possible. A grade of S is required of all M.A. and Ph.D. candidates.

HIST 7050 INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDIES & PEDAGOGY IN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

A general introduction to the professional practices and pedagogical issues in the history discipline. Required for all candidates for graduate degrees in history, except those who are approved to take HIST 7045 instead. All GTAs must take Hist 7050. Recommended to be taken in the first year of residence if possible.

HIST 7060 RESEARCH SEMINAR
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

A general introduction to the professional skills and practices involved in undertaking original research aton the thesis or dissertation level. Assignments include a draft MA thesis or dissertation proposal, a series of presentations, and a substantial paper based on original research. Required of all candidates for graduate degrees in history except MA non-thesis track, to be taken in the last year of course work and with the primary adviser's prior approval, if possible. A grade of B or higher is required of all MA thesis track and PhD candidates.

HIST 8010 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN COLONIAL & REVOLUTIONARY HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8020 SEMINAR IN US HISTORY IN 19TH CENTURY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8025 U.S. IN THE GILDED AGE/PROGRESSIVE ERA
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

This graduate seminar engages scholarship about the social, cultural, political and economic history of the United States during the years between Reconstruction and the economic crash of 1929. We will cover a range of topics, including race and ethnicity, class and economic ideolgies, gender, domestic politics, foreign policy, and regional difference. We will also read and discuss a selection of important primary sources from this period.

HIST 8030 SEMINAR IN US HISTORY IN 20TH CENTURY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8035 US LEGAL & CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Seminar in the historiography and evidentiary materials of United States Legal and Constitutional History. Examines the multiple legalities of colonial America, the debate about the origins and meanings of the Constitution, the law of slavery, and the development of both public and private law through the twentieth century. Intellectual topics will also include metahistorical accounts of law and constitution, as well as theories of jurisprudence and their relation to the lived experience.

HIST 8040 SEMINAR: US CULTURAL & INTELLECTUAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8050 SOUTHERN CITIES
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Patterns of urban development in the South with emphasis on the growth of three or four cities. Field trips to such cities as Columbus, Savannah, Birmingham, or Charleston will be required. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8060 SEMINAR: HISTORY OF THE SOUTH
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the political, social, cultural, and economic history of the antebellum and postbellum South.

HIST 8065 HISTORY OF GEORGIA
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

This seminar course offers an overview to some of the key currents and developments in Georgia history, from pre-colonial times to contemporary Georgia, as well as the relevant historiography. The course will situate Georgia history within a variety of broader regional, national and international contexts. Furthermore, the course will emphasize the history of both ordinary and prominent Georgians, and will include examples of various subfields of history (i.e., environmental history, social history, labor history, women’s history, political history). This offering is of use to students considering Georgia-related themes for their theses and dissertations, students in the Heritage Preservation Program, and TEEMS students alike, along with students generally interested in the subject.

HIST 8070 SEMINAR IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HIST
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

