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Graduate Students

 

 

Holly Adams

e-mail: hadams7 [at] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  David Washburn

B.A. (Psychology), Georgia State University, 1994
M.A. (Religious Studies), Georgia State University, 2009
M.A. (Psychology), Georgia State University, 2012

I have two areas of research interest. The topic that I have pursued with my thesis and dissertation work is designed to illuminate the cognitive changes that result from prayer. Specifically, I am examining the ways that perception, attention, memory and decision making may be affected by prayer, so as to understand how people come to perceive when prayers have been answered. In the second research theme, supported by the 2CI University Doctoral Fellowship in Primate Social Cognition, Evolution and Behavior (PSCEB), I am examining attention, learning, and memory in monkeys as they come to learn icons or symbols that represent different people, animals, activities, and so forth. 



 

Holly Adams

Catherine Talbot

e-mail: ctalbot1 [at] student [dot] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  Sarah Brosnan
B.S. (Biological Sciences), Florida State University, 2006

I am a graduate student working with Dr. Sarah Brosnan at the Language Research Center on various projects investigating cooperation and prosociality among brown capuchin monkeys.  I also manage the Cebus Lab (http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwcbs/index.html) at Georgia State University. My current interests lie within social cognition both within and outside the primate order.  Previously, I have also worked with Dr. Brosnan at the Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research of the UT/MD Anderson Cancer Center investigating economic and social decision making in chimpanzees and squirrel monkeys.  Additionally, I have assisted then Ph.D. candidate, Steffen Foerster,  investigate physiological and psychological sources of stress in adult female blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis) in Kenya with a focus on food availability and intraspecific competition. I also worked with Dr. Marilyn Norconk in researching the interaction of saki monkeys (P.  pithecia and C. satanas) with seed demography and the impact on pre- and post-dispersal seed predation.

 



Audrey Parrish

e-mail: audrey.parrish1 [at] gmail [dot] com

Advisor:  Sarah Brosnan
B.S. (Biology), Winthrop University, 2009
M.A. (Psychology), Georgia State University, 2011

I am a graduate student in the Cognitive Sciences Ph.D. program at Georgia State University with Dr. Sarah Brosnan. I am currently investigating cooperative behavior in several primate species at the Language Research Center, with a primary focus on capuchin monkeys. My research interests include the investigation of social behavior using tool-use tasks, economic game theory via exchange tasks, and joint computerized tasks. Within these different approaches, I am interested in the motivations underlying these social interactions and the contexts in which cooperative behavior would have emerged. My previous research at Winthrop University focused on habitat utilization and resource partitioning of nine different primate species in the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest during the dry season.

Click here for CV

 

 

Jessica Bramlett

e-mail: jbramlett1 [at] student [dot] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  David Washburn
B.S. (Psychology), Kennesaw State University, May 2008

I am a student of the Cognitive Sciences Ph.D. program at Georgia State University, working with David Washburn.  My research interests primarily involve inter-species differences in attention ability.  I am currently pursuing the study of attention training in non-human primates.  Former research experience includes the effect of arousal on memory in older adults, working memory performance and adult literacy, and processing strategies involved in learning.

  
BRAMLETT
 

Sara Price

e-mail: sprice16 [at] student [dot] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  Sarah Brosnan
B.S. (Neuroscience & Behavioral Biology), Emory U, 2010

I am a graduate student in the Cognitive Sciences PhD program at Georgia State University working with Dr. Sarah Brosnan. My broad interests span various aspects of social cognition and how social factors affect behavior and decision-making in primates. I am especially interested in the interaction between the inequity response and prosocial behavior, including what social or ecological factors might overcome self-centered motivations to provide conditions in which prosocial behavior would be more likely to occur. My previous work with primates has included investigating social learning in chimpanzees at the Michale E. Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, as well as exploring imitation strategies in orangutans, gorillas, and children at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. As an undergraduate at Emory University, I also studied chimpanzee bluff displays with Dr. Lisa Parr at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center.

 

SaraPrice
 

Laurent Pretot

e-mail: lpretot1 [at] student [dot] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  Sarah Brosnan
BSc (Biology), University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), 2008
MSc. (Biology of Parasites & Behavior Ecology), University of Neuchatel, 2010

I am a graduate student collaborating with Dr. Sarah Brosnan in the field of non-human primate cognition and cooperation. I am particularly interested in the phenomena of collaboration such as coalitions and alliances in monkeys and great apes. During my master's program, I studied the relation between parasite/host and also eco-ethology with a specific orientation in cooperation/conflict in cleaner-client reef fish interactions.

My master's project was partially at the LRC in a collaborative project between the group of Prof. Redouan Bshary at the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland) and the group of Sarah Brosnan at Georgia State University. My work aimed to study two animal species (fish vs. monkeys) showing different ecologies, cooperative and cognitive mechanisms in a cooperative exchange task only ecologically relevant to one of them.

 

Pretot 

Rachel Callery

e-mail: rcallery1 [at] student [dot] gsu [dot] edu

Advisor:  David Washburn
B.S. (Psychology), University of Georgia, May 2013

I am a graduate student in the Cognitive Sciences program. My research interests are primarily in comparative cognition and use of social referencing cues across species. My prior research at the University of Georgia investigated the use of caregiver and researcher-given intonation as a social referencing cue in African Grey parrots and human infants. The purpose of such research is to determine whether African Greys and infants are similarly inclined to utilize this social cue when faced with an ambiguous situation or novel object. In the Language Research Center, I will be collaborating with Dr. Washburn in studies of symbolic social referencing and executive attention of Rhesus macaques.


 RECENT STUDENTS WHO HAVE EARNED THEIR PHDs

Megan Hoffman, PhD 

B.A. (Psychology), Florida International University, 2004
M.A. (Cognitive Sciences), Georgia State University, 2007
PhD (Cognitive Science), Georgia State University, 2012

Research area: Comparative cognition, with a specific emphasis on the study of memory across species, including nonhuman primates.  

Dr. Hoffman is currently an Assistant Professor at Piedmont College

Click here to visit Megan's website.

 
 

Lisa Heimbauer, PhD 

B.A. (Anthropology), SUNY at Stony Brook, 2004

M.A. (Psychology), Georgia State University, 2009
PhD (Psychology), Georgia State University, 2012

Research area: the perception of speech-like acoustics and language-related cognitive abilities in comparative perspective, as well as identifying critical components of speech perception in humans.

 

Dr. Heimbauer is currently a postdoctoral associate at Penn State University.

 

Click here for CV

 

 
 

Darby Proctor, PhD

B.A. (Anthropology), University of Florida, 2002
M.S. (Business Management), University of Florida, 2003
M.A. (Anthropology), Georgia State University, 2007
PhD (Psychology), Georgia State University, 2012

Research area: non-human primate behavioral economics, culture, and the impact of humans living in close proximity to non-human primates.

Dr. Proctor is currently a FIRST postdoctoral fellow at Emory University.

Click here to visit Darby's website.