A three-topic sequence which explores the diversity in African-American ideologies, movements, class and gender. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8080 SEMINAR: INTERNATIONAL HISTORY OF US
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Consideration of theoretical and methodological approaches, across fields and disciplines, relevant to U.S. international/transnational. Historical and historiographical themes vary, as does emphasis on reading and research. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 8200 SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Content alternates between Greece and Rome. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8210 SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of medieval Europe. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8220 SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of early modern Europe. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8230 SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of modern Europe. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8250 SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Readings in the history of Russia and the Soviet Union. Topics vary and include Kievan and Muscovite Russia, Imperial Russia, Revolutionary Russia, and the Stalinist Soviet Union. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8252 SEMINAR IN GERMAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of Germany. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8254 SEMINAR IN FRENCH HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of France. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8260 EARLY MODERN BRITISH, IRISH, AND ATLANTIC HIS
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of early modern Britain, Ireland, and the Atlantic. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8270 MODERN BRITISH, IRISH AND IMPERIAL HIST
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the history of modern Britain, Ireland and the British Empire. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8280 SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN CULTURAL & INTELLECTUAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the cultural and intellectual histories of Europe. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8400 GLOBAL SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Global, inter/transnational, and diasporic social movements in historical perspective; topics may include abolitionism and pacifism, anticolonialism, feminist and women's movements, socialism, communism, and labor and peasant movements, movements for immigrant, indigenous and human rights, etc. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8410 SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics from African history. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8420 SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8430 SEMINAR IN SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Seminar in South Asian History. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8440 SEMINAR IN EAST ASIAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Content varies in three-part rotation: China to 1850, Japan to 1868; and Comparative Modernization of China and Japan. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8450 SEMINAR IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8460 SEMINAR IN ATLANTIC WORLD HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Examination of the political, social, cultural, and economic interactions of the inhabitants of the Africa, Europe, and the Americas and their descendants. Topics may include comparative conquest, colonialism, geopolitical struggles, commodities, slavery and abolition, race and gender relations, revolution, migration, and 19th and 20th century nationalisms. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8500 SEMINAR IN EURASIAN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Selected topics in the pre-modern history of Eurasia emphasizing cross-cultural interactions and other large-scale approaches in the transcontinental zone roughly bounded by the eastern Mediterranean and western China, and north of Arabia and India, e.g: nomads and nomadic migrations; religious and cultural encounters and exchanges along the Silk Roads; the Iranian, Byzantine, and Islamic commonwealths; and the vast Turko-Iranian and Mongol enterprises, Dual emphasis on historiography (primary and secondary) and preparation for teaching survey courses in pre-modern Eurasian and world history.

HIST 8510 MIGRATION AND DIASPORA IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Topics may include contexts, causes, and forms of migration; politics of emigration and immigration; diasporic cultures and identities; and theoretical and methodological problems of migration history. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

HIST 8600 INTRO TO HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Historical evolution of preservation as a public movement in the United States, with emphasis on programs of local, state, and federal governments.

HIST 8610 PRESERVATION LAW
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

The law applicable to historic preservation and the many legal issues relevant to it. An overview of legal systems at the federal, state, and local levels, as they relate to historic preservation.

HIST 8620 CONSERVATION: HISTORIC BUILDING MATERIALS
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Introduction to the theory and practice of building materials conservation, restoration, rehabilitation, and appropriate techniques for restoration and rehabilitation of historic structures.

HIST 8630 THE AMERICAN BUILT ENVIRONMENT
Credit Hour(s): 3.0 TO 4.0

Explores the history, design, and meaning of ordinary buildings in the U.S. from houses and resorts to skyscrapers and factories. Topics include theories of "high" culture and "low," definitions of house and home, the cultural significance of real estate, and how to assign value to mass-produced landscapes. Students will learn to use buildings as evidence of larger social, economic, and political trends in the 19th and 20th century, and to interpret buildings through methodologies and theories from urban and architectural history, cultural geography, anthropology, and sociology.

HIST 8635 U.S. CITIES
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

The history of the U.S. city from colonial times to the present, focusing on spatial development, technological change, and their relationship to civic culture.

HIST 8640 PRESERVATION PLANNING
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Planning tools for the identification and preservation of the historic environment. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8645 HISTORIC RESOURCE EVALUATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

An introduction to the philosophical and practical aspects of historic resource survey and evaluation, including application of the National Register of Historic Places criteria.

HIST 8650 HISTORIC AMERICAN LANDSCAPES & GARDENS
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

American landscapes and gardens with respect to the social, cultural, historical, and geographic factors that influence their design and development.

HIST 8655 THE AMERICAN SUBURB
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

(Same as Geog 8655.) Since the 19th century the suburb has been the type metropolitan environment most Americans prefer to live in, and since 1980 the U.S. has been a predominantly suburban nation. Surveys the history of the suburb as an idea and as a physical, social, and political community, using literature from urban and architectural history, cultural geography, anthropology, and sociology. Explores the history and meaning of suburbia as traditionally defined (white, affluent, residential) as well as the emergence of other types of communities, including working-class, African-American, industrial, and multifamily suburbs.

HIST 8660 CASE STUDY INTERNATIONAL PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

The study of preservation and conservation programs and processes in foreign countries, through lectures, readings, and site visits. Comparison of preservation and public history as it is practiced in foreign programs with the approaches taken in the United States. Field trips abroad are required. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 8665 CULTURAL LANDSCAPE PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Cultural Landscape Preservation is a graduate level course in the Heritage Preservation Program (other graduate students may also register) designed to develop an understanding and vocabulary about cultural landscapes; articulate landscape preservation concepts through verbal and written mediums; understanding techniques, processes, and policies related to the documentation and preservation of cultural landscapes; and work collaboratively to develop a Cultural Landscape report.

HIST 8680 INTERNSHIP
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 15.0

Prerequisite: consent of the department. Required for students seeking concentration in archival administration. Through a prescribed field experience students are given the opportunity to apply knowledge, theory, and understanding gained from courses. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8690 AMERICAN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Major themes in American architecture from European colonization to modernism. Selected architects, buildings, and vernacular traditions are examined.

HIST 8700 CASE STUDY IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Research seminar in techniques of documentation and analysis of historic sites and districts.

HIST 8720 MUSEUM STUDIES
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Comprehensive overview of museums in the U.S., their history, philosophical backgrounds, and ethical issues. Museum management, artifact accession, and exhibition production will be examined.

HIST 8730 EXHIBIT PLANNING & PRODUCTION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

This course examines the process by which museums create exhibitions, from planning and research through object identification and selection, community involvement, script and text preparation, design, fabrication, installation and maintenance. The course brings students into contact with theory, and provides application of theory through their conceptualization and installation of an interpretive history exhibition.

HIST 8740 MATERIAL CULTURE
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

Provides an overview of interdisciplinary approaches to diverse material culture traditions including furniture, architecture, decorative arts, clothing and adornment, foodways, and other aspects of material life. Students explore issues of material form and structure, geographic diffusion, function, construction techniques, and multiple ways of understanding material objects in context, including cultural landscapes, performance, consumption, embodiment, and the role of the senses. This course will emphasize material culture as a means of understanding everyday life historically, as well as contexts for the exhibition and interpretation of material objects in contemporary public contexts such as museums.

HIST 8800 DIRECTED STUDY IN PUBLIC HIST
Credit Hour(s): 3.0

Independent study documenting and analyzing issues, programs and themes relating to case studies in public history. Emphasis on individual research and/or major project production.

HIST 8810 SEM IN THE HISTORY OF GENDER
Credit Hour(s): 4.0

(Same as WSt 8810.) Relationship between the ideology of gender and social or cultural practices; special attention to race, religion, work, politics, or empire. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8885 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HERITAGE PRESERVATION
Credit Hour(s): 3.0 TO 4.0

Analysis of selected topics in public history or historical preservation such as cultural resource management, historic site management, museum management or curatorial studies. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 8890 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY
Credit Hour(s): 3.0 TO 4.0

Analysis of a selected historical issue or topic, such as modernization, religion, revolution, role of women, and peasant societies. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 8900 DIRECTED READINGS
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 4.0

For students preparing for field examinations. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 8999 THESIS RESEARCH
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 15.0

May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 9010 DIRECTED RESEARCH: HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 4.0

Prerequisite: consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 9020 DIRECTED RESEARCH: HISTORY OF EUROPE
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 4.0

Directed Research in the History of Europe. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 9030 DIRECTED RESEARCH: ASIA, AFRICA, OR THE MIDDLE EAST
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 4.0

Prerequisite: consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 9999 DISSERTATION RESEARCH
Credit Hour(s): 1.0 TO 15.0

May be repeated for credit if topics vary